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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 24, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 24, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                EATHER nnd colder lonlfhti and cold s Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY Read His New Column Dally on Editorial Fage VOLUME 47. NO. 30 WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING. MARCH -24, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Acheson Denies Greece to Get Troops Quick O.K. of Purge of Disloyal Employes Seen DR. WILLIAM KUIIZ, "2, one-time president of the League of Na- tions and a. former German min- ister of the Interior, U considered leading candidate for the Relcb chancellorship when Germany achieves jielf-frovernmont again. He Is leader ot the Liberal Demo- cratic party In th.e Soviet occupa- tion zone. tion. Representative Keefe (R.-Wis.) More For Building in Minnesota Asked St. Theodore Drliicoll, state commissioner of administra- tion, today unfolded the state's building program before the house appropriations committee and rec- ommended on additional to supplement funds already avail- able for six building projects. Drlscoll. citing the rising build- ing cost since the last three legis- latures set aside funds for certain construction work, asked for an Additional to augment funds available for new teachers college buildings ut St. Cloud, Duluth, and Bemldjl and for a lands and min- erals building at Hlbblrtg, and new Arioka armory. He also said more Is re- quired for the University of Minne- sota to erect a new aeronautical building for which the legislature previously had approved Taking into consideration low bids already on file, Drlscoll said, an additional is needed at St. Cloud Teachers college for a new main building and auditorium to supplement now available. At Duluth, is available but the low bid of requires 966 more. At BemidJI, an additional Is needed since Is car- marked. At Hlbblng Is the low bid, w- requiring an additional Three" occupants, the army air Names of Workers to Be Checked in F.B.I. Records Congress took today to President Truman's order for a purge of disloyal federal em- ployes like a cluck to water. While there was widespread com- ment on Capitol hill that the order should have been issued long ago, congressional leaders lost no time In laying the foundation for what- ever new legal backing may be necessary. Representative Rces chairman of the House civil service committee, said he would call the group into session quickly to de- ermine whether legislation is needed to put teeth into the order. In directing the dismissal of all federal employes whenever "rea- sonable ground" exists to doubt their loyalty, Mr. Truman ordered the names of all workers to be checked against FJB.I. records. Master Index Asked He also ordered a "master Index" of all persons whose loyalty has been Investigated since September 1. 1930, and called for the com- pilation of a single list of all sub- versive organizations. And he specified that any employe affiliated with or in "sympathetic association" with any totalitarian fascist, communist or subvcrsivi group Is to be banned irom thi federal payroll. Members of the House approprla tlons committee.and the eommlttci on un-American o. German Ore Still Going To Russia Retaliation Embargo Report 'Faux Zone Official Says Berlin An American offi- cial in the economically merged (United States-British zones of Ger- many says that as yet zonal au- thorities "have mude no reduction nor embargo of shipments" or iron and steel to the Russian zone but that they will "have to set a date for action" if interzonal trade is not brought into balance, M. S. SzymcKak, director of the economics division of the American military government, making this statement yesterday, described as a "faux pas" a British-American announcement Friday that such shipments to the Soviet zone had been reduced and that a full em- bargo was being considered. Subsequent to the latter an- nouncement, a release cleared the public relations office of the bizonal economics administration at Minden became known through of- ficials there. This release said that these shipments "were today (Fri- day) suspended for nn indefinite period." The release was based on a communique, already drafted but then still under discussion in Ber- lin. which have been spearheading the congressional drive against govern- ment workers with questionable In the prcsidentla action a vindication of their posi- viewed the order as strengthening tho stand of the House appropria- ;lons :or the office of director of the Conciliation service, headed by Ed- gar L, Warren. Kcefe, chairman