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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: April 1, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 1, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER Urhl rhln eJciutljr 117. s Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY Read nin New Column Dally on Editorial VOLUME 47. NO. 37 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING. APRIL I. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Council, A. of C. Clash on Sewer Issue George II Of Greece Dies at 56 Prince Paul to Succeed Brother on Balkan Throne 15y nlmltrl Travlos George II died tirK-xpf-cU'dly today of n hoart all- rntT.t a critical period of his na- history, and til.-: 45-yenr-old brother. Prince I'uul WILS culled to t.V- thronr. Tin- fiC-ycar-tild king hatl been complaining recently of pain from pj-ctorls, uti ailment arising from a disease of the coronary arteries, former Premier George Papiinarou Mild. Piiparidrou sale the monarch cllrrl n. in. Paul wius to take the royal nt noon. It was an- nounced that the poverr.ment and Paul would I.-AUP to tin- The d'TiUi of kH'.K crime six utter his r i-1 n r n to hl.s from Lon- don nfter n ple- biscite favo ring th" monarchy. He died nt a time when the ex- plosive "Greek cjucs'.lon" was be- inc debated in and N. Y. to Florida KJnjr Grorro II Jn trie capitals of world, and when his country's Moody guerrilla warfare was being investigated by a United Nations corr.rr.lr.xton. Took Ovrr In 1S22 GrorKC took over the reign of Grcvce in U'22. When his father Constantino, abdlcntecl In 1D17. George was barred from the throne "Shocked Surprise" IJrltlsh for- ricn office spokesman expressed shocked surprise today at of the death of Kins Gcorcc II nt Jlr -mill there would he no Immediate official com- ment, and he declined to specu- late about the possible political effect. 'Just Started Out and Kept Says Bus Driver Hollywood, Fla. The driver of a 44-pawicnger bun from the Bronx was in jail liiirn today while authorities who Impounded hlx empty con- veyance when they took him Into custody awaited word from New York 0.1 to what disposi- tion will be made la (he case. Police Chief Philip A. Thom- son Identified the driver as 37- year-old William Lawrence f.'lmlllo of the Bronx, N. Y. Clmlllo gave no reason why he started out .on a routine run Friday morning and Wound up In Hollywood, more than miles away. Married and the father of two children, Clmlllo said he "just started out and kept He added that "The fellows at the bus company will under- Ntand, I'm sure." "I didn't know where I wan headed Florida, Mexico, Cali- fornia I could have wound up any ho nald. "It just happened that I hit highway No. 1 and wound up In Florida." "One tlilnc I want you lo get clear: I haven't had any trouble at home. I've pot a swell wife and three .swell Clmlllo was taken Into cus- tody at the Gulfstream park race track where he said he went to "see If I couldn't scrape up some money." Huge Clouds Of Smoke rise from Mount Hekla near Reykjavik, Iceland. The peak, erupting loT tne flrst tlmc since 1U45, has spread thousands of tons of lava, rocks and ashes over a wide area, making coastal navigation difficult and polluting drinking water. (A.P. Wlrephoto.) Request to Have Project Plans Checked by Engineers Tabled because the Allies feared he had pro-German leaning. Ills brother, Alexander, became King. Alexander died from the bite of n pet monkey in 1920. and Constantino returned to thr throne. But Grivcc again by hard times and Con- KUintinr. In 1022. had to abdicate acii'.n. George succeeded hltn. Soon KTUTward he faced his first pre- biscite. was defeated, nnd u-cnt Into Village Revision Measure Gets Preliminary O.K. St. complete re- vision of Minnesota's village Jaws .since 1005 was Riven preliminary approval by the house Tuesday as the senate took similar action on a measure which would allow six com- munities in dry Polk county to bal- lot on municipal liquor stores. The village laws overhaul, long jnn objective of the Minnesota league of Municipalities, will serve to "bring order out of' Representa- tive Walter Rogcsheskc, 8auk Ra- pids, Its chief author, declared. The now setup, he explained, will make these three forms of local govern- ment optional to villages of more than The same plan they now have, except that tho clerk, treasurer and assessor would be council-appointed, with an additional trustee to be elected