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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 28, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 28, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY Read nix New- Column Dally on Editorial PaBo VOLUME 47, NO. 34 WINONA. MINNESOTA. FRIDAY EVENING. MARCH 28. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Greek Aid Backs U.N., Austin Claims Sugar Bill Returned to House ouse Adopted in Senate by 46-34 Vote Amended Measure Would Continue Controls to Oct. 31 Senate sen briri: to the House with minor today a bill to continue rationing and price contro October 31, House already has approver the seven-month extension from Monthly, when present controls 1: will br a.'.ked to accept Senate (1) Guaranteeing 3 o.' i.uRar per person for i.orr.e use this year and 50 pounds If r.-io-jch I- available and (2) Setting n.'.icif M.OOO tons for new industrial ii'.c.-s. individual users received 25 round.', nplccr in 104C. I'.itlcr Debate Party lines meant little as the Senate- adopter! the bill lost night, to 04. nftcr bitter debate In which Wfiawj.- fR.-.V. 11.) predicted action may bring about a "na- tional xcandal" by encouraging KU- pn.- hoarding, Rambling and proflt- r-rrlng. Declaring the extension should have boon for a full year, Tobcy as M-rtcd the bill puts speculators "on notice when they can make the On final pa.v.ago lt> 27 Republicans for approval Aciiinst thr bill were 20 Republicans of whom preferred killing nu- control.-, outright, and 14 Demo- crat r.. The clinching vote como after thr defeat, 44 to 38, of a Domo- rrntlc-sponsored attempt to send the fcil! back to committee. Brttrr Than None When this maneuver failed, Dem- ocratic Leader Barkley (Ky.) an- nounced he was voting for passaore of the measure rather than have all controls end when the prcs- law expires. The measure would put rationing In the hands of the secretary of Rescue Work Is More Perilous As Squads Go Deeper Into Mine ivirrlculture and empower him to out controls any time he aces Soon after tile voting. Senator IHutlrr   Issued a statement farmers to "plant sugar beets itif limit, now that they know will come off of sugar r.exc October nnd they will get n prxx! price." vote by which the Senate to- preset! the bill Included: Ball, Thye, Thli the scene at the Centrnlla Coal Company No, 5 mine In Centralia, 111., where many were killed when a blast rocked the workings March 25. (A.P. Wirephoto.) Centralla, work- ers who said simply "It's getting dangerous for us down there" struggled today to complete their exploration of the coal mine in which 111 were believed killed In nn Lewis Blames Krug for 'Murder9 of Coal Miners Washington John L. Lewis said today the "111 coal miners, more or less" who lost their lives In the Ccntralla, 111., mlno explosion "have been murdered because ot the criminal negligence of J. A. Krug." Lewis, president of the AJ'JL.-Unlted Mine Workers, testified briefly at a Senate public lands subcommittee considering the nomi- nation of James Boyd, dean of the Colorado School of Mines, to be the. Bureau of Mines, Lewis said the 'appointment was made by President Truman through Krue, secretary of the interior, and asked the committee and the Con- gress not to confirm Boyd. Lewis had listened to Boyd tell of his qualifications ond when Boyd was excused ho took his place at the Split on Austria, 'Big Four' Turns To German Treat Moscow tatlvely learned It was author. that the counc McCarthy. Wiley; against. Weather FORECASTS and vicinity: tonight. Consider- Generally Sa'.urdny, No Important tnm- Iii-r.iturr Low tonight 30: Sulurdiiy 44. Minnesota Tartly cloudy to trmicht mid Saturday with snow flurries. Colder Sut- exeept in extreme (southeast. W; .r'liixln Mostly cloudy to- n i id K.-iturd.'iy with occasional riurrsf.. No important change 'l.OCAl, obwriviiion.s for the 24 emitting 12 m. today: 44: minimum. ;t2; noon, i'leeiiiiintioii, tract! oT unow; Him ut sun risen to- TI.MI'I.KATI'UKS KI.SKWIIKItK Max. Mill. Pet. yo 20 of foreign ministers failed to agre today on the question of Oermor assets In Austria nnd turned th whole matter back to the Austria: deputies for further discussion. The council then went on to tak up the dcrmon problem. The Russians have begun a bar gaining drive In the conference t get reparations from current Ocr man production, It wns learned but the United States and Britain thus far are standing against a proposed compromise. Minister While Soviet Foreign c i. V. M. Molotov mnde clear from the start that continuing repara- tions is the most Important Rus- sian requirement in any German economic settlement, the situation had developed into a demand and counterdcmiind situation until an all-night session of the "Big Four' :otincU's coordinating committee last night caused all the powers to begin playing some of their high- est cards. Informants said this would show that In exchanges to date on Ger- man political and economic prob- lems there arc disagreements of some kind