of ;he subcommittee which recom- mended the Questioned War- ren's loyalty during committed hear- ngs. Warren denied any disloyal ir "radical" beliefs. Action Welcomed House Speaker Martin ;ald it was "good to see that he the has finally awaken- id to the truth of what we have icon telling him for the last few 'ears." Chairman Wiley of the Senate Judiciary committee, termed he order long overdue. A White House official said the order will not result in a 'witch hunt" and added: "I can't imagine that any great number of firings will result." Mr, Truman's action was based on a report from a six-member "tem- porary commission on employe loy- alty" headed by A. Dcvltt Vanech, assistant attorney general. Three Killed in Army Plane Crash Sumtcr. S. A C-45 army transport crashed 15 miles north of Camden before dawn and killed The joint statement mentioning suspension of shipments said the action was being taken because the Russian zone had become more and more delinquent in deliveries to the British-XL S.. zone promised in an interzonal trade pact. The statement said thut the British- American zones had shipped ,94 per cent of pact commitments to the Soviet zone, Szymczalc said that three or four weeks aero the director of economics of tho Soviet military administra- tion had been given a formal re- quest for fresh Russian efforts to, bring interzonal trade into balance, i He reported that the director had not yet replied. Warning that some action might be taken eventually, Sxymczak add- ed: "Thut doesn't mean we will send stoei deliveries elsewhere, but rather that we will hold them aside until the Russians catch up with deliveries of their products to our zone. Now that spring weather re- Smoke And Flames Billow From the Barber Laboratories, Inc., building in New Orleans, La.. firemen could bring the fire under control the flames had spread to an, adjoining church and icehouse. Damage to the three buildings was estimated to be (A.P. Wirephoto.) A His Plant Strikers Vote Retarri to Work Milwaukee The longest major strike in1 the nation, U.A.W.-C.I.O. Local 248's toitter and spasmodically bloody struggle at the home plant of the Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company, ended without a settlement today as lines of production workers filed quietly Into the vast works. West Allis Police Captain Harvey G. DIecklioff said there were ieves transport may catch up." The German central ministry for trade In the Soviet zone ex- ception to Brltlsh-U. S. charges of overwhelmingly one-sided Soviet delinquencies in a statement put out through the Russia-controlled German news agency. This statement said winter trans- port troubles had slowed down de- iverics in all zones and that "de- inquencies of the Soviet zone are by no means larger than those of he western zones." At Anoka more was asked to meet the low bid of Dnscoll explained that Governor Youncdahl In his budget rccom- mrndcd additional for the projects, exclusive of the aeronauti- cal building, r.o actually only more !s required than wa.i bc- rnrly in January. Drlscoll presented a building pro- gram costing But, he ex- Dlalnrd, legislatures have upprovi-d S'l.000.000 for a veteran M-rvicr bulldinc; for th Mayo memorial at the university for state institutions, nn for the aeronautical build The low and the awards wi: be announced until the leglsla takes action, Drlscoll said. Th commissioner wax to present th prosrram to the senate finance com rr.l'.'.ef later today. base at Shaw Field announced to- dny. Shaw Field withheld the names of those killed pending notification of next of kin. The plane was on a night. train- Ing flight from Pope Field at Fort Bragg, N. C. U.N. Probe Group Leaves Greece Salonika. Member: o: u C'niU-fl Nations Balkami In- ve.'.ugatlns left for Sofli und BclKrntlt today after on Inquiry or nearly two months Into intcrna fiKhting in Greece. The group wll then proceed to Geneva in a few days to a final report. Chiang Asks Party for Confidence Chiang Kai-shek, addressing a Joint meeting of gov- ernment officials and delegates to ihe Kuomintang (government party) convention, today demanded confi- dence in his leadership and said the political future of the Kuomintang depended upon unity with In the puny. Chianf: spoke after the Kuomin- tanffs central committee, concluding a ten-day secret debate on China's foreign policy, urged that Russia be a.sked to hand over the Manchurian txxt of Dairen and open negotiations over industrial machinery removed Iros Manchuria. I Bodies of Cairo Crash Victims to Be Sent to U. S. Cairo. Egypt W) The bodies of six Americans killed Thursday in the crash of a C-47 plane in the Rennebohm Urges Blackmail Probe Against Lobbyist Madison, Gov- ernor