In plnce of the clerk; a council-manager plan, or a commis- sion plan. Villages of fewer than Truman Signs, Flays Sugar Control Bill exile !vs Greece became a republic.! would be restricted to the first. exile lasted 13 years. He was recalled by a plebiscite in llulscs Money The bill also raises from to 1935 when the Royalists staxcd a S300 the amount of goods that may coup d'ptat, and rplfmod but did notjbe purchased by villages without of John the necessity of calling for bids. The Polk county liquor 'Store bill The king went into exile, again j won a 41-23 victory from the sen- Germany Invaded his country titf, sitting as a committee of the The dictatorship was in power. GKOKGK II (Contlnurd on Pace It. Column 0) wordy debate. Senator I Julius Spokcly, Crookston, said com- affected will be Crookston, East Grand Forks, Fosston, Ersklne, Fertile and Mclntosh. Chairman E. J. Windmlllcr of the house veterans committee, said he Weather FEDERALFOKKCASTS Wlnona and vicinity: Linht rain early becoming partly cloudy Wednesday. No 1m- portant chance in temperature. Low tonlcht Wednesday 411. Minnesota: Partly cloudy to- nnd Wednesday. Slowly rl.'i-, irinpf-raturc.s Wednesday. Mo.stly cloudy with, occasional llKht rain ending early had called a special meeting of that frroup for 8 p. m. today to discuss death gratuity payments and cer- tain other phases of the committee- approved state bonus bill, providing payments of up to Child Labor A child labor bill, two of whose authors arc Representative Carl By Sterling F. Green Sugar ration Ing gained a new seven-month on life today, but President Tru of "disastrous eco nomlc consequences" from such short extension announced h might seek longer controls. The sugar act. which also carrie sugar price control to October 31 was approved by Congress yesterda along with a 90-day extension o the president's power to parcel ou a sharply trimmed list of industrial drug and food items. Mr. Truman signed both bills. In time to prevent the entire suga and, allocation program from laps Ing along with the second war pow ers act, Signs 'With Reluctance' But Mr. Truman said he penned his signature "with reluctance" on the sugar bill because Congress ap- parently Is counting on more great- ly improved sugar supplies "than those now definitely in prospect." "I should like to emphasize the fact that sugar supplies in the United States normally approach n low level early In the his state- ment said. "If controls arc ended October 31, the situation may be as dangerous as If they had been al- lowed to lapse today." If this proves likely, Mr. Truman added, he will "ask the Congress to Inasmuch as some members "clearly recognized" the dangerous possibilities during de- bate on the bill. No Change Now No change in sugar rations or regulation will be made for the present, Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson announced. He took over the program today, in line with Congress' mandate relieving OPA of the Job, but he set up a new "sugar rationing administration" In the department made up of OPA's former sugar staff. The bill provides 20 pounds of sugar a person for the next seven months, or an annual rate of 35 Miners Leave Work in Memorial To Centralia Dead By The Associated Prcsi John L. Lewis' United Mine' Work- ers quit their soft coal pits today beginning a six-day stoppage to me- morialize the tragic deaths of 111 Centralia (Hi.) miners. The A.F.L.-TI.M.W." mem- bers began- the mourning period at one minute after midnight starting Dugan Statement The following communication from John W. Dugan, president of ;he city council and first ward alder- man, was read at last night's coun- cil meeting: Passage of the referendum on sanitary sewers'., bonds Is the most mportant matter that has con- fronted the city of Wlnona for generations. So far no particular effort has been made to inform, the public, either through newspaper jubllcity or otherwise, of the neces- ilty of this program for the present 'equirements and future growth of he city. I have been Informed by til Jty engineer's office that there or till on file 102 out of 175 appji :ants In dire need of housing. Mos of these people ore living eithe with their in-laws or friends. Th city of Wlnonn, through the Fedcni Public Housing authority, has fur nishcd temporary housing to 4 veterans' families, the State Teach crs college to 30, St. Mary's to 2 family units, or a total of 90 famii lies that have been provided