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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: May 17, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 17, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W BATHER I.llhl ruin chnnfa c OMICS For the Tops in Adventure Se Back Tasre Daily Full Lemcd Wire Newi Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 77 .WINONA. MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING. MAY 17. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES One Hundred And Fifty Of the top retrievers of the nation were entered in the spring trial or the Golden Retriever Club of America bPlnR htlcl this weekend on Prnlrlc Island. Two stakes frot under way at 8 a. m, today, the derby and the limited open all-age stake. Tic above photographs .-.hows some of the activities on the grounds today. Thrrr of thr many women visitors here for the trail arc shown In the picture at the left. They are Mrs. Peter Pcrsonen, W.-iusiiu. Wl.i.- Mrs. W. "Cotton" PcrxhaU of St. Louis, and Mrs. Don Talbcrt of Rush City. Minn. In tho next picture Is George Mclntosh, formerly of Wlnona.now of Richmond, Ind., official In charge of the limited all-age stake. In the third picture from the left Is W. "Cotton" Pershall of St. Louis with V-Day or Deer Creek, a black Labrador entered rieiu is shown in the fourth picture with Joe Vcrsay of Milwaukee. This dog reared in Winona and originally owned by Mrs. Audrey Myers Smith, and now owned by B. L. Boalt of Wllwaukcc, was high point dog of the nation in 1948 and already has won two firsts in 1947. The picture at the right shows the two judges ol the limited all-age stake, James Hogan ol Hayward, and Rob bridge of Milwaukee.__________________________________Rcpubbcan-Herald 150 Dogs in Action at Trial Here Best Retrievers of Nation Put Through The best In llm nation were in action here this afternoon In limited all-ago stake of Iho Golden Rrtrlcvrr Club of America spring trial held on I'rulrlo Island. The stake opened this morning with an entry list of 40 nnd will continue through Hun rtny. Thrrr arc. 1M) dog.-. In (ill tho Today's program was n two-ring nhow. In addition to thp open all- nge stftl-.e. the derby staKn bc- mc run. In this event were en- tries or prombtni; young dogs from the mnjor krnnel.i thu country. This derby event was to bo fol- lowed later today by the nonwln- ncr r.tnke with an entry list of ci dogs. Thl.i event, because, of tho large number of entries, may run over Into Sunday. Two net-s of Judges and nfflclnM nrc working the trlal.i, and they ivro bctne staged a.i depurate events. This forenoon the di-riiy stake was! on the river ulcle of tho long WInorwi dam dike and the open all- ftfip on tho land side. A largo gal- lery of sportsmen find women wa.i followlnc each event.. nimous lines I Tn the entry list of the open nll- fcirr s'nke, are such as 1'MoUI Trlftl Champion t'.tllrovln Nltro Kx-; press, high imliit dog of (he nation for lO'lfl iind top (kig to date In IP'17. Loot Taken From Three Residences Found Cached in Hills Across River Truman Called To Bedside Of Mother Heart Condition Very Serious, Physician Says Loot From The llurelnrles of two Minnesota City homes and one Winona home Is being carried from 11 hiding pliic'o' by Edward McCumbcr, former Rochester man, whom Sheriff George Port said has admitted burglarizing thu residences, A mnjor portion ol the loot taken in these burglaries was recov- ered from [i shallow ciivo in the face ot the rock on top ol a high bluff north of the Burlington rail- road station in McCwmbw, who Ja bolnjr-questioned todny nbout other breftk-lns In Winona, was apprehended after entering tho residence of James Naglo, near Minnesota City Friday evening, McCumber, shown at the wan In the house when tho Naglcs arrived home. Republican-Herald photos Grand view, Mo. President Truman was summoned to the bed- side of his ailing 94-year-old mother soday after her condition took a ;urn for the worse. He landed at Grandvlew airport at a. m. today. Brigadier General Wallace Gra- ham, the President's personal phy- sician who has been attending Mrs. Truman, said her condition was 'very She is suffering from a tired heart." General Graham said, "Her condition at all times has been se- but she has been getting along well. We have got her out of bed arid into a rocking chair every day. had, hopes of getting her to Airliner Sets Burbank-to-Miami Speed Record Miami, Constellation four to his credit out of airliner dot u now TJurbank-to-Ml- uml trunscontlnnntiil