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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: May 7, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 7, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER Fair r tonight; wa Thu radii jr. c OMICS For the Tops in Adventure Comics Back Pape Daily Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 68 WINONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING. MAY 7. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY Shot Oklahoma Senate Floor Hokah Man Fatally Hurt On Highway Father of Six Killed When Car Hits Ditch Crrsrrnt, Minn. ral'v.n King, '10-year-oUl Hokah injured at ?-id.iv whi-ii car struck a '.I'-'hir.-.e iicile uiifl overturned at as Miller's corner on 1C, of here. a crushed chest and thc operating room at St. ho.'-piial at I .a Crosse. He v iiV fou-id by Harvey Miller and liotcher of Hokah who called When the arnbll- was delayed, the two men took in an to l.a Crosse. MI1- U.'r liacl been employed lit thc E. and M. R.'irriKO at La Cros.se as a mecha- was en route to Hokah. was born at Oilman, Okla., a: r: fin February '.I. married BrenniiKC-n of Trempealcau rnuntv. survlvlnc arc his widow, and children, Ronald, 12; Jua- IX'irletie. eight: Marwood, J.ianlyn. six; Tyrone, four; thrt-e. and Leslie, two. O'hrr survivors art- his mother Mr. and Mrs. Joseph w'.Trt' 'or North Bend, Wis.; three Raymond. Herman and of La Crosse; a grandmoth- e- Thomas Kaiser of Reads- tcwr.. wlr..: t-.vo hair brothers, Paul arid" Argy 'Nickolson of La Crosse, a r.ister. Mrs. Arthur Simpson r.' TJ.f bodv Is at the John Potter J-.ii.t-r.ii hoine Caledonia pend- ing funeral arrangements. The hlchway patrol Investigated thu accl- cicr.t. Vets" Franchise Fight At Rochester War II veterans th- Vets Cub line won a V.nm'.ny when the city coun- rr'.iiiV-d a franehise for opcra- "The uotlun came after thc coun- r'- r ".---ode by a fivo-to-fme vote a bv Mayor Claude H. McQull- f'. a new taxlciita ordinance. The council threw out pre- nr'inn In approving a maxi- -'.0 in ttv- city, and afvr irriin'.cd Hie CratK-hl.se, to v ha: filliclall.v designated as Company of to licenses to Wisconsin Phone Settlement to Be Submitted to Workers' Vote Effort to Bargain on Nation-Wide Basis Abandoned Milwaukee A. B. Lefevre, president of the striking Telephone Guild of Wisconsin announced to- day that the guild's bargaining com- mittee had agreed to contract pro- posals with the Wisconsin Tele- phone Company and that they vould be submitted to the member- Bill Ream, Chief Teller at a Los Angeles, Calif., bank .demon- strate'; a gadget he devised for breaking paper mapped rolls coins. The coins are tossed Into this converted cement mixer, which breaks the paper with Its fins ixs the drum rotates. Air from a blower shoots t e boken wrappings out the front. Ream estimates the machine does thc work in a tenth the time required In hand work. (A.P. Wlrephoto.) ____________________ Arab Committee Firm In Boycott of V. N. Talks By Larry Ha nek immediately by a spokesman the telephone company. Details of the terms for settle- ment of the strike which began just one month ago today were not re- vealed. A spokesman .for thc telephone company said that prior to lost night's resumption of bargaining, thc company had received a signed .statement from tho guild to the ef- fect that the guild would withdraw picket lines and instruct its mem- bers to return to work upon ratlil- cation of the agreement. Picket Lines Question The company had refused to re- sume negotiations because of tho guild's announced intention of hon- oring picket lines of three small communications unions. Last week thc company offered the strike union wage Increases ranging from to per week but the guild membership voted over- whelmingly against acceptance Originally thc guild asked but later reduced its demands to Thc company had at first refused to discuss the wage issue on thc grounds that it could best be handled by arbitration by the Wis- consin employment relations board Bargain On Local Level Unions which called thc cross- country telephone strike, last April 7 have abandoned efforts to negoti- ate their demands with the Bell sys- I tern on a nation-wide basis. This decision to shift the em- Greek