tern porary shelter. This alone indicate a need of 200 Immediate housing units. Accusations Charge Committee Room Air As Business Leaders, Aldermen Debate Disregarding an ultimatum, of the'Wlnona Association of Commerce, the city council Monday night voted, 0 to 3, to flic without action the demand of the association that the council hire a consulting engineer to check the sewer extension project plans of the city engineer. The action came after a heated session which saw tempers flare over the stand of the association that unless the council sub- mitted to its demand it would "publicize (its) viewpoint and ac- tively oppose passage of the proposed bond issue." Third Ward Aldermen William Theurer and Robert Albrecht and Second Ward Alderman Joseph Dottle voted against tabling of the request, while Council President John W. Dugan, First Ward Alderman Ben Deeren, Second Ward Alderman Walter! Dopke, Fourth Ward Aldermen Daniel Bambenek and Stanley Wleczorek and Alderman-at-Large Robert Dorsch voted to file A. of C. Statement the request. May Change Minds 400 to 500 in Need on the East coast and extend! the Pacific through, the tlmc.' All was quiet in the nation's an- thracite miners, too. The hard coal miners laid aside licks and shovels for traditional lollday observances, celebrating the miners' winning of the eight-hour day nearly a half-century ago. But a black shroud hovered over all proceedings. Memorial services vere the main parts of mining com- munity programs. Industry, in the main, seemed un- perturbed. No coal-dependent firms vere expected to curtail production. Lewis' timing of the "holiday" owes In a period when little coal Is irought to the surface. Miners traditionally don't work prll 1, and few work Holy Thurs- ny or Good Friday. Saturday nor- mally Is a day off. Wednesday, hen, Is the only day In which fa reduction Is lost. Scattered Workers Only In a scattered few Illinol lafts, manned by members of th regressive Mine Workers (inde was industry-vital bitum lous coal reaching the surface. Even so, 2.000 members of the As you all know, there are mans others In a similar position. A., an estimate there probably are 40C to 500 in need of housing in the city of Winona and the figure may easily reach In ten years. If we provide proper utility services It Is reasonable to expect that these homes would be built In the city limits nnd would return very sub- stantial tax revenue. The growth and development of the city of 'Winona are directly dependent on the extension of sewer and obher utility services. As you know, "there are several resi- dential developments the city nnd in addition a building pro- (Continued on Page 13, Column 3) DUG AN Plan for Spain Expected to Get Full Approval Madrid Overwhelming par- liamentary approval was forecast ;oday for Generalissimo Francisco Franco's proposal to declare that Spain, although her throne lias been vacant for 16 years, Is still a mon- archy and to outline procedure for_____ ___ __ __ _____ ____ selecting the country's next 1945 found vacancies irTrentaf units An original motion was made by the majority to oppose the hir- ing of a consultant engineer, but before the vote had been com- pleted President Dugan suggested that the motion be rephrased merely to file the association's letter. He added, "We may change our mind, about a consulting en- gineer, so lot's just file tho letter." The filing of the association's letter came after a three-hour session with association leaders and other civic leaders, most of whom had come to the meeting at the request of Roy T. Patncaude to discuss with the council promotion of the bond issue election next Monday. The association's public stand was a surprise to most of those present. The meeting, instead, became an argument, which at times degenerated into name-calling, over whether the city council should hire a consultant engineer for the sewer extensions and lift stations. Accusations of "insincerity" charged the meeting room. It saw at least two members ol the association opposing its board of directors on the procedure it had employed in presenting its views. They were Alderman Dopke and Ex-Mayor William A. Galewski, who Is co-chairman of Hie association's airport com- mittee. Prank Under Fire However, It was City Engineer Carl W. Frank who was under fire most of the meeting. At one point C. Paul Venables, president of the association, said, "When a business- man plans to build a million dollar