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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 26, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER mid fold tonlfht. wmrmrr Full Lcaied Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations s OKOLSKY Read Ills New Column Dally on Editorial Pace VOLUME 47. NO. 32 WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING. MARCH 26, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Hope Wanes for 122 in Illinois Mine 'Only Says Knutson Of Tax Cut Early Passage of Bill Predicted As House Debate Opens I-'runels Til. I.emuy Washington Representative Ut.-Mlmi.) opened House clrbi.'.e un the tux- bill today with declara- tions thai It would (A) Ease the burden of llitJc taxpayers, (B) En- couriiKe new risk ventures by bust-' ness und   "Put the uxe to punl- tivr taxes." The short, bald Mlnncsotan tol "For year.-, we Republicans hav beer, warning that the short-halre wi unen and loiiK-halred men o a'.len minds In the administrate branch of the Kovernment were try Ini; to wreck the American way o life und install a hybrid oligarchy :n Washington through conflscatory taxation. "Thl-i bill i.i fair, but It is onl> n Mart In the rlKht direction. At clear uwuy the deud wood in the rxecuilVB brunch and rcstor efficiency In government there wll be further tax relief." No Amrnflmrntfi The Republican-backed OOO.OOO tnx-cutllnc bill won Itn firs test today when the House voted to consider this measure on a take-1 or ieave-Jt bails. A voice vote clamped on the no amendment rule. Thi.i action came shortly after President. Truman In effect voiced opposition to the measure by citing 10 newsmen his message to Con- gress in January. At a Treasury news conference, Secretary Snydcr also was asked whether he would advise Mr. Tru- U. S. From Germany MOMOW The United StatCM received lens than In reparations from Germany, according to a state- ment circulated among: the other foreign ministers by U. S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall. The statement, evidently In- tended to meet Soviet Foreign Minister Molotor'n charges that the United been tak- ing In from Germany, nhows that most of what the IT. S. (fcttlnjc comes from external assets of Ger- many. man to veto the bill, plied: Snydcr re- "I am very positively opposed In these prosperous times to having the government do deficit flnanc- Sr.yder added that "de.nclt financ- ing is always Inflationary" find that if government spending exceeds itn income it will have the effect of further lifting prices. He srtld prices are already "out of line." Asked at his news conference for comment on the Republican drive to reduce taxes, Mr. Truman aald his position was stated In his Jan- He then said "I cannot recom- mend tax reduction" and added the opinion that nt present "high taxes contribute to the welfare and se- curity of the country." The President turned aside more specific question about the! Knuuson tax measure being con iide.-ed by the House. Vote Tomorrow The House showdown vote on thi tax bill Is set for tomorrow. Speakc: Martin who personally Republican support, con- fid'-ntly predicted victory by n. com- fortable margin. out- iiumb'T In the House 245 tn 1K8. But even before the House voted Senator Ta.'t (R.-Ohlo) Indicated ;he measure will bo revised when renches the Senate. One change there might make 'Rig Four' To Take Up China Problem Russia Agrees to Exchange of Views in Writing By John M. IHehtower Moscow Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov agreed to- day to TJ. S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall's proposal lor a written exchange of information on China, but said his government still believed Informal Big Three dis- cussions offered a better means or dealing with the Chinese problem. 'I have no objection to offer to your Molotov told. Mar- shall, but he added: "Such a way of communicating Information docs, not seem to me to be entirely satisfactory." The Russian foreign minister made known his views In a letter to Marshall. He also presumably com- The absence of a Soviet delegate his views to British For- Russia Fails to Attend Meeting of U.N. Committee By Max Flarrclson Lake Success, N. Y. Soviet Russia ignored the opening session today of the United Nations trustee- ship council whose designated mis- sion Is to look after the Interests of the world's nonself governing peoples. did not prevent the council from proceccllnK with Immediate busi- ness. It caused concern, however, among U. N. officials already worried by what appeared to be growing trend to by-pass the organization on Important problems. There was no explanation from the Soviet U. N. delegation headed by Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko. He refused to make any statement on Russian plans. Some delegates expressed the belief that the naming of a Soviet dele- gate had merely been delayed and might come through later. During the general assembly de- bate on trustcshlp last fall, Russia to approve any of the eight draft trusteeship agreements cover- ng former League of Nations man- late territories now placed under .he trusteeship system. The Soviet lelcgatlon