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Winona Republican Herald: Friday, March 21, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 21, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER ttrnpr future mow ton If hi or s Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY lll.i New Column D.illy on Editorial Pace VOLUME 47, NO. 28 WINONA. MINNESOTA. FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 21. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Plan for Federalized Germany Offered Communism Anywhere Held Peril Release of Secret Papers on Turkey Seen by Acheson Washington Under Secre- tary of State Acheson said today existence of "Communlst-dom- for a certified list. Ih- l.'iatcc! Kovernmrnts" and place in thi- world l.i "dangerous to the so- rority of the United States." Acheson made that reply when R'-prer.entatlve Jurld n.'.kcd whether a Communist-dom- inated Kovernment of China would! bra danger to United States recur- ,roundup.. by hcllcoptcr tt> control farm crop damage in this area For the .second straight day.iwa3 described yesterday as success- Certified List Shows 69 Tavern Violators A revised list showing an Increased number of "Winona county taverns holding both state-beer licenses and federal liquor stamps was received today by Sheriff George Fort. According to a state law it is illegal for a tavern licensed onlj to sell 3.2 beer to have in possession a federal liquor stamp. A drive to clean up violations In the state was started recently as a. part of Governor Youngdahl's law enforcement cam- paign, and peace officers throughout the state were sent lists of places holding both beer licenses and liquor stamps. As errors were discovered in the list sent Winona county authorities, a request was made by Sheriff Fort to the state liquor control commission Helicopter Used to Herd Deer Ilatavla, N. Y. A doer Arheson te.-.tided before the House affairs committee on ful by a state conservation depart- ment official. Charles P. dent Truman's request for author- ity to UKC plus military ft, department, said the experiment, Albans, game for the F.B.I. Aid Urged Reprc- r.eniatlve Mundt (R.-S. D.) salt! Thursday he planned to .suKKi-st an amendment to any Greece-Turkey aid measure calling upon the F.B.I. to screen personnel administering f.urh funds to Insure that "American Communists do not plant some of their people on Tni.v.lons to the two countries to try to sabotage the effort." advice and materials to help Greece n.ld Turkey resist Communist ftg- Representative Morrow (R.-N.H.) Interjected that he favored n "show down" with the Communists. He added: "Mr. Stalin and his associates won't stop their program of nggres- MVP expansion until the United States takes a firm stand." Morrow asked whether the Unit- fd States would be abandoning Its world leadership by denying aid to Greece and Turkey. Acheson replied: "If the United will not accede to the re- conducted In the Oak Orchard swamp areas yesterday, had "prov- ed the value in the helicopter In state conservation work." Tn addition to herding deer. The list received today showec that instead of the original 01 taverns listed as being violators there are now eight more in the city of Winona and county. Of this number, 51 are In the city and 18 in the county. List Notarized The revised list is sworn to by Lawrence G. Nelson, executive sec- retary of the state liquor control commissioner, who declared in his statement that the 'persons, or- ganizations, shown on the list received today, "are identical with the records submitted by the United States Collector of Internal Revenue to the office of the liquor control commissioner." The statement was then notarized. Sheriff Fort said today that he the department's annual surveys and piannccl to confer with County At- census-taking could be cxped ted tornev w. Kenneth Nissen this alter- by air and frequent checks of deer yards In the Catskllls could be made during the winter months to dc- torney W. Kenneth Nissen this after- noon, and added that he will sub- mit the list to the county commis- sioners who as the governing body tcrmine the health of the of the county must make any revo- sald Brown, An aerial roundup conducted over a three or four day period could drive most deer from a farm arc Lo a section where' their presenc would not constitute A threat t the growing crops." Committee Votes Slash in Labor Groups Budgets House ap- propriations committee voted today to knock tho financial props from under the United States Concllla- if.'