building, you don't hire a carpenter to draw the plans. It's the same way on the sewers." The city engineer rose to Ills feet, interrupting the association president, "Excuse me, Mr. Vena- 3les, but I happen to be a register- ed engineer in Minnesota. I am no a carpenter." Frank, who wns ordered by the council in 1946 to draw plans for the extensions and lift stations, de- clared, "I've handled a lot of sewer obs and some of them of this magnitude. If anybody from the association wants to come up and examine my plans, I would welcome it. I'd be willing to Rive them all the time they need to understand Truman Asks Year's Extension Of Rent Control Tru- man today asked Congress to ex- end rent controls a year beyond he present June 30 expiration, date. In a message to the two houses, Si. Truman said tho nation "is till faced with a critical housing nnd that rental units articularly "are still radically cut f balance with demand." The President's message went to ongress as the House banking ommittce voted tentatively for ai ten per cent Increase in rent ceil-' ing-s nnd to repeal all government controls over building materials and construction. The following letter from the board of directors of the Associa- tion of Commerce was read at last night's council meeting: The board of directors of the Wl- nona Association of Commerce Is very much interested In. and con- corned over your proposal to make alterations and additions to our existing sewer system. We feel the citizens of Winona will, to a cer- tain extent, rely on the leadership and attitude of this association, nnd we are addressing you because we are conscious of the responsi- bility of our position. We nrc in complete mcnl with you in your desire to provide o. srwor system ade- quate for our immediate needs with reasonable provision to handle the load (hat the future jfrowlli of the city may placa upon thf.s system. Your require- ments, therefore, arc for a plan which best fulfills our present and future needs, the total cost of which is within our power to amortize. We understand that your pro- posed plan is based solely upon a study nnd estimate of costs pre- pared by the city engineer. As a check upon the adequacy of thu proposed plan nnd the correctness of the estimated cost, we feel that lie city of Winona should employ firm of consultlnR engineers, spe- i.ilixiiifr in this type of work, to mice .111 Independent survey of our requirements; to prepare gen- eral plans designed to fulfill our icods; and to furnish, detailed es- .imates of the cost of construction, jnsed upon general plans. Program Suggested It would have been preferable to your proposal for additional The President Said a survey in 881 the objectives of the council in .pounds, ten pounds more than largest Bcnld year. It sets aside tons clfcct backed the Lewis or- new Industrial users, and continues dcr for national mourning among N. S'-: Wednesday part.lv 'cloudy j D'Aquila. Hlbblng, and Dwlght .-I..- Swanstrom, Duluth, was Introduced. It is designed, they said, to curtail among other things the employ- ment of children under 14 as news- boys because "there's too much doz- ing at school desks by kids who work long hours out of school." Declaring "there arc other things o: much greater Importance than anti-slot machine bills now before .Yo'itho legislature, 'Senator William L. 21 _ _ I Montgomery, last night called Ifor early action on bills proposing 7.1 veterinary college at the University 3r> .09.of Minnesota and for construction a poultry and animal husbandry 34 building on the farm school campus. ,'ind ii little cooler. I.OCAI, m.ATHKU OfT.ciii! observations for the 24 hours ctidlnt: fit 12 m. today: Maximum. 37: minimum, 34; noon. 27. Ion. .nfi of un Inch of sun t.i-Lx nt fi'.'J'J; tomorrow Max. Mln. Pel. inventory controls until next March 31, to prevent, big Industrial users miners. They refused to work and voted S7.800 to families of the 111 from hoarding supplies once blast victims. rationing ends. And from Washington came posl- The delayed-action legislative indications that Congress was Ancclfs .inv, Paul. .v York 70 41 threw a sizeable part of the gov- ernment Into an uproar from which It had not fully recovered today. The biggest question was whether grain, rice, meat and other agricul- tural products could continue to be parceled out for domestic, military and foreign consumption. They were not singled out by name as were tin, antimony, freight