commercial The 1'iiul Iiakewdl string of dogs spord record ot six hours, 5'l mln- from St. champions In manyiutox and 57 seconds todny nnd soon also nrc on tho grounds In'roured Into tho air for n Miami-New York record. Tho pliinu, a new Eastern airliner with Cuptivln Eddie. Rlckunbnckcr of "Cotton" Pershnll, Chnrlry Morutin from Milwaukee n strlntr of dogs, present with IJOKS from tlie Neliwrd Kennel.t.'ivbourd nncl 11. T. (Dick) Merrill fit ftiicl from New York the coiHrcilo, xpod (it un avui'fiKO of ftnrt Nrw Jersey kennels nre hero. 3'IO mllcft un hour over thu Wlllium Wunderllch. former to bettor the record set a nnnnn, Is on the grounds with n' month nKO by n Pan-Amcrlcnn- From tho face of a towering pin nacle rock In a wild area on the Wisconsin bluffs overlooking Wino- rm, Sheriff George Port todny re- covered the majority of loot taken In three house burglaries at Minne- sota City and one In Wlnonn. Tho .shcrUr WON led to the spot by Edward S. McCumber, formerly of Rochester, who was nprehendcd b'y Fort late Friday evening after ho had ransacked the James Naglc residence near Minnesota City. McCumbcr, who told Fort thnt he had "been sleeping outside also led the sheriff to another cache of stolen articles which he had hid- den in tho foundation of an aban- doned shed between the Burlington railroad station nnd Winona high- way 35. The major portion of loot, how- ever, was taken from a hiding place walk, but her weak." heart Is extremely Brewster Asks Federal Aid for Aircraft Industry Senator Owen Brewster (R.-Malne) said today the nation's aircraft industry is ailing txnd needs government help quic- ]y. Brewster is head of a Senate commerce subcommittee. "Our hemispheric air he told a reporter, "are going out the window while we are stalling around." He said It is up to Congress to act because "It is difficult, if not the weakened condition of her heart. Mrs. Truman fractured a hip in a fall at her home last February. The fracture had healed to the point where the cast was removed a week ago. It was the third fracture Mrs. Truman had suffered In recent years. A hip and a shoulder, re- spectively, were broken In previous falls. Despite her advanced years she recovered from these injuries and was able to move around the house until she fell last February while preparing to retire. Miss Mary Jane Truman, sister of the president, said "Mother Js resting quite corhfortably now, but she Is quite ill so I decided to call the President to Grandview." She said complications had de- veloped and referred all questions to General Graham. General Graham said that Mrs. Truman's fracture had healed to the point where she could walk in another few days were It not for impossible, to draw n line of de- marcation between national secur- top Twin C'ltles dogs. iOrnco Oougln.i DC-0 of seven hours, in tho face of a spiral rock on jntcrcsts Of the avia- M Klngswerc Kennels of WI-JM mlnuti-n. t.n.t h.ui ijiid luck tills iiioniliipr! After dl.wmbni'klnc threo ncw.s- TotikHnhof M'ltherlipllp, their men nnd refueling, the big. four-cn- all-line stukc, glued KAf.. craft hoppe.d nt first heut. The dog p, in. (C.D.T.i on tho mile rll.......... Lu Ounrdlu Mold. Now York. entry In thr on thr was hiitidlrd by Dave Klllott, nil- flight to Newark, or HIM milos to tlonally known trainer, (.round The trlnk are tx-lni; staged the Golden Itetrlever Club of Amer-i Iciv under the sixm.inr.shlp of the1 Tri-S'-tiito Hunting Dog awio- (1 Weather i Vtir Winona nnil vicinity: Occa- light rain tonight, inoKlly be- Ground condition.', were described foru midnight. Sunday partly elou- ir: ideal, with good cover for dy. I.ltlld change In temperature.. .'.eu-.dii df the year. tonight M; high Sunday 711 Kn'.Minee to I'ralrle Island today to 75, wii-; tiy way of Minnesota City, and Minnesota: trie Wlnona-   innd the gag for the same reason. jMcCumber said today that he had .'never had to use either the "Jack" nun cli-.mh, l.s rxjH'drcl to un examination by psy- '.tu-'.', .starting Monday, the tlls- office reporter! yes- ihourii ending at 12 m, today: i ,h ..y t.. 1 Maximum, 70; minimum. M; noon. ransacking the Mi: precipitation, truer: sun sets to- lit sun rises tomorrow' (Continued on 3, Column .1.) LOOT Flood Slagu Stafjo Today Change n.o .a .2 tl.fi .2 7.1 H.'J n.i N. Y.) chairman of the House ap- propriations committee. wa.s asked by a House foreign affairs subcom- mittee today to outline his objections to thu State department's cultural relations program, which includes the "Voice of America" broadcasts, Tabor's committee eliminated a budget item which the department asked for the program. Tuber hiu; told the House he docs not like administration of the pro- gram and challenges loyalty of some ot the employes participating in the program. However, he has said he might be. willing to support an appropriation of or provided 'at -itari. City Uuin'-l, i'.' 