.ts made on It, thoro will be ncrvlco by refusing pay for cmivlctlon throughout Edgar L. Warren and a u-orld that a grtut deal of our pro- ferr.lo.is arc merely words." At tht out-irt of testimony. number of top aides. Climaxing ix long feud between Warren and Representative Keefo Acheson quickly settled one Issuo i the action highlighted a which had developed between him bill to finance the La- bor department and the federal security agency Jor the year start- Ing July 1. The measure will be debated In the House next week. Kcefc Is chairman of the subcom- mittee which drafted tho bill. He has accused Warrqn of having been anillatcd in the past with "commu- nist-Inspired fronts" tind of having advocated the right of government workers to strike. The conciliation chief denied knowledge ot any communist-spon- sorship of the groups when he Joined them and told the commit- he has changed his mind about the lawmakers. Ke .'-ild he would arrange to make public later secret "background" document? concerning the situation :n Greece and Turkey. Chairman Eaton (R.-N.J.) had inquired about the "mysterious vrri-cy" of the documents which were handed to committee members vi" t'-rday for their personal In- forrnatkin. Ach'-son wild Eaton had called attention to n demand within committee that copies of the be furnished the press. ITe the State department now to do just that with the that they would be made lhc rlgnt or rcdcrnl Wor'kcr3 to strlke> pji.sc Inter in the day. In addlllon to lts blow to tho Con. I rpwiurr on Turkey dilation service, which nrovides fed- Acheson testified under mediators In labor disputes, the by Representative Mundt (R.- nlso p.ufc hv nnarlv sn that Soviet Insistence on participation In the defense of the also cut by nearly 50 per cent the money President Truman asked for the National Labor Rela- Dardancllw straits Is one of the Uons board. pressures" on thp govern- j In Anting the N.L.R.B. only rr.or.: o. Turkey. of the request- Acheson nl.so had another the committee said it was split licenses. Tho county commissioners will meet in regular! session April 7. The city council at its last regu- 30% Tax Cut Passes House Committee Revamped K nut son Bill to Go to House Next week Washington The House ways and means committee today approved, 18 to nine, the Republi- can-backed bill to slash income taxes by 30 per cent for the small taxpayers and by 20 per' cent for most others. The legislation thus was headed for the House floor for a showdown next Thursday. The committee vote virtually followed party lines. Before "approving the measure, the committee. rejected, 15 to ten, a motion by Representative Dough- ton (D.-N. C.) to postpone tax considerations "until we know what our foreign and other commitments will be" In connection with recent world dcvelopements. The tax cut, under the legisla- tion authored by Ways and Means Chairman Knutson would be effective as of last Jan-' uary 1. Withholding from wages an'd salaries under the pay-as-you-go ystem would be slashed to conform with the tax reduction, effective une 1. Taxpayers would get rebates or any overpayments between Jan- lary and June under the new rates. The bill provides an overall slash from the present Individual tax collections about lor meeting Instructed the city re- annually. corder to obtain a certified list from the Bureau of Internal Revenue be fore It would take action to revok the beer licenses of violators and t date this list has not arrived. Nine Licenses Revoked Meanwhile, throughout the stat law enforcement agencies hav started to act. St. Louis county tool the lead in revoking nine license In two Iron Range communities this week. The Associated Press reported tha at Ely seven beer licenses' wen revoked because of possession of a federal stamp, and at Eveleth the city council revoked two licenses sheriff Sam Owens of St. Louis county reported that 20 places on tho Iron Range hold- federal tax stamps as well as 3.2 beer licenses Action against other places, includ- .ng some'in Duluth, was held In abeyance pending a re-check of the 1st. Winona area sheriffs are also moving carefully and are checking he lists thoroughly before taking action. Sheriff John1- Jacobs, Wobasha, aid the Hat submitted to him by the ommlssloner's office showed only wo violators, .and both of them are utslde Incorporated municipalities. Of the two, he said one has not iccn In business for at least six months and the other does not have he federal stamp In his name. Three At Preston. Flllmore County date today this one with V.'ar.