Aid Under Sharp House Attack Opposition Moves to Shunt Program to United Nations By Alex II. Singleton Washington The sharpest attack on administration foreign policy since Pearl Harbor imperiled the Greek-Turkish aid bill today. Opposition forces in the House for j were throwing their full weight be- hind a move to shunt the whole 1s- Tokyo Authoritative but unofficial Japanese quarters said to- day that General Douglas Mac- Arthur told Emperor Hirohito thc United States would guarantee to defend disarmed Japan. Both official American and Jap- anese sources declined to comment. The story seeped through the wall of secrecy into Japanese govern- ment circles shortly after yester- day's meeting between MacArthur and Hirohito. Hirohito called to thank Mac- Arthur for Japan's new "antiwar constitution, which strips thc em- peror of his ancient authority ue to the United Nations. And the outcome was in doubt. A similar effort in the Senate failed. But passage there had been foregone conclusion for days be- fore the 67 to 23 vote April 22. In the House Republican ranks vcre split wide open as the chamber ins called together for the second day of. general debate on a program termed by friend and too alike as one of seldom-paralleled importance n the relations between this nation .nd the world. With a final showdown unlikely before tomorrow at the earliest, Chairman Eaton (R.-N. J.5. ol the House foreign affairs committee and Representative Bloom (D.-N. ranking minority member, planned to concentrate their fire on the coali- tion move to dump the Greek-Turk- ish dispute Into the U.K.'? lap. Pros and Cons Here arc some of the arguments for and against the Till! .is they were unfolded during yesterday's turrm- Iulu Take Success N Y An Arab spokesman said' today the, phnslj to ]ocai bargaining has hailed as Arab of Palestine would stand its by Bell officials as -.veil ,s debates on thc Holy Land but that the, union lender.-, as n move i> y would continue to participate In thc TJ.N. discus- sions. May Seek On Labor Law I'.y Jack Washington Republican leaders left open today the question -hT onb companies in talking over labor legislation with eventual operation of ft! president Truman. r: l.'A I The ilgns are that any O.O.P.wlll- T.V- ML'.ponded the to compromise will depend :x-r-d the Vets cab franchise lhc margin by which the Senate Dr. Charles Mnlik. Lebanon, add- ed that thc Arab nations- "were vi- tally Interested" In formation of an', Inquiry commission for Palestine, and as Unlied Nations members naturally would take part. TJ. S. Proposal The Arab position became known oir the lloor as the gcnural assem- bly's 55-natton political committee The 49-mcmlicr policy committee of the National Federation of Tele- phone which had been In session since March adjourned Indefinitely and its members returned home to help bargain out settlements In their own _., Federation of Telephone Workers of the District of Colum- bia, with members, accepted a contract providing weekly wage In- areiis. The began consideration of an American croascs of to It announced proposal that the U.N. establish a.lls members will respect picket lines, small neutral inquiry commissioner a traffic union which still is through three readings to approved Issu- a franchise1 to Howard Mc- GoL.r. for operation of a minimum cnb--. (.riiinancr. five-year fran- Its pending bill. to cab m rah licenses are With Democratic opponents gen- erally conceding' defeat, Senator Robert Taft (R.-Ohlo) led a drive for a final vote; Friday on the mea- -'.sure which would outlaw the closed ithorluc government injunc- ,lntlonnl emergency and curb union practices In without "Big Five" representation, i striking. Soviet circles disclosed that Rus- sia would fight for the inclusion of the "Big Five" on any such body. Warren R. Austin, United States, told the political committee that the special interests Involved among the great powers were a strong reason for not putting them on the com- mission. "We could hardly recognize that a body containing the 'Big Five' would be free of bias." he declared. To Ilr.ar Both The political committee last night had agreed to hear the Jewish Agency and tho Arab Higher Com- mittee present their views on "con- eoiwlll bt: no attempt on their part to) !mcl instructing' the special it, ......