on virtually every Im- portant Issue. Palermo Shaken by Earthquake Koine A strong cn.rthriuakc shook Palermo last night but so far no damage has been reported, the 41 -75 39 80 GO 43 Italian news agency Ansa reported .10 today from the Sicilian capital. CO 20 trace 30 52 38 31 .10 explosion Tuesday afternoon. Seventy-eight bodies have been discovered thus far and, according to mine lists, were still to be accounted for. No one had more than a faint hope that any would be found alive In the No. 5 mine or the Centralla Coal Com- pany. The latest bodies found in the mine were so badly burned and bruised that a rescue leader said Identification might be difficult. Rescue Work Retarded Falling chunks of coal, smashed State House Votes Hike in Welfare Aid Old Age Recipients, Dependent Children Would Benefit St. Paul Oldsters drawing state benefits and dependent moth- ers and children Thursday won an Increase of more than in their allowances for the blennium starting July 1 in two bills passed by the house. One measure boosts old age assis- tance from a maximum to while the second grants aid of for the first dependent child of a family, for the second and for a third. The present scale is and To Ask Reconsideration After an amendment by Repre- sentative Arne .Wanvick, Duluth, had been passed, lifting the two- year limit on- the old age benefit in- creases, Representative Fred P. Memmer, St. Paul, served notice Just before adjournment; that he will seek reconsideration. He indi- cated the move was made Jn Jin ef- fort to restore the two-year extent nullified by the change. The house earlier defeated a sen- ate-passed resolution asking Con- ?ress to permit Americans to adopt orphans from wartorn Europe over; timbers, and damaged mine equip- n-PPointmcnt. 1 and above immigration quotas. Representative P. J- E. Peterson Truman, and others Introduced a bill they said would serve to in- crease the supply ot electricians for Minnesota. The measure would provide for licensing of so- called "limited electricians" for work on certain specified jobs. Ask Ban on Hospital Strikes In the senate labor committee, a etter from Fullerton Fulton.-region- al CJ.O. director, was read in which ic charged that Leonard Johnson, I state labor conciliator, was "pro- A.F.L. and antl-C.I.O." The com- mittee is considering Johnson's re- Hy Douglas II. Cornel) Washington Representa- tive J. Parncll Thomas (R.-N. said today the House committee on un-American activities which he heads will press "a probe of Hollywood." But Representative Nixon (R.- a committee member, sug- gested to reporters: "There are more important places ;o direct our immediate the government, and second, labor unions." Eric Johnston, president of the Motion Picture Association, tcstf- icd to the committee yesterday Committee Planning Olicy Hollywood Reds Strengthen Organization that there are communists In the movie capital. "But if the communists sot out to capture he declared, 'they have suffered an overwhelm- ig defeat." Prosecute, Not Persecute Johnston said the movie industry s trying to set Its own house in irder. But he opposed the Idea )f tossing out actors and writers merely because they nre commu- ists. "If they are performing a con- piratorial act, Johnston said. "But in this country we not persecute." Johnston also opposed bills be- fore the committee to outlaw the Communist party. Like several oth- er witnesses, he proposed instead pitiless exposure of communists and prosecuting them to the limit for any Illegal acts. Thomas said. "I wns disappointed in Johnston's whols testimony." 'Naive' Testimony Asserting that the witness hnd made "one naive statement right nftcr Thomas listed as examples: "The fnct that he admitted there are some communists in Holly- wood but that the Industry has done nothing to get rid of these communists. "His statement that, he Is 'not iterested in the the parlor pinks colored zealots who fall for every 'ad that comes along.' "His statement that the Amcr- can moving picture industry hasn't 31-oduced any films to combat coni- Tiunism, while ho did admit that propaganda films which had been put out to combat Hitler and Mus- ini had been very effective." ment hindered the work of the! rescue crews. same committee reeommend- The workers are now checking a committee table and began abruptly .'inline area about three miles from (j.Ln SAn fnf.1. ,.1_..fl J 4.1AA led for passage the house-approved bill barring strikes Criminal Negligence 540-foot shaft which Is the "Somo 111 mine workers, more or! entry to the pit. A trip to less, have, since I appeared here toiUl? Prcscnt site of operations re- testify last week, been murdered of the criminal negligence of and 20-foot wide passages under the earth by slow-moving mules. Power-drawn equipment has been shunted aside for fear that elec- trical sparks might set off an ex- plosion of gas collected in the mine. Rescue squads working far forward iwear gas masks and carry oxygen J. A. Krug." Lewis said there was too mue.h blood smeared over our coal" and added: "He (Krug) has failed to enforce the laws, the safety code of the In- dustry which he negotiated with this witness. hospitals and killed in charitable a house bill Emergency Bill To Block Phone Strike Drawn Washington An emergency ill to arm President Truman with n injunction club against the ireatened telephone strike was nnounced late Thursday by Rep- esentativc Hartley CR.