-cri Austin, chief American to the United Nations. Austin has been reported deeply d.Murbed over the possible effect this country's decision to go It tiior.e in thr cti.sc ot Greece and may have on small-nation members nf the world organization. Save IT. N. Face Speculation was rife on Capitol that Austin mlKht urge upon Prudent Trumnn u face-saving u re for the U. N. This possibly v ouiti be r, formal report of the to Secretary General Lie with explanation :.K..v. the U. N. was bypassed this over a suggestion that the board be abolished because It "has made Sheriff Donald Cook said he had ecelved a list but that a check has evealed only three taverns possess- ng both a beer license and a stamp. Of the three, one is no longer in usiness. Houston icrrlgan, Caledonia, said, according :o his list, five places illegally hold both a license and a stamp. Of the five, he said, only one has the fed- eral stamp in the tavern operator's name. Two of the alleged violators are outside incorporated municipal- County Sheriff Beryl no real contribution to industrial 'itles and three are in Caledonia. peace. The NX.R.B. administers Sheriff Kerrigan said he Is going write to the state commission lor In the committee' voting, one Democrat joined 15 Republicans In supoprting the legislation. His name was not Immediately disclosed. Knutson predicted the House will approve the legislation by a com- fortable margin, although Demo- crats on the committee organized their ranks for a last ditch battle. When Time Lags on 23-year-old State Representative Carl M. D'Aquila of Hibblng. "baby" member of the Minnesota lower house, he tries his hand at knitting. Here he gets a lesson from Kathryii Jov.i- novlch (left) of Hibblng and Louise Berry of Preston. (A.P. Photo.) Extension of Wartime Food Controls Urged Washington Senator Aiken said today the cost of liv- ing at home "will rise even higher and more hungry nations may move closer to communism" unless Con- gress extends wartime powers over scarce foods and commodities. Aiken offered these forecasts as The compromise would give more the Senate agriculture, committee than a 20 per cent reduction to I called upon government witnesses about of the in- to amplify the administration's re- come taxpayers. The revised'tax'bill provides: 1. An over-all tax slash this year of with the cuts retroactive to last Janu- ary 1. 2. A 30 per centTOUt for per- sons with 'taxable -income (what's left after personal ex- emptions and deductions) up to Representative Kean (R.-N. one of the sponsors (Continued. on Page 12. Column 6. TAXES quest for continuing the allocation U. S. Denies Grain Start of New Two-Term Limit Passes House Washington. The House omplcted legislative' action today on a resolution to put before the nation a constitutional amendmeni imlting future presidents to two ilccted terms. Approval came in accepting, 81 to :9, a Senate amendment which would allow one man to serve a jossible maximum of ten years in ;he White House. It was a stand- ng vote. The resolution does not require he President's signature. It is re- erred to state legislatures auto- matically and will not become effee- tve until it Is ratified by the law- makers of 36 states. The resolution specifically ex- ludes President Truman from the mitatlon. Wagner collective bargaining act. further information on what stjps While carrying 'more than comparable appropriations for the current year, the total of to- day's bill is less than five per Mr. Truman's budset estimates. The Labor department's share of the total is a cut of from budget figures and from this year's allot- ments. The total Includes for grants to states for public em- he must now follow. tho allotted to the Con- :rr.e only because It is not yet ployment offices. It also includes for action. Committee members said the documents Include discussions of the economic situation In Grenee Turkey and a survey of "the Such a re- view. in nny detail, could hardly iivoiri touching directly upon Rus- nnd her aspirations In that Men. 23-Cent Raise Asked for G. M. Workers LouLsvillr, Ky. The C.I.O. Auto Workers today formal- !y zu-k'-d General Motors Corpora- .'or a 23'.: cent hourly wage in- cre.v.e for an estimated G production workers. spokesmen said the pro- boor.t would brlnt; the avcr- ;n-f nf the crunpuny'H produa- to Sl.SG'-j an hour nnd would cost G.M. about Wisconsin Roadmaster Loses Hand Under Train Beaver Dam, Wis. Mathias Noll, Nonhousing Building Maximum Increased Washington The govern- ment raised from to yesterday the amount that may be spent for nonhouslng construction without a federal permit on farms 47, rondmaster for the Milwaukee of five acres or larger. Road, lost his left hand and partj The celling remains for of his arm In an accident in the rail- road yards at Horlcon Thursday. farms smaller than five acres. to Yugoslavia Woshlnffton The State department has informed Yugo- slavia it will neither- share in a pending relief program for Europe and China nor be per- mitted to buy tons of grain in this country. The department