12 13 iDnni o, 'Diiln 7, T.W. T.W, ll.Kl i'- ordered by ii-IJMl Jutlm- Herbert ,1. Kleffes. S..M-II delayed beciiuse of the ,1 m_t 1 !l .1 rrllnitary Strrams Unrand.. -1.7 at Thellmiui.. nbcivu Alma.... 2.7 Mexican AnimuU Killed to Unit Dlsensc The reported today thnt lli.ooo anlmiils have tn-rn KiiiuKhtcrcd and burled In the cuinpiilk'n to stamp out foot and mouth disease in Mexico. Tlv Announcement said that In .1 l.l fill Craw at W, Snle.m Root nt Houston -I 1.3 KIVKIt FOKKCAST (From HikHtliiKS to Guttonbcrc) Tho Mississippi will continue fall- ing slowly throughout this district with average dally falls of .1 to 2 foot for several dayy. Scattered hddiiinri some iininiiil'. T.'.ooo have "apparently iraln.i tho past four days will cause been sent to'u marked rise In the Wisconsin slaughter in the main qimruntlno rones of r.outhtti.'.tcni Mexico, river below Wisconsin Rapids tho next hours. Marshall Can't Attend U. of W. Commencement Mtulison, WIs. Secretary of State George C. Marshall will be unable; to come to the University of Wisconsin May 24 to receive an honorary degree because of a heavy work schedule, President E. B. Fred announced today. In n telegram to Fred, the .secre- tory of state said demands of his position and the exacting slate of world affairs at this time resulted la cancellation ot his trip to Madl- soii to attend the university's Slth commencement, Great Northern Man New Head of Illinois Line Chicago Directors of the Chicago S; Eastern Illinois railroad announced Friday J. M. Budd, St. Paul, an official of the Great Northern railway, had been made president of their line. He is a son of Ralph Budd, president of the Chicago, Burlington t Qulncy rail- road. tion industry." "We are ahead of other nations In current operating Brew- ster said, "but far behind in the development of new types of planes For Instance, Great Britain just sold the Argentine government 75 jet fighter planes. That .government wouldn't even look nt our Brewster said thnt if the next war is fought in the air the United States will find itself at a critical disadvantage. Tuber Cul Ind Represcntativu John.Tabcr (R.- ,ho program is restricted and the number of employes revised. Secretary George C, Marshall told the subcommittee yesterday that n program of "truth" about the Unit- ed States is necessary Russian propaganda. to "offset1 Pig Production Increase Urged Washington The Agricul- ture department today recommend- ed n 15 per cent increase In pig jrocluction this fall to boost the nation's pork .supply in the spring and" summer or 194B. Achievement of this goal would in a fall crop of about 000 pigs compared with about last fall. Since the 1947 spring crop is ex- pected to be about head, for the whole year would be about or nearly more than in 1946. The spring crop will be marketed next 'all and winter. The department said the increase n pork is being sought since pros- pects point to less beef1 and veal n 1048. He described her Injury as an "inter and extracapsular fracture of the left hip." "At flrst she had a little difficulty with her liver and she had some Oklahoma Sinks On Way to U.S. Battleship Was to Be Cut for Scrap Stassen to Make Bid in Primaries Cites Support to State Republican Central Committee St. Paul Stas- sen has told Minnesota Repiibltcans that an effort might be JBffefc; -to "stampede" a decision before he can. make Ills bid for the party's Forest Fire Takes Jap Homes Tokyo TWO Japanese were killed and homes were de- stroyed yesterday by a forest lire Which swept through two villages near Iwanizawa on western Hok- ca ma i 1948 presidential nomination in 1948 primaries. Speaking last night before the Minnesota Republican Central com- mittee in his first home appearance since a recent European tour, tin: former governor added he was con- fident that "Republican orgamza- tions and leadersliip will not be stampeded but will await the out- come of the primaries and ctats conventions." Majority Back Views Stassen said he realized he and his supporters were facing n "dif- ficult and uphill task" but that he thought "the majority of the mem- bers of our party support my basic views upon both foreign and do- mestic problems." He