Oscar Rennebohm directed Attorney -General John E. Martin conditions, they today to use all "resources at his command to investigate a complaint of "blackmail" reported to have been registered by two Milwaukee businessmen against a lobbyist in the state legislature. Milwaukee and Madison news- papers reported yesterday that As- jsemblyman Thomson Center) had revealed that the Mil- waukee 'businessmen had reported to him the alleged activity of the lobbyist. The lobbyist had called the Mll- waukeeans and warned them that legislation was going to be intro- duced which would be detrimental to their businesses, according to published reports, and urged that the lobbyist be hired to work against the proposed legislation. In his communication to the at- torney general, Rennebohm de- clared that it was indicated that an attempt hud been made by a lobby- ist to blackmail citizens of this state. "I would like your department to use all resources at your command to explore the Rennebohm no clashes between union men and employes who remained at work or returned to their Jobs during.the 328-day-old strike. Members of Local 248 who filed into the 155-acrc plant today began receiving an cunt per hour wage increase which nonstrlkera had been getting since last August. By com- pany estimate the strike cost in lost production and wagas. The strikers returned without a contract. Only by union count, voted in yesterday's ballot- ing and union spokesmen- said (Continued on Page 2, Column 3) ALLIS CHALMERS Wide Split In German Plans Seen -Big Four' Recesses to Check Progress Plan Next Moves By John IJightowcr Moscow The diplomatic struggle over Germany in the "Big Four" foreign ministers' council entered a new phase today as the conferring powers planned their ext moves in negotiations on a German government, The Soviet union on the one hand and the United States and Britain on the other charted maneuvers aimed at achieving the kind of government under peace- treaty provisions that each side seemed to believe would be most favorable to its own political sys- tem. Proposals of all four powers on this Issue had been laid before the council in varying detail Saturday night when It quit work till to- morrow to give the foreign minis- ters' deputies time to summarize the results of deliberations now two weeks old. Some top U. S. authorities said this week shquld tell whether any concrete accomplishment could, be expected, from the Moscow con- ference. The deputies on the Austrian treaty, which had been expected to give less trouble than the Ger- man, were shown in a summariza- tion by U. S. General Mark W. Clark, to have made little progress. This summary listed eight agree- ments and seven disagreements on political clauses, seven agreements and 11 disagreements on military clauses and one agreement and nine disagreements on economic USINO a magnifying glass, Boy Scout Louis Simmons looks at somo pussy willow buds in Palisades In- terstate Park near Coysvillc, N. J. He is a member of Troop 472 which paid a visit to the park to check oil Spring's arrival. Youngdahl Flayed For Tax Stand Elbow Lake, H. Barker Deniocratlc-Parmer-lia- bor candidate for governor who was defeated by Governor Luther W. YoungcUthl, charged in a statement Sunday that the governor was large- ly responsible for failure of the leg- islature to act on problems of school stated, "and if there has been vio- ald, housing, taxation and socialilation of the law, to take proper security legislation. (action." Barker, publisher of the Grant Martin said he would call Thom- son to his office when the legisla- ture reconvened Tuesday and ques- tion him as to the facts. If Thom- son will reveal the names of the businessmen approached, Martin said, he wjll get in touch with them immediately and carry on any oth- er Investigation necessary. Stevens Point Man Killed by Auto Port Washington, ert L. Lamchow. 24, of Stevens Point, was killed instantly last night when struck by an automo- 3ile while changing a tire on his truck on highway 141. Weather mountains of Ethiopia have been brought to Cairo by plane, Bodies of the victims will sent to the United States. be Birth of 125-Pound Son Fatal to Hippopotamus Vienna, Austria Tho birth of a 125-pound son proved fatal today to Rosl, 26-year-old hippopotamus who was a fav- orite at the Vienna zoo. The baby. Rosl's 14th. was named Hassi. Attendants fed it milk from a bottle. County Herald, said the governor could help cut real estate and per- sonal property taxes if he would of- fer tho "simple solution of chopping off some of the needless activities of the state." "On the question of the statement added, "the governor has shown a complete lack of leadership. His