-N. J.) lairman of the House labor com- Ittee. The measure, a stopgap until a general union-curbing bill can be passed, would amend the Norrls- La Guardla anti-injunction act and enable the administration to gel n court order stopping any strike the President considers a threat to "public health, safety or wel- fare." No Trouble Sighted Hartley said ho will ask committee to recommend the which would have substituted a pc- earlvstnres tition to the state labor conciliator the bill to the House Monday and "antici- pates no difficulty" in getting its approval. He said he already had can- vassed a majority of the members and none opposed it. The measure could scarcely pass 30th House and Senate and reach :he President's desk by April 7, ;he strike's deadline. But it might be used to halt the strike in its for the .currently necessary strike labor dispute. The senate judiciary Hartley said his measure is de- signed to meet the threat not of a telephone strike by the tlonal Federation of committee workers but also what J. Edffar Hoover, director of the Federal Bureau of Investi- gation, calls the Communist party of the United States a "fifth column" who "goal Is the overthrow of our government" as he testifies before the House un-American activities com- mittee in Washington. CA.P. Wircphoto.) today deferred action on a Possible sympathy strike of the._ _, -_ attempt to tack and anti-closed National Association of Broadcast: I.. I nv I Ill- shop amendment onto the fair and Technicians." Ill 1 CIA shop amendment onto the fair and Technicians." ployment practices bill after adopt- Furthermore, Hartley said he is ing a series ol "toning amendments. The committee agreed "He now sends down there through (tanks on their backs the President, the name of Mr. Boyd for directorship. The basis of Boyd's testimony has been that he possesses no qualifications for the positlton. "By his own admission he knows no problems of the coal mining in- dustry." Too JVliicli Honk Learning "There is too much book rge1 Blamed icither later today or Saturday morning for final action on the bill. 'ho possibility of "some, i difficulty at Western Union." and to tnc paper industry, which hcl said may bo tied up by a "possible strike of the Poudrlnicr Wire The workers said because of thei A skiers' bonus bill payable in (Continued on Page 3, Column 4) tedious slowness of their wlth a receipts' which Includes boarding off all side passageways after inspection to aid ventilation, it might take "two or three days" to finish their task, i Fred Hcllmeyer, the company's 'chief electrician at the mine, told a TELEPHONE nnd too little practical when we read of coal miners dying every dny. Here is the disaster at ;cntralia, 111. Another may come onlght or tomorrow. "I .suppose, we might all be sorry, 'Ut that will not help the anguish t the bereaved." 4. T.W. T.W. I> T W. Flood stage KtuKc Today Change M 3.0 7.3 12 4.0 5.D y.o N. D. Bank Robber jets 1 to 10 Years Uowbclls, N. D. John J. Immons, 40, Sparks, Thursday sentenced to prison for from ne to ten years after a jury had ound him guilty of the robbery of ic First National bank here August 1931, reporter from his investigation in the mine he believed the explo- sion had been due to a "shot charge Improperly packed." Shot charges are. sot off In mines to loosen coal. The electrician said a flash of flame followed the blast, sweeping through coal dust. tax to finance its total, was oITcrcd the state legislature to- day by a subcommittee of the house committee on veterans affairs. The tax would be IVi mills on; "gross applying to indi- viduals and corporations, with cer- tain exceptions. .1 .5 .0 .5 .1 1.1 ,'j.2 ii.a Ml 9.7 -I- .1 4.8 .2 12 C.G -H .1 Tributary Slrrum.t ut Durancl.. 4.0 .5 ut Thi-ilmim.. 4.5 .1 iiliovc Alma.... Ii.2 .7 nl DodKc. 2.4 i. u: ui S.7 CIIIVK- ;i! W. Sulrrn 2.0 .it Houston....... .3 FOKKCAST (lrii.ni ll.istincs to CiuUnnberc) Th'-rc will be no material change i river .-.tiigi-.s throughout this cxccrit for minor Riot for Food in British-Ruled Dusseldorf By George Boultwood Dus.scldorf, Germany Germans in a crowd of about 100.000 stoned British-occupied buildings and attacked British military cars today In a two-hour demonstration over food short- It was the most violent manifestation of unrest in the Ruhr since the occupation began, and the biggest rnlly sinco Hitler. Two military cars were over- turned ancl one was thrown in a park lake. Another, carrying British and American correspondents, wat stoned by demonstrators. Windows In the three -British buildings were Residents Flee Fire in St. Paul St. Paul Residents 20 Killed in Riots Palestine Issue May Go to U.N. Lake Success N. y. The, United States has told Britain it would not object to any move several weeks." These hearings iing the Palestine mandate problem are_necessary before the full Sen- Bill Predicted By J.ick Bell Washington Tile Senate finance committee reserved a cold storage spot today for the House- approved tax-cutting bill until members can find out more about government costs next year. Chairman Millikin (R.