cars, pushing its probe of mine condi- tions under federal operation. Secretary of Interior J. A. Krug working an a report to the Senate investigating committee, indicated it mny be submitted .sometime dur- ing the day. Meantime, officials of the Solid Fuel administration said production of soft coal was 20 per cent yes- cordage, cinchona bark for quinine'terday as numerous miners "jump- "There are laws right now pro- W> slot machines, Dletz said. 6.'i yo pretty much a matter of r.l'M.irriN local enforcement. If the people stiiKt; 24-Hr. want them barred, they can accom- Today Change jjll.sh It, under present statutes. It 14 4. to mo there arc many other City......... 7. .2 things of much greater importance." 12 H.8 Boys Rescued .liFrom Ice Floe Apple-ton, grade school boys, trapped on an ice floe drifting in the Pox river, were res- cued yesterday. The boys had been playing on the c when a section split from the main icefield. Police Officer Joseph .SJBroulllard and n spectator pushed .2 a boat to mid-river and propelled T.W C. Poo! 'I. T.W 7, Poo! 7. T.W C.-ti'w 41 -I .B and the drug streptomycin. Certified Products As the Agriculture departmcn sweated this out, Bcpresentatlv Springer gave a last minute explanation on the floor o the House: He said the food .stuff could be classed among the "mate rials and facilities" which remain subject to control If the Sccretarlei of State and Commerce certify thai allocation is necessary to meet this country's ments. International commit- :u: L'.G l.C Tributary Streams nt Uunmd.. if.urnbro at Thoilman. above Alma... Tri.Tnpoa.Ifau nt Dodge Eljicfc at Nol'.lsvllk'.. 4.G El.-u-i: at Galr.ivllle___ 3.9 Crowe at W. Salem 1.8 P.ool n: Houston....... 0.0 KIVKIl FORECAST 'From to Guttc 'iuring the next 30 hours upper will rise silently from Genoa :o No. 10; rbi-whrro there will iio important c-hanc'1 except H n.'.c throughout the district indicated by the weekend. the ice Hoc to shore. The boys were Kenneth Diener, Manley and Lyle Bert, Richard Dceg, and Ronald -f- .1 -I- .2 .1 Junior Ellcnbeckcr .4 Wydeven. -h .C.' Faribault Infant Dies of Suffocation A. Nuetz- man said the death of Marilyn. In- fant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Llndciulst of Rlchland township, was due to suffocation in her crib. The Commerce department weni to work with the 'State department lo draft a list of "certified" products The list had not been announced by the midnight deadline but at last accounts It contained these world- scarcity items: Grain, flour and groin products; rice and rice products; soap and soap powder; fats and oils and mix- tures thereof; butter; meat and meat products; beans and nuts; fatty acids; oil-bearing seeds; oil cakes nnd oil-cake meals; dry beans and peas; ammonium nitrate for export. The Civilian Production adminis- tration meanwhile unloaded its en- of construction controls, regulations and building tire kit housing material orders in nil Housing Expediter Frank R. Crecdon. The Solid Fuels administration, governing coal distribution, lost its power and was scheduled to go out of business. cd the gun" on the memorial holi- day. Violation of Mandate? If the stoppage continued through next Monday, would it be consid- ered a violation of a Supreme court mandate? That remained a biff and S.F.A. officials had no answer. The nation's highest tribunal or- dered Lewis to withdraw an order for a stoppage that was to have begun last same time as the ordered memorial period. When he complied, a fine levied against the union for contempt of court in connection whether king or regent. The measure was introduced in the Cortes (parliament) last night on the eve of Spain's "Victory tho eighth anniversary celebratior of Franco's victory In the civil wo' Approval was assured by the fac that an overwhelming majority o the Cortes members were selectc by the Franco government. The proposal, In the form of decree, was read over nil Spanisl radio stations yesterday following a 35-minute speech by Franco, whlc] was devoted mainly to his economic cities by the Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics and of the census during "virtually nonexistent." '5 Bushfield Warns of World War III a speech op- posing President Truman's request for aid to Greece and Turkey, Sen- ator Bushfleld (R.