major suggestion for making ends meet Is to take from the school fund and place it In the general revenue fund. "Ho voiced early opposition to sales taxes yet seems -to welcome such a levy on cigarettes. "I sec red when I look back over the past four years of additional tax burdens placed on the people of Minnesota through Iron ore tax de- creases. The governor remains as calm as a grazing cow in viewing the Truman to Confer With 'Big Six' FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and and colder 28. Gener- ally fair high 45. and colder to- night. Tuesday generally fair and rather cold. and colder this afternoon with snow flurries east. Clearing and considerably colder tonight. Tuesday fair but rather cold. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 61; minimum, 33; noon, 37; precipitation, .94 of an inclv, sun sets lor.lghl svt sun rises tomorrow at For the 24 hours ending at 12 m. Sunday: Maximum, 59; minimum, 32; noon, 59; TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. clauses. Of the 27 disagreements, 26 were in major points. What Next? The ministers themselves, taking their second successive- day off, Democrats May Block Tax Cut Action in Senate By Jack Bell Demo- crats may try to block any cut In income taxes until Congress can add up the cost, of government oper- ation for the year beginning July 1. Senator George top Dem- ocrat of the Senate finance com- mittee, told a reporter that if the House stamps its expected okay this week on a measure providing for tax reductions ranging from 20 to 30 per cent .the bill will face delay- were busy analyzing what had been ,ng actlon ]n tne senate. dene so far and planning what to do next. Diplomatic officials professed to see a major clash developing over essential differences between the plan for the German government outlined by Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov and those outlined by Marshall and British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin. In a nutshell, the proposals sub- "I don't sec how can act in- telligently in culling taxes until we know whether there is going to be any surplus of government income over the Georgian said. "All that is in sight now Is a flcli- tious surplus and it's poor business to be giving It away until it be- comes actual." George thus took sharp Issue with mitted last week show, said these j House Speaker Martin (R.-Mass.) officials, that the -Soviet union wants to build the government from the top down, whilo the U. S. and Britain want to construct It from" the up. Americans and Britons privately expressed the belief that Russia (Continued on Page 2, Column WIDE SPLIT who announced plans for going "right ahead" with the tax-cullinp: bill. A vote is set tentatively for Wednesday. "There Is no reason, for Martin, told newsmen. "We know we are going to have enough margin Wants Only Money From U.S., He Says Documents on Red Expansion Plans in Near East Bared Alex Sinclcton Washington Under Secre- tary of State Dean Acheson declared firmly and flatly that American plans for bulwarking Greece and Turkey against; communism "do not Include our sending troops." "We have not been asked to do so. We do not :f foresee any need to do so. And we i do not intend to do Acheson asserted. I His testimony I was prepared for I the opening of I hearings by the I Senate foreign re- I lations committee on President Tru- man's program for shoring v.p independence of the two southern European countries with American, dollars, weapons and limited mili- tary missions. As he did before the House for- eign affairs committee last week, the acting cabinet officer said he docs not think the aid proposals will lead, to war. "I think that quite the opposite Is Acheson told the senators. "These proposals are designed to Increase the stability of. and to further the opportunity for demo- Funds to Korea Washington Under Secretary of State Acheson said today that the United Stales must invest funds to put South- ern Korea on a sound economic basis because Russia has blork- cd. any agreement for a unified government of that country. Acheson mentioned prospect when testifying before the Senate foreign relations committee in support of Presi- dent Truman's plan to bulwark Greece and Turkey against communism. He did not say how mcch the Korean project may cost, but said the War, State and Navy departments are consider- ing it. Man Shot in Chicago British Consulate Chicag-o A man visiting the office of the British consulate and information services was shot who escaped. The victim was Jnck Johnston. 