-Colo.) told reporter that hearings on the measure to lop nearly o.T this year's tax bills of citizens "probably won't be .started Urges Council to Continue Active Interest in Balkans Ry John A, Parrls, Jr. Lake Success, N. Y. XVorron R. Austin explained to the United Nations today that President Tru- man's plans to help Greece and Turkey resist totalitarian pressure envisage a policy of using the pow- er of the United Slates to back up the principles of the world charter. He made it clear, however, that paste! America respects the right of all or the salmon members of the to follow what- ever way of life or system of gov- ernment they choose, so Ions as ,hc choice Is freely made without nlimldation and so long as such nations do not Interfere with the rifthls of other countries or the lib- erties of other peoples. In .1 speech prepared for delivery to the Security council this after- noon, the American representative to U.N. insisted tli.it the proposed aid program for Greece and Turkey has a specific .ind di- rect bearing upon the central ob- jectives of U, S. foreign policy. Build World Security That policy, Austin said, is "to strengthen the United Nations and to advance the building of collective security" under the world organi- sation. Thus, the proposed Greek-Turkish aid program would, in fact, he as- serted, "be a most essential act in support of this policy of the United Slates in and toward the United Nations, As the President sold: 'In helping free and independent na- tions to maintain their freedom, the United States will be giving effect to the principles of the charter of the United Nations.'" Austin declared that aid to tha two countries, together with effective action by the Security council In the case ot the northern Greek frontiers, would "materially ad- vance the cause of peace." "President Truman's message to Congress comprehended more than Greece and Turkey when he spoke ot conditions in the world affecting the security of the United States through the insecurity of the Austin explained. "He declared the situation in Greece Turkey to be one of the factors of Insecurity pointed out the various require- ments for restoration of stability. Giving Momentum "The United States is giving mo- mentum to the United Nations by its present policy and it desires and welcomes corresponding interest and support from other members of the United Nations." "Therefore." he added, "it is im- portant that the United Nations take an active interest in all that is required for the re-establishment of stability, to discourage and pre- vent threats of aggression of any kind, or threats to the independence of a fellow member, and to afford opportunity to her people to enhance their welfare and dignity." Declaring the United Suites h-ts a "special and pressing interest in effective action" by the -security council in the Greek case now be- fore the council, Austin suggested that the U. N. Balkan investigat- ing commission remain on the spot until the issue hns been settled. Changes i before a special session of the United ale cnn net. j Nations assembly, Isource .said today. an informed _ With the aid of 40 Dcmoerats 233 The go-ahead from Washington immediately interpreted as Republicans pushed the bill through the House yesterday on a 273 to 137 votc- This was one short of the to Calcutta A 7iew wave oflwas stabbings broke out here meaning the last obstacle to a u wou'a bringing the casualty toll to .session had been removed il and Indicated that dcacl and 100 Injured since the that Britain would follow n bc, )n d0r start fin Hindu-Moslem disorders with a memorandum o.o.i. no.ic i.o gci, a three days ngo. rctarlat to canvass the Tension is still running high in .nations, the affected areas of north, east, A majority of 28 members coul In six apartments of a two-story land central Calcutta and shows] decide the issue for a special ses smashed. Food Scale Not Met Traffic was paralyzed as the huge crowd milled through the public park In the center of the city "Intoning to speeches by trade union riulcrx. British' public safety offl- reinforcemcnts but had been cliil.s said police were standing by, upper pools due to Tlir civiir .