-S. D.1 Monday told the Senate, "The u. S. is head- ideas and to a denunciation He declared that rest of the world had finally joinci lilm in hating and fearing com munlsm. No Tenure of Office The measure did not. however, fb any tenure of office for Franco its 'chief of state" and presumably would leave him power for the rcsl of his life if he wished it. He it low 54 years old. An authoritative source, who pre- dicted lust week that such a pro- losal was forthcoming-, xakl it was designed mainly for its effect on the outside world. To provide the method for choos- ng his successor, Franco went back nto history and suggested recon- tltution of the "council of the king- which Spanish kings for cnturlcs appointed to determine the uccession in case of doubt. As outlined by the generalissimo, he council would consist of 12 pcr- ons, eight ol them picked by him, Quail fixations The proposal says the next ruler f Spain's should be of oyal blood, male, over 30 years old, panish. a Roman Catholic and a upporter of the fundamental laws ecrced by the Franco regime. Franco himself may propose a suc- cessor at any time, or if he -should die or become incapacitated the approving this plan. "But the only member of the association board of directors who has been up is Anderson (A. J. Anderson, arid he didn't seem very interested in the project." No Reflections Intended Venables and Anderson, however, repeatedly said that the associa- tion's letter was intended as no reflection on the city engineer. Said Anderson, "I have n high ing once more for a world war and I am opposed to this loan or gift by whatever name it Is called." He said the Republican party believes now and always has In "refraining from meddling in the affairs of othtr countries." Sugar Stamp 11 Valid Today Washington Spare ra- tion stamp No. 11 was validated today for another ten pounds of Mitfar to each household con- sumer. Ol'A said the stamp will lie pood through 30. Stamp No. 53, which provide a five-pound allowance, expired last night. OPA previously had an- nounced that another stamp good for ten pounds probably would be validated July 1, with a third one likely to be made (rood arounrt October 1. personal regard for and Venables declared, "Believe me th.it no member of the board of directors lias ever said anything about Carl u> which he would object. This request is no reflection upon his ability." tho association presi- dent continued, "we represent n. group of businessmen, and business- men believe in consultation. That's nil we're asking. We want to spend sewer facilities before the voters, based the report of the con- ulting engineer selected. Since the matter lii-s itlrcady been placed upon the ballot for the next gen- eral election, we suggest that in jpcn meeting- on March 31, 1947, publicly pledge yourselves to the following- proRi'.im, in the event that this issue is approved by the voters April 7, 3947: (1) Prior to nny further nctioii leading to the construction of additions or alterations to our sewer system, we will employ the best available firm of consulting: engineers specializing in municipal sanitary engineering to make an independent survey of our sewer S3'stem; to prepare general plans in solution of our present needs with provision for reasonable future growth of the city; and to furnish detailed estimates of the cost of construction of the facilities out- lined In the aforesaid general plans. (2) In the event that the esti- mated cost of construction, includ- ng provision for the future growth of the city, as prepared by the consulting engineer exceeds the maximum bonded indebtedness re- cently authorized, by the legislature subject to the approval of the voters of the city of Winona. we vill resubmit the matter to the in a special or general elec- .ion before proceeding with .any port, of the project. wish to assure you of our dexirn to cooperate in every way possible, but our convictions in this matter arc such that unless you publicly nnd voluntarily -commit yourselves as outlined above by n. smnJJ amount" of moncv to verify APril 2v wc fccl jt duty Frank's plans" to PubJicizc our viewpoint and to His desire for a consultant wasjacLiVcly passage of the pro- reiterated by Patncftudc, who '5OSOd bond lssue- stated, "I don't think there's any criticism of you Carl. If there were more people who knew you like we know you, they would have more confidence. I've heard so-called bis shots make statements showing they didn't know what they were talking about." Patneaudo, who headed the pro- motion committee before the coun- (Continued on Page 12, Column 2) CLASH Chicago