__ ...t_l_l_ Socialists Back Ramadier's Break With Communists Cal> Cmiip.'iiiy and tl vets'measure's terms with htm. ior' a minimum! But 1C the approval the President and discuss the vote falls cab... The franchise- will ........-..'frrtlve 30 days after the iiUbllc.V.lou In n few franehisu ordinance, .tircl when the short of the two thirds, then sup- porters may be willing to try to find (inquiry) committee which may be set up by this session of the as- sembly." The United States Insists that a small neutral Inquiry group would conference committees a better chance of making rec- he thi- previc in Letting are working out differences between House and Senate measures what Mr. Truman is prepared to accept. u _ notion of the' Senator Joseph Ball (R.-Minn.l, aximum of has suggested the possibility ot a ada, Ic- i- liceii.-.es of this kind, a move that____ iui- (In- Vets line. lalso was proposed by Harold E-iuethm-iands, u-. belnre the former Minnesota h :t. when the Ial avowed candidate for the Ke- .-ri.ii.-.'.li.u tu pre.-iidunllal nomination. c1 j._ nf li'-caii operutl'iii.'ii jjut Ball .said Mr. Truman should V.M.-; brought initiative on arranging such a conference. ommendatlons for solving the Pal- estine problem than a committee including the "Big Five." The XT. S. proposed that the In- quiry committee consist of Can- Czecho-Slovakla, Iran, Peru, Sweden and ''lilfiwlns.: another lengthy tin- council rxl rndorM-menis of tnuj Xiheatinn ffir a i 3 Dead, 6 Missing in English Coal Mine Explosion least were killed today and rni-'.sink' and believed Uarnsloy'3 in 'Pre-Crisis' Italian political clr- ,ck-.s used n brand new 1 to describe the un- -easy .situation in which Premier Alcide. tie Gasperl's coalition cabinet found Itself. They meant that while the gov- eminent wa.s silling atop a political economic volcano which might men were'erupt at any moment, there wa.s nun ,Ilolhlnf; so prccKing at thc moment to merit the use of the word blamed a .short an cler-trir line for the bla.st. the firi.l disaster In Britain the government, took v. January I. v a tdwii of ubout 70.000., York.-.hlrr. The national council of the Christian Democrat party voted last night to authorize Christian Demo- crat Premier Alcidc de Oaspcrl to ek thu "sincere- collaboration and of all vital forces ot I the- country" in meeting Italy's Minneapolis Milling iViVirniiiie economic problems. Executive Succumbs S. Helm, chairman of thc th-- RusM-11 Miller MilHllg at Northwestern ye.'.terday after having u'. a downtown garage physicians believed was -.-i: i-re widow and f.i.e of ut Rochester, Couple Divorced for 27 Years to Remarry Long Kc-.vch, never stopped loving said Frank L. Hector, 75, ns he ap- plied for a license to remarry Nellie M. Rector, 7G, who di- vorced him 27 years ago. "She needs me and I neccl he added. The wedding will take place, "In a week or two." Burma Unsolved Rangoon, loss of Ihu ship Sir Harvey Adamson, which disappeared In the Andaman sea off the Burma coast three weeks ago with 250 persons aboard, was written off today as another "unsolved mystery ot the MacArthur Guarantee on Japan's Defense Reported i__i. t r_ A MacArthur that an early poaee be signed, and tho task of occupation be turned over to the United Nations. Reliable sources said this had caused the emperor concern. They said he advised MacArthur there wns considerable Japanese concern because it was believed thc United Nations is not able at pres- ent to guarantee Japan's protection that thc Japanese army and navy are gone. Thc informants said MacArthur replied that the United States would make that guarantee. Wound Not Believed Serious Representative Accused of Shooting Asks to See Lawyer Earthquake Shakes Southern Wisconsin lent debate: Rich (R.- "If you pass this legislation, you will be sending your sons to fight on foreign soil." For S. Representative Mundt (R.- 'It will give new hope and Father Carroll said Milwaukee "very narrow escape" In thc quake and that "very serious dam- might have resulted It the age" shuddering had continued a frac- tion of a minute more. Dishes Broken As it was. only broken pictures dishes and other minor dam- j wiij. f- ujaiita confidence to freedom loving aKCS Were reported' in -Waukesho, __ nnrl people all over the world. It's go- ing to cause some serious thinking In the Kremlin." Representative Vurscll and jar- Racine, Kcnosha, Wnlworth Ozaukce counties, where tne ring was felt. VVKIUU.