called his Eu- ropean survey "one of the most valuable and informative ten weeks I ever spent." Thanking the party for having endorsed him for the presidency at its convention, Stassen added that 'The growing association with us of katdo, northernmost Japanese 1s- the U. S. army reported to- day. Goes Down in Pacific 450 Miles From Honolulu San battle- ship Oklahoma went down for time today. Tbc.lpnce mighty survivor of ikfllbvln the Japanese attack on Peart' Harbor' pluuucu to ooi- tom at a. m. (CJD.T.) 540 miles out of Honolulu In an area or tha Pacific approximately three miles deep. Abandoned by the navy as fighting ship, the 33-year-old ves- sel was under tow to an Calif., drydock company ror scrap- Duluth Youth, 15 Held for Weckler Extortion Attempt St. Paul, Minn, A federal extortion complaint was signed lost night against a 15-year-old Duluth, Minn., youth held for sending a _ som note to George Weckler, ]lcr purchase Tor scrap, bad. of a missing eight-year-old Fort At-iorcjercd the tugs Hercules and The coast-guard announced thcrs were no crewmen aboard. launched i reported I Young Brothers, ]isUnB Honolulu agency which klnson, Wis., girl, the Federal Bu- reau of Investigation office here said. Monarch, which had the ship dor tow, to return to Pearl Harbor rather than try to moke the maln- E. S. Notesteen. assistant agent in hand. She Jeft Honolulu last Satur- charge, said the youth was arrested: day. at a Duluth bus depot Thursday when he claimed a decoy package supposed to have contained the demanded in the note. He temperature, but the physicians j b thoughtful women, by farm- were able to cope with those i Jthe West and, Middlewcst, by dltions Now the only complication; sound ]abor and by Ermxll IS her heart. onrt men a number of neighboring Mid west the youtli had admitted writ- states is overcoming the tho missive but knew nothing of comparative delegate numbers." j ol whereabouts of the missing Must Prove Support "I believe my views are parti- cularly he declared, "by war veterans, by alert young peo- Suffcrs Setback Announcement of the President's departure was made by Eben Ayers White House press secretary. Aycrs said Mr. Truman wns told that his mother suffered one set- back during the night, rallied from that, and then became a little worse. Only last Sunday Mr. Truman flew out to visit his mother and reassure himself that she was re- covering satisfactorily from the in- Jury which she sullercd in 11 fall last February. General Graham then told report- ers that Mrs. Truman was pro- gressing satisfactorily and advised tho President he could return to Washington the same day, which he did. Delay in Greek Aid President Truman's absence from Washington will delay his signing of the Greek-Turkish assistance bill. Eben Ayers, presidential aide, .told reporters today that Mr. Truman Imd planned to sign the measure Monday or Tuesday. He said the ceremony will be postponed pend- ing the outcome of Mrs. Martha Truman's illness. Congress gave final approval to the measure Thursday and Mr. Tru- man has ten days to affix his signa- ture and make it law. Meanwhile, he Is seeking a director for the aid program, whose nomination must oe confirmed by the Senate. Wartime Butter Set-Aside Ends Agriculture department ended yesterday a war- timu order which required butter- makers to set aside part ot their output for military and other war needs. Although June, 1946, was 1.he last month in which a set-aside was required, the .order was continued until substantially all of the ear- marked butter was delivered to government agencies. Under this order, the government took as much as 28 per cent of the ;otal annual output of creamery butter. business and professional men throughout the nation. "However, it will be necessary for us to prove that support unless and until we can win victories in a number of Republican primaries next spring. I believe we can and will win those Stassen said specific views on major questions he would present openly to the people in a manner careful of keeping the Republican party united in its aim for victory In November. 