-.lowly nncl Uiu Wisconsin very lltllf. kept hidden from the view of the demonstrators. Police had advised Allied vehicles to avoid the area during the demonstration. The crowd dispersed at noon. British officials say the calorle ration scale has not been met for tlu> past few weeks, and that some places received only 800 dally. Workers abandoned factories. shops and offices to parade to the Butted, park, carrying banners with suchj slogans as: "We are "Don't let our children and "We want bread." The whole demonstration had earmarks of systematic organiza- tion and British officials said it was political, but declined to name building were forced to flee early to-ihttle signs ot easing, day when fire gutted the causing loss estimated unofflciallj at near Two women were rescued from the burning building by firemen. Four other persons climbed through win- dows onto the roof of on adjoining building, from where they were token down ladders. The fire was discovered shortly after 1 n. m., by one of the resi- dents, Thelma Morrises, whose screams awakened other sin the place. Two business places on the ground floor, the Park Liquor store and the Park Drug Company, were sion on Palestine. Pair Gives Away in Oil Properties Houston, Roy and Llllie Cullen gave away 000 because, they said, they are self- ish people. "Wo are both that Kelflsh that we wish to sec our money spent during Other Demonstrations lifetime, so that we may derive Virtually all but essential actlvl- great pleasure from Cullen said. the party they believed responsible. German sources said communists were responsible for the demonstra- tion, but said trade unionists did Ihe detailed organizing work. les ceased In this Rhineland capi- tal, which has a population of persons. Prominent among :hc demonstrators were uniformed transport employes who marched n .solid ranks hundreds strong. Other demonstrations involving ipproxlmalely were scheduled In various Ruhr towns. Cullen announced the be used to establish a foundation forj the purpose of aiding educational, medical and charitable Institutions: night. The money is in the form of oil properties containing some to barrels of oil, estimated to be worth a barrel. This New Device for parking cars in tiers was demonstrated by Sanders Brothers of Spokane, Wash. A car was picked up oil the fork of the mobile lift and placed on the top deck In loss than two jninu'-cs. In use In a garage, the car racks would be placed against one iinoUier would not require the angled supports used on the model. CA.P. Wirephoto.) ted over ada- mant White House opposition. Changes Planned Millikin left little doubt when I He said the security council might recommend that Greece, Yugoslavia. Bulgaria and Albania agree on a system of border con- (Continucd on P.IRC 4. Column 5) AUSTIN Porter Urges Aid to Greece Paul "Porter, special American envoy to Greece. that asserted today that proposed United "ins committee docs get'around ald Greece should be to it some changes arc likely in strong enough to "demonstrate to the measure which provides 30 per the that the objectives and cent clashes in taxes for 25.000.000 Policies of democracy arc superior in the lower income brackets and 20 per cent oil for most in the higher echelons. Millikin noted that conferees haven't been able to reach a com- promise on the House move to please a cut in Presi- dent Truman's budget and the Sen- ate's decision not only to hold this reduction to but to apply in surplus rev- enues to debt payments. The House-approved tax bin. meanwhile, laced Democratic and to those of any other system." His arguments, as he reviewed the Greeks' needs in testimony to the House foreign affairs committee, ob- viously were calculated to offset the contention in some Capitol hill quar- ters that American assistance to the southern European country should be limited to strict relief. Moves also have developed in Con- gress to bar any aid for Turkey rather than giving Mr. Trunian a free hands, as asked, to send and limited military inis- iomc Republican opposition from sions to help Greece nnd Turkey vithin and without the finance resist Communist aggression. Just back from Athens after (D.-Va.) charged two-month survey of the Greek situation. Porter declared flatly that "It is obvious to all that Greece cannot work out her own destiny alone." within committee. Senator Byrd that the proposed tax reduction would cause a revenue loss to the government of nearly n the fiscal year beginning July 1 He said the House thus far ha; only an actual cut In ex- penses of Three Republicans Oppose BUI Only three Republicans. Rcprc- entaUvcs Anderson of Minnesota, Buffet of Nebraska and E.'igcl of ilichigan, joined the Democrats in ipposing passage. The roll-call vote passing the in- omc tax bill included: Andrcscn, Dcvitt, Judd, Knutson, O'Hara, Against: Aiicicrsnr, Intnik. Brophy, Byrnes, veofc, Kersten, Murray. Smith, tevcnson. Paired against: HulL Iran Will Claim War Reparations Moscow Iran served notice today that .she would claim repara- tions nt the peace conference from Germany for war damages listed at Iran's ambassador. Prince Mozaf- fcr Pirouz, said at the same time that he had received personal as- surances from all -Jie four-power foreign ministers thnt they would support Iran's request that she be Olowed to participate in the peace conference.   

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