-.I. The exact duration of the phcno- (R "It may destroy thc eco- me-non was not known. Father car- nomlc and financial solvency of thiSjroll said, because after one-flitn 01 nation." !a second of the shock both on. For Rcprcser.lallve Howard Ule Marquette university seismo- y r .-France's Socialist par- .-atmcd today Premier Paul Ra- madier's decision ousting commu- nists from his coalition cabinet, thus ending a French government crisis. A hastily summoned national council of the party voted, to j 120, to approve the break with the extreme left, an action which may have political repercussions throughout western Europe. Rar.iadier, pleading for the coun- cil's endorsement in the hot 12-hour debate which preceded the vote, de- clared he would feel like a "grave- digger of the republic" if he were forced to resign. Supporting RnmadlCT. Loon Blum, former premier and an elder statesman of the parly, declared that "resignation of the government would bo tantamount to denial of the parliamentary regime." Smith "This is a proposi- tion that should appeal to our com- mon sense. I-'or yenrs we have tried to appease Russia. We have found it won't work. Turkey Fnr Sale Against Representative Bender (R "Isn't it true that Turkey is for sale to thc highest For Representative Dikscn (R.- "I've heard that kind of non- sense before. Turkey performed one of the greatest services in the last war. She shut off the short route for thc German eastward conquest. Turkey stood her ground." In addition to the move to substi- tute a resolution lor United Nation number of other proposals have been advanced tentatively, i among them: To strike any aid to Turkey. A cut in the amount of money for tho program. A limitation on the size of the military missions to be sent the two countries. A requirement that any aid to Greece be confined to civilian relief only. graph jumped completely oil the paper and one broke, putting the machine out ol operation. He estimated the tremor, however, at about one-half second duration. At the University Chicago, Sta- tion Director William Schmidt said that earth tremors lasting clijht minutes were recorded Jn the vicin- ity of Kenosha or Milwaukee on the Chicago seismograph Post Office Department Warns of Lottery Laws The Post Office department, saying there lias been a "decided increase" :n violations Strongest Since 1912 Five Counties Feel 1 w Jar; Only Minor LOUlSe Damage Reported Milwaukee An earthquake, possibly resulting from shifting rock deep in the earth below Milwau- kee, shook communities throughout southern Wisconsin at p. rn. yesterday. The Rev. Joseph Carroll, S.J., head the physics department at Marquette university, said he be- lieved it was the first quake ever to have originated In Wisconsin, although he said he had heard legends of a similar tremor "some- time around 1700." 9 Singer, Succumbs Oklahoma Cit -Scn.itor Tom Anglin of Holdcnvllle was shot on thc floor of the senate here today. The extent of Anglm's was not determined Immediately. The 63-year-old veteran senator remained on his feet after thc shoot- ing and said. "I'm shot In thc bock." Senator Louis II. Rltzhaupt, of Guthrie, a physician, rushed to Aiiglin's assistance and an ambu- lance was called. Xo -immediate reason was given for thc shooting. Thc senate was not In session nt the time, but numerous senators, employes and visitors were on the floor. Senator Tom Fmncy of Idabol said Representative Jlmniie Scott, o- Holdcnville was the assailant. Senators took Scott to thc offico of PresJdent Pro Tcmpore James C. Nance but he declined to make a. statement. "I don't want to talk until I have seen a lawyer." Scott said. "I wanj to be arrested and see a lawyer.' Ritzhaupt said Angiln's wound apparently was not serious. j. William Cordcll, secretary of the senate and an eyewitness. Anglin's assailant -walked Into thc senate nnd Anglin cried out, "Dom Thc man fired nt Anglin twice, Cordell said, although only one wound was discovered In Ar.glin'a body. Long Wait for Change in