68, of Chicago. A woman clerk In the office told police she saw a (coastal city northwest of here sai cratic development in, two countries most Important to the world com- munity. "These are not-acts which lead to tirement, too." Tel Aviv Bank Robbed of Aviv police reported that a gang robbed the Palestine Discount bank of pounds (about nt the peak of business this morning. "They lead in the other direction. "They help to maintain the in- tegrity and the United Nations charter calls the 'sovereign states. That Is one of the principles upon which the whole effort to organize the world for peace is founded." Documentary Evidence Acheson's testimony before the Senate committee one side of a two-way congressional drive to press the aid program through. It WHS spurred by documentary nccu- struggle, then heard a shot. The second man fled, she said. She said she could not identify the fleeing man, and was unable to describe him. Consulate officials were unavail- able for comment. The report from the all-Jewish jsations that Russia is attempting to ,astal city northwest of here lhc communistic con- a group of men first walked into the bank as a screen for the gunmen. Ten armed men followed a feu- minutes later, the police reported, and. forcing a dozen employes and 50 customers to hold up their hands, scooped up cash from the tills. trol over both Greece and Turkey. These "secret- label removed under congressional pressure to give the nation the "full Russia of w.-iging a. "wnr of nerves" ngrvhist Turkey, told of n. "master plan" lo jnakr Greece (Continued on 7, Column 4) ACHIiSON TESTIFIES Chicago 53 Denver Los Angeles Miami Tru- Mpls.-St. Paul same scene. When he rcal.y sees red Whi7e House not d sclo e the lo frtmn nlfir v% is when some village, city or county official has not functioned as he thinks they should. "In dealing with the little fellow, the governor Is as bold as a lion, But in dealing with the big fellow, the governor is meek as a mouse." Milwaukee Boy Drowns in Attempt to Rescue Friend reasons for the conference. The "Big Six" is made up of four New York man will meet with the Orleans congressional "Big Six" in an un- precedented night meeting nt the White House tonight. The meeting, to be held in the residential part of the executive mansion. Is set for 7 p. m. The 68 66 72 56 75 54 Phoenix 74 RIVER BULLETIN 48 20 51 70 32 C7 48 50 .97 .05 .20 British to Move for Test Copper Shortage Of Sincerity' on Arms Cut Seen in 18 Months myko was said he could not agree By Larry Hauck Lake Success. N. Y. Great Britain prepared today to move for a "test of sincerity" in the United Nations commission on convention armaments before the new 11-nation body starts work on detailed plans to strip down the world's arms. Sir Alexander asked to to unlimited control and inspec- tions and mentioned infringement on sovereignty. The United States repeated that nothing less than full inspection rights would suffice Salt Lake E. T. Swn- nard, president of the Kennecott Copper Corporation, is predicting a copper shortage within the next 12 to 18 months. "The country's permanent stock- While making it clear that the pile almost is he said in nltcd States was ready to tola" Interview. "It has dwindled ou on the issue, American dele-! away to a fraction or i us peak or speak as the commission convened gate Herschel V. Johnson drafted ,500 000 tons at the end of the v, or for its opening meeting, and was his policy statement along these: Unp.odicU.-d demand for Republicans and two as Red Wing Lake City Rends Durn 4, T.W. Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change 14 12 Senator Vandenberg, president pro teinpore of the Sen- ate; Senate Majority Leader White House Speaker Martin House Majority Leader Halluck Senate Minority Democrats, Dam 5, T.W, Dam 5A, T.W. Winona (C.P.) 13 Dam 6, Pool Dam 6. T.W. Dakota (C.P.) Dam 7, Pool Dam 7, T.W. Crosse 12 3.4 6.8 3.8 5.0 2.8 4.1 5.8 O.G 5.0 7.8 9.6 2.7 5.0 .3 -I- .5 H- .4 !ready to plump for a strict under- standing of the relationship be- tween security and disarmament. A source close to Cadogan said the British delegates hoped to force "an early test of sincerity" before agreeing to. launch into weeks and months of discussions on arms re- duction. While Cadogan was not prepared to 'question the moves of any one country, it was recalled that the whole broad arms slashing proposal -1- -1 was tossed into the general assem- Mllwaukee Fourteen- year-old Eugene Kyan drowned yesterday when he attempted to rescue a boy friend, Richard rerjrandc, 16, who had broken through tho Ice on the Milwau- kee river. Younit Fernando clunfr to the Ice anil was rescued later by Fire Chief Francis Slevers of the town of Lake. Fcrpandc, Ryan and two oth- er companions were playing near the river when Pergande ventured out onto the ice. The ice Rave way, plunging him Into the water