then took the view that these were Invalid be- ausc of several of their provisions, Secretary-General Trygve Lie penedtho trusteeship session with n appeal to members of the TJ. N. o resort to the world peace organ- zatlon on all international prob- 'even when the most vital Interests are at stake.' This was Lie's first public address .nee President Truman declared he U. N. was unable to deal with otalltarian threats to Greece and Turkey and asked Congress for aid to those countries. elgn Sccretnry Ernest Bcvin, who called on Marshall at the U. S. em- bassy, where they conferred briefly. Asked by Molotov The proposal that the Chinese situation be taken up during the present conference In Moscow was broached by Molotov at the. very outset of the foreign ministers meetings. Marshall's position was that he could not consent to a discussion of Chinese problems unless repre- sentatives of China were invited to sit In on the position with which Molotox did not agree. Mar- shall then proposed that the min- isters exchange written informa- tion by April 1, making copies avail- able to the Chinese government The deputy foreign ministers working on Austrian peace problems made little progress this morning In discussions on economic clauses. Several clauses were discussed but no agreement was reached. Concession Considered Both the United States and the Soviet Union were reported authorl- the effective date July 1, rather than last January 1 as provided In the Hour.e bill. This would reduce the tax cut this calendar year to approximately Taft told reporters the House in its present form, would cost the treasury In the fiscal year beginning July 1 because In overpayments for the January-to-July period would hnve to be added to the 000 full-5'ear reduction. Republicans claimed that business prosperity demands lower Income t.-txes. while Democrats countered cries a. "windfall to wealthy taxpayers." In its prwnt form the bill would] by 30 per cent the taxes ot! I'O.OOO.OOO persons In the smallc; income bracket and 11 20 crnt cut to of the other nmnr.c the Individual tax pavers. The mco-surc was presented to th IIou.se under a rule requiring tha body to vote for the full COO cut or no cut at all. Outnumbering '.he Democrats b D-iC> to 188, Republicans confidential pr'-dSctrd House passage by night .'ili tomorrow. Wisecarver Weds 17-Year-Old Girl Las Vegas, N'rv. Ellsworth Wmecarver. 17, who had twice eloped married women, and his pretty bride, the .Mime age, are honcymoon- inK today and facing such utern as finding a place to live and a Job to live on. Speaking of his Job potentialities Wisecarvcr said: "I can do lots of things. I've hac a lot of experience, I've tried just about everything." Before Jumping over to St. George, Uuih, for a quick wedding ceremony with Betty 2oe Rcber, plump, pret- ty and also 17, Sonny had been a bus boy hi a hotel here. "But I've ROI responsibilities now." he said. The youth came to Nevada after i.-scuplriK from a California youth imthorlty camp, where ho was com- after running nwny with Mrs. Deveny, 25, mother of two. his marriage to Mrs. Elaine Mor.fredl, 21, nl.vo mother of two, had been annulled. Raises Asked for Badger Workers By Arthur Byitrotn Madison, Substantial Increases In the salaries of state employes and standardization of the work week to 3814 and 48 hours was recommended to the Joint finance committee of the legislature yester- day by A. J. Opstedal, director of the bureau of personnel. Opstcdal's recommendations were made at the request of the board of personnel and In conformity with a law which requires the board each blcnnlum to suggest changes in sal- aries and working conditions for state employes. If the finance com- mute approves, these changes will remain in effect for the 1847-49 blcnnlum. Following are the major recom- mendations: That a bonus granted April 1, 1940 and a bonus granted September 16, 1946, be f roxen Into present salary sched- ules. That a permanent bonus ranging from to for employes making up to a month granted by the 1945 legislature be made to apply to all employes, regardless of the Blzc of their salaries, That, the number of salary ranges be reduced from 32 to 21 with the top salary range In- creased from to to to That of the total salary clas- sifications, 307 be upgraded from to a month, 282 remain the same and 38 bo dropped. Under the proposal submitted by the personnel board, the 21 new salary ranges would run from the lowest of to up to the highest of to S7GO. "Slncc the cost of living has actually risen 12.1 points since the tatlvely to be considering important concessions In their demands on Germany so .accomplish their" major alms "peace settlement In the council of foreign ministers. Officials were doubtful, however, that any deals were in prospect of sufficient import to produce major Her Face Set With anxiety, a miner's wife, center, is comforted In the washhouse of the Centralia Cool Company mine by others who also have menfolk trapped In the mine below. One Of Nine Men brought out of Centralia Company mine number 5 which was wrecked by an explosion yesterday afternoon. 

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