Auto Models Forecast Madame Louise Homer Winter Tark, Mil, Funeral services for Mrs. Sidney Homer, who aa Madame Louise Homer was a leading contralto of the Metropoli- tan Opera Company for more than two decades, were planned for to- day in the Rollins college chapel. Mrs. Homer, 70, died of a heart ailment yesterday. Mrs. Homer had been ill about five weeks. Her husband, soli and four daughters were here at the time of her death. Her debut was at San director ,t Francisco November 1-1, 1900, and arLoTolaVniveStVchlcago. said then she scored a series of triumphs the school's seismograph recorded nt thc Metropolitan. Her singing 'A small quake about 80 miles Chicago" and added nmited chiefly to French and t n unU1 lhc scason ol when there was a quake in the Rock- ford-Prccport-Chicago area." Father Carroll said he believed yesterday's tremor was caused by tilting rock along the lake shoic line with a possible vertical crack somewhere slightly southeast of since the war, Issued a reminder to- day that it is against the law to use the malls to promote lotteries. A department statement said this applied to binRO games, raffles and similar enterprises, us well as larg- er lotte.i-les such as sweepstakes. Violations carry a maximum pen- alty ol fine and two years imprisonment. Offenders also may Milwaukee. In an interview Father Carroll described an earthquake as "na- ture's way of letting off energy and said It was a blessir.g that it had happened at the present time because If It had happened later It would have been more Intense. He said there was "no possible danger of a recurrence." be denied delivery of mall. The search for the vessel and tho persons aboard was closed of- ficially, with searchers having failed to find n single clue as to the tiny coastal vessel's fate. The ship, owned by-a British firm lert Rangoon April 17. Harbor au- thorities here received one message from her, saying she was encoun- tering heavy eyelonlc weather. Disposable Plastic Dishes Proposed retailing execu- tive today urged thu plastics indus- try to develop a disposable set of plastic dishes that could be dumped in the garbage pail for no more than the cost of a movie. In an address prepared for the annual convention of thc Society of the Plastics Industry, Harry A. Earth of the W. T. Grant Company, New York, asked: "Why doesn't thc plastics industry develop a disposable set of plastic dishes? There is no drudgery which women hate more than washing dishes. Thc plastics Industry should solvo this ciylflE need." President Miguel Aleman of Mexico was entertained at the Chat- nirnnrf. nrior to flvlnc to Muscle Shoals, Ala., for a tanooga.-Tenn., airport prior to flying to Muscl tour of TV A project by Duke, a trained horse owned by Turner a reVired Policeman. Duko holds the Mexican and American flags to his mouth. -Man at left acted as interpreter for the presi- dent. (A.P. Wlrephoto.) 1902 when she developed In Wag- ncrian roles, notably Ortund in Venus In "Tannhau- Erda in "Siegfried" and Fricka In "Die Walkure." Azucena in and Brangaem In Isolde." Weather By David .T. Associated Tress Automotive Editor If it's n IMS mout. automobfln you w.int you may 11.1 well resign yourself to a long wait. The merchandising division of tha auto industry Is being plagued rtgra now for a Hood of inquiries as to when the 1948 models will be avail- able; many persons with orders now on lllc or about to place them are seeking to specify delivery of 1943 model, but tho retailors have or no information as to when these will Ijecome available. Currently there are no indications of any major model changes before the latter part of December. Hera and there In thc industry a manu- facturer may bring out a car of ad- vanced design during the summer months and put a 1948 label on it, but so far as has been disclosed every car maker nas a tentative schedule of current model output, and although record-breaking pro- duction volume is Indicated for tJis third and fourth quarters of the year, each will need most if not all the volume he can attain from now through the remainder of the ycgr to rlll Ws production. production prospects for the next the none too II Travatorc jactonps turned out Tristan nna I approximately 315.000 !cars and truck in April. i