but he crabbed a .sec- tion and hung on. Ilyan begun out on tho Ice toward Pcrganilc while the other two boys ran for help. The ice broke beneath Ryan also and he disappeared under the water. Shortly afterwards, Sievcrs and another fireman, Joe Joq- wer, arrived. Slcvcrs flattened himself on the ice and Joqwcr hung onto his heels. It was a matter of some minutes before the boy could be pulled onto the ice. Meanwhile, a fire truck arrived and the gap in the ice TVOS bridged with a ladder. Dynamite was used to blast the ice in a search for Ryan's body but late yesterday it still hail 11 ot been, found. Leader Barkley and' House'La Minority Leader Bayburn Tributary Streams Chippcwa at Durarid 2.8 Zumbro at Theilman 10.2 Buffalo above Alma 5.2 Trempealeau at Dodge 4.6 Black at Nelllsville ll.O New Northf ield Election Asked Faribault, Minn. Notice of contest was on file with the Rice county clerk of court today in con- nection with a recent Northfleldj city election. In which a measure calling for a miunlcipal liquor store was defeated by. 69 votes. The notice was filed by Robert Koch, Northfield attorney. The notice asks the court to purge the voting'list or.order a new election, contending that more thanMOO St. Olaf college students, not residing within the city limits, participated in tho balloting. .1 .1 -I- .3 G.4 -i-2.2 bly in a surprise step lost fall by Soviet Foreign Minister V. M, Mo- lotov. This source did comment that Black at Galesville Root at Houston 10.9 Cadogan expected his sptech to get a cool reception from Andrei A. Gromyko, Soviet delegate. The British were represented as _ ,1 -1-4.2 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to The Kickapoo, Koot and Zumbro will reach near bankful stage this afternoon. The upper and middle Black will rise rapidly with ice mov- ing out above Galesville. The middle Wisconsin will show a moderate rise being opposed to starting technical discussions until the basic principles had been laid down, preferably in openings meeting of the commis- sion. In keeping with his stand, Cado- gan was ready to go along with the United States' position that any arms cutting program must be ac- companied by air tight provisions the next -18 hours. Prom Hastings for safeguards and inspections, to .dam ten, all gates will be opened! This provision was expected to lines: 1. The world cannot expect a general arms reduction system to function until safeguards and inspection provisions arc ready. 2. Arms sliishins- must Rn hand in hand with Rcncral security. The world will be in bet- ter condition to scrap (runs once the peace treaties are signed. 4. Arms reduction is only one step toward peace, and by itself might boomerang into war. The commission, due to make its first report to the parent security council by May 13, will be limited to discussions of weapons outside the range of the atomic energy commission. That tcn-month-old body will deal with tho atomic bomb and other weapons of moss destruction. Drawing of a fine line between mass destruction weapons and ordinary weapons promised to pro- vide some Interesting debate. The commission also must decide when and how it will collect figures on every nation's troops and arma- ments, facts generally considered necessary to any reduction plans. Members of the commission arc the United States, Great Britain, resulting In rises averaging one foot the next 48 hours with correspond- run into the same Russian objec- tions which have slowed down dls- falls In all tho lower pools. [cussions on atomic control. Gro- coppcr from European countries, with unprecedented demand from domestic users, accounts for the rapidly approaching shortage. While industry, which hn.s boon fed by tho stockpile, hasn't yet foil the pinch. It will when the rc.srrvc peters out. which probably will bo thn l.-Ulcr piirt of April." Stunnard arrived here last night with uvo other Kcnnecott odcla.ls and with them will spend the next ifour days inspecting his firm's Utah holdings. Even with Senate passage of House-approved suspension of t-ir- iir.s on copper, Stannard said, tho nntlon still faces a shortage of the metal. He said he expected the bulk of imported copper would come from. Mexico and South America. Fire Sweeps British Liner in Drydock Hcbburn-on-Tynr, Fire of undertermined origin swept the three upper decks of the 22.424- ton British liner Monarch of Ber- muda as she lay in drydock here today. The blaze, fanned by a strong: wind, was discovered shortly after 3 a. m. and rngcd for more than China, Belgium! eight hours before it was brought Syria, Poland, Colombia, control. There was no immc- and .Brazil. dlate estimate of the loss.   

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