1948. He added thnt lie would eschew personalities In his campaign. St. Paul Woman Elected Delegates to the annual meeting of the State Federation of Women's Republican clubs Friday elected Miss Anne M. Stuart or St. Paul to the organization's presidency. Mrs. Warren S. Moore of Duluth was elected first vice-president, Mrs. Raymond Smith or Rochester, second vice-president, Mrs. F. P. Heffelflnger of Wayzata third vice- president, Mrs, Walter H. Wheeler of Minneapolis, corresponding sec- retary. Mrs. Sylvia of Montevideo recording secretary, and Mrs. W. A. Evans of Mankato, treasurer. The federation met in conjunc- tion with the conference of the Republican State Central commit- tee. Keys Replaces Clark on Allied Austrian Council Tru- man today appointed Lieutenant General Geoffrey Kcycs to be Unit- ed States high commissioner on the Allied Council for Austria, effective at once. General Keyes will replace Gen- eral Mark Clark who has been as- signed to a new command In this country. Keyes Is in command of U. S. .irmed forces in Austria and is now acting as high commissioner. No Senate confirmation, ol his appoint- ment Is required. child. Note Text The complaint against the youth Stripped Little of the Oklahoma's former might remained for her last voyage. Her superstructure, including her antiaircraft batteries, her ten 14- inch guns and 16 live-inch, guns, was gone. Much of her machinery, however. including boilers remained intact. Torpedoed from the air in tha Hie compjajuL. iiyujjj.-M. I.HL. juun.ii was signed by Leslie J. Kunz, whom Japanese air attack at Pearl Harbor. as "one of refloated in May, 19-13. arid rebuilt. Sister Ship Nevada Her sister ship. The Nevada, was torpedoed and bombed in the same disastrous action but succeeded ia beaching herself and later was com- plotoly refitted. Tho Moon; Drydock Company of Oakland had purchased the Okla- homa us Junk for und planned to begin reducing her to scrap in June. Displacing 29.000 tons, the Okla- homa had an over-all length or 583 feet and a beam of 107 'cct. Her lighting complement was 1.- 301 men. Her builder was the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, which., laid the keel in October of ISIS .ind completed the vessel in May of 191G. _______ F.B.I, agents ___Wisconsin and Minnesota who took part In the arrest. The note, made a part of the complaint, read, according to the F.B.I.: "Send addressed to Mor- gan A. Kemptor at the Greyhound bus station In Duluth to be hold for delivery. Don't tell the law or you'll never see her again I promise." It was unsigned. The agents said that was not the youth's name nor could they locate anyone in Duluth bearing it. Notesteen said agents approach- ed the youth as he received the package but he informed them he :md been sent for it by a man at a Duluth downtown business estab- lishment. They released him but fol- lowed. When he emerged from the building, the agent said he went to the Duluth Western Union office and left the package, saying It would be called for. Taken Into Custody The suspect was then taken into custody, asked to print out the ran- som note's words and was Jailed when Notesteen said they followed almost the exact pattern ol' the original. Notslecn sold the youth would be brought to St. Paul "within a day or two" for arraignment before U. S. Jommissioner W. T. Goddard. He ?aid the suspect may either plead to the extortion charge or appeal to tho U. S. attorney general for trial under the juvenile delinquency :tatule. The youth refused to answer ques- tions as to why he had written t'nc lote or whether he expected to get uvay with the scheme, agents said. They said the youth apparently never had been In any trouble bc- Aberdeen Men Escape in Crash Minneapolis Marino First jieutenant Lincoln Boyd, Jr.. and lis passenger, A. Hickenbotham, both of Aberdeen, S. escaped unhurt, officials at Wold-Chamber- ain airport said, when the Hell- diver plane Boyd was flying was 'orecd to crash land near Echo, Minn. 4 v Wisconsin Forms MacArthur for President Club Ala.ili.son. A. Rlt- ter, Wisconsin farmer who prevent- ed Governor Thomas E. Dcwcy's nomination for the presidency from being unanimous in the 19-14 Re- publican convention, was listed as secretary of a MacArthur for Presi- dent club in articles of Incorpora- tion filed with the secretary or yesterday. a Wisconsin delegate, held out 1'or MacArthur us the Chicago convention stampeded for Dcwey. Lansing Hoyt, listed as chairman n thu Incorporation artick-s. declar- ed yesterday "By electing 27 Mac- Arthur for President delegates tha of Wisconsin will truly honor their favorite .son in a mo.tt appro- priate manner." General M.icATthur, who was bom in Arkansas, calls Wisconsin his home state. Janesville Woman Elected by Servicemen's N'iairara Falls, Winzenbcrg. Janesville, Minn.. Fri- day was elected vice-president of the Mothers of Men In. Service of America, Inc.   

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