There Is little likelihood. May out- will so much aoove that, Jlgurc. Other roles In which she was dnys. according to some of acclaimed were: Laura m "Ln. Glo-l ]oftdlnK manufacturers, are. none FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnona and Fair quite and the! Hunt for Missing Girl Continues Fort Atkinson. Wis. Weary law enforcement officials were "Just waiting for a lucky break" today after another day of fruitless search- ing for eight-year-old Georgia Jean Weckler who disappeared from a road near her home last Thursday. A few of thc volunteer searchers, who have covered the surrounding area, still were poking about the brush, following their own hunches, but officially the Investi- gation was at a stalemate. Under Sheriff George Schrc.bcr said last night there were "no new clues, no new leads, no new develop- District Attorney Francis Garity said thc search for thc girl, who is believed to have been abducted, has brought us no iurthcr than wo were the day she disappeared." He said We arc Just waiting, lor a The district attorney added "We're still working completely in thc dntk. We've covered every inch of ground In a ten-mile radius without find- Ing a single a. scrap of clothing, not a letter or a piece of paper from the mall we know she was "We might have been walking right over something, but I don't see how. We've turned over rubbish heaps, hay mows, and gone under corn cribs, all without result." Sheriff George Perry said that tips still were being received about the whereabouts of a black sedan re- portedly seen driving out of the f arm road a few minutes after thc Rirl en- tered the road, but none of these. cool tonight, frost in coulees; low in the city 36, near freezing in rural areas. Thursday, fair and warmer: high C2. Minnesota: Increasing cloudiness in north portion tonight and In south portion Thursday. Light snow alone northern border tonlnht, and rain or snow noith portion Thurs- day Showers in .southwest portion Thursday night; not quite so cold west and central portions tonight. Slowly rising temperature Thurs- day, except little change near Lake Superior. Wisconsin: Fair and unseason- ably cool tonight, freezing tempera- tures and killing frost. Thursday fair and not quite .so cool. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum. 48; minimum. 37; noon, 48- precipitation. .16 of an inch; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max, Min. Pet. Chicago Denver Kansas City Los Angeles Miami Mpls.-St. Paul New Orleans....... Phoenix............ Few Senate Changes in Tax Bill Seen Perry said, value. I has proved to be of Seattle 52 65 G9 71 51 87 .106 80 38 40 40 M 71 33 CO C7 50 .15 .46 bill Hy J. Krlly iisliiiiKton Top Republi- ns on I lie Senate finanrr tee indicated loday that, few c are likely In Vhe "20-30" Urn cuttliiR Individual income sonic a year. Chairman Milllkin ill. -Colo.'" summoned the committee :r.to n. session behind closed doors 10 bcRiri de-lulled consideration of the legis- lation. In two weeks of open hear- ings the group heard recommenda- tions of the plan from industrial- ists, heavy criticism of it from the C.I.O., and declaration acainst any tax reduction whatever at tills time from Secretary of the Treas- ury John W. Snyder. Minikin said there Is no doubt Red Wing Reads WJnona (C.P.) 13 thc Senate committee will take the House bill as a pattern, but he also noted that i.herc is a wide differ- ence ol opinion as to when the cut should tnkc clfect. The House bill would mnkc the reduction retroactive to la.st Janu- ,iivy 3, but important elements w'.lh- in" the committee eonlend !he d-i'o .Jshould be set forward :o July J. the start ot a new fiscal yenr. 24-Hr A Democratic member of the Stage Today Change I committee. Senator Lucas of 14 10.5 H- -1'nols, is pressing for a subst.tutn J2 ___I which among other things would nllow husbands and wives in ail RIVEK BULLETIN Flood Stngo 10.C La Crosse 12 10.3 Tributary Streams Black at NcillsvilJe ..4.7 states to split their incomes for tas i purposes. .21 They now are allowed to co so :n "RIVER FORECAST jonly nine states with community SISi-rs s sential decisions this week and send a bill to 
                            

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