Race to Be Straw In '48 Presidential Polls with last fall's 17-day strike was council of tho kingdom, by two- roflnnori tn tTAd nnn ...i-i_j._ ___u ___ Chicago's mayora lection contest between two poll- en! newcomers drew national at- cntion today in n. major test of arty strength preliminary to the reduced to Lewis said he was legally cm- powered to call the memorial stop- it was authorized by n clause in the union's 1941 contract with the operators and had carried over in every succeeding, pact. It was never used Lewis declared, because of wartime de- mands for coal. However, Walter Thurmond, sec- of the Southern Coal Opera- ors association at Charleston, W. Va., flatly called the six-day mourn- ng adding: "Lewis was forestalled by the ourts in his attempted strike as f April 1 and this ostensible mourn- ng period is only n method of wringing to pass by subterfuge what' he could not accomplish by direct thirds vote, would propose a can- didate to the Cortes, which in turn would be required to approve by the same margin. Neither the law nor Franco's 1948 presidential battle. With more than voters, Republican anj Democratic party leaders considered the results would give them their first indica- tion of how'the political winds arc speech mentioned Don Juan, the son blowing- since last November's con- of Spam's last king and the present gressional election. so-called or any other candidate lor the job of succeeding Franco. Don Juan is not barred, however, and he has the support of most of Spain's monarchists, but a mon- archist spokesman already has voiced criticism of the Franco pro- posal. Some of the supporters of Don Juan, who has publicly withdrawn his support of the Franco regime. Democrats have been in power in Chicago for thu last 16 years and their big city vote was a major factor in giving Illinois' 28 electoral votes to the late President Roosevelt four times. However, the Republi- cans, headed by Governor Dwight H. Green, won 14 of 17 offices in Cook county (Chicago) lost Novem- ber and they have waged a deter- mined campaign to win control of the city hall. said It was Juan's cue to denounccj Carroll .Reecc, Republican na- Franco again and also the new suc-i tional chairman, said the election cession plan. of the Republican candidate, Rus- sell W. Root, would be a second major step to electing a G.O.P. president next year. He said the first step was achieved in last fall's general- election. Root, 48-year-old attorney nnd assistant state treasurer, Is op- posed by Martin H. Kennclly, 50- year-old businessman and civic lender. Both are seeking their first elective office, a job which pays annually for four years. The mayor also has control of the city Hall and its jobs and political of the nation's second largest Kennelly was selected by the Democratic, organization after May- or Edward J. Kelly, 70 and now completing his record 14-year ten- ure, announced his retirement. Although showers were forecast a turnout of between and voters was predicted. There ire contests for aldermen in 19 of .he city's SO wards and voters also will elect a city clerk, and city treasurer. 13 Police Face Charges of Immoral Conduct Providence, R. J. Thirteen Providence policemen face charges of immoral conduct involving night- ly trysts with women in city-owned Roger Williams park. The charges wore brought yes- terday by the bureau of police and lire only n. fe.w weeks after two Other Providence officers were ar- rcstctl for allegedly conspiring with a gang of burglars, three of whose members were ambushed and shot to death by police in a roadside res- tnurant. Pending a hearing April 8. 13 were suspended. not allowed in the park after JO p. in. and a cruiser makes nightly rounds to enforce tho ban. Wausau Youth Crushed to Death Wausau, Wis. Dennis Oelkc. 18, town of Stettin, was killed yes- terday when lie was crushed "be- tween n retaining wtUl and a log which skidded off a flat car. Oelke was removing logs from the car. Red River Area Sends Potatoes to Europe Grand Forks, X. D. With weekend loading of 266 cars, ship- ments of Red River valley potatoes for export to Eiirojjc reached cars Monday night, headquarters here reported. 3   

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  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
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Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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