cited as Jts rea- sons doubts that Yugoslavia (1) Has a genuine need of help or (2) Would distribute supplies ef- ficiently and without political dis- crimination. The announcement cnme in ans- wer to a request by the Yugoslav ambassador for Information on what Marshal Tito's communist- cx- programs scheduled to expire teniivnaf Miirsmu Titos commu days hence. dominated government might These include sugar rationing receive from the relief fund If it is approved by Congress. The grain inquiry came by way of tho U. S. embassy In Belgrade. Russia May Be Denied Ore From Germany the authority to specify amounts of Brains, fats and oils used by various food and beverage producers. How- ever, separate legislation to con- tinue -sugar Rationing Is being con- sidered by another Senate commit- tee, the banking group. The Vermont Republican told a reported he believes the sharp climb- of wheat prices in recent month has been caused "by speculators wh hope that Congress will allow thes domestic allocations to die along with export controls.' Present Rent Control Voted to Continue Senate bank- ng subcommittee today aprovcd legislation continuing ren :ontrols through February 20, 1948 without a general increase. Chairman Buck (R.-Del.) said the subcommittee will decide next on how the rent program will be ad- ministered after OPA goes out of business next June 30. The subcommittee discarded pro- 'islons of a previous bill which would have wiped OPA out of the ent picture and handed the con- rol program to the courts. The new measure authorizes state overnors to set up advisory rent ommlttees in each of the 600-odd ireas under rent control. It also provides for removal of ent ceilings on new houses, dwell- ngs renting for or more a month, accommodations which were ot rented between February 1, 1946, ind January 31, 1947, hotels and motor courts. The vould mend: local have advisory committees authority to recom- O.T.C. also made these changes i i. Removal of rent ceilings on an Noll fell when walking along regulations: Exempted all basis, tracks while a train passing boards, movable partitions and' 2. Increases on an area basis. but trainmen did not see the acci- dent. Noll made his way to a near- by home for help. He is in a hospital movable signs from permit require- ments; set limit on altera- tions or repairs on. all groin, coal, or cement elevators without permit. Cheese Holding Periods Shortened in Wisconsin MacIUon. Wis. Milton But- director of the state clepart- n.T.' it: agriculture, l.isucd an order ye.-.-.'-rciay providing for .shorter hold- for brick cheese. the order, which la effective the holding time for brick manufactured In May, June, or September will be rerlu'-cf! from ten to seven days. The bru-k checv Industry him ro- the reduction. 3. Special adjustments in "hard- ship" cases. Bund Reported By Congressman By Douglas B. Cornell Washington Representative McDowell (R.-Pa.) said today he saw in New York last week what he considers the start of a new Ger- man-American bund. Acting on a tip to the House com- mittee on un-American activities, of which he is a member, McDowell attended a meeting as an unknown. "It turned out to be what we think Is the beginning of :i now bund." the told re- porters. "We have decided we'd setter look into tho entire slt.ua- McDowell said there may be slml- ar activity In Chicago and th.it icarlngs may be held there and In York later. He said what he 'ound out in New -York was a. big actor in the creation of a new un- Berlin A joint American activities subcommittee, f which he is chairman, to investi- gate Fascist organizations in Amcr- ca. McDowell said he heard frequent cferenccs to the "old movement" American announcement said today and that apparently a skeleton or- Immediate Action Asked By Marshall Strong State Rights, 2-House Legislature Stressed by Bevin By John M. Miditower Moscow U. S. Secretary Marshall called on Ihe council of foreign ministers today lo sot, plans for the creation of a German gov- rnmont In motion at once joth he nnd Britain's Ernest Bcvin. irc.scntcd proffnuns for the orsan- xntlon of n fedcrnllKcd Gorman nation. The council. In a brief .vssion. igrccd to invlto representatives of lie Austrian government here 1m- iicdlately for discussion of the Austrian peace treaty. V. M. Molotov, .Soviet forclsn minister, said ho already had :urcd Foreign Minister Karl Grub- Reparations Moscow Forrlcn Sec- retary Krncst Bcvfn revealed in thr council of foreign minis- ters tonight that thr United Kingdom had received repara- tions of more than from Germany since the end of the war. r. of Austria, that visas would be ssucd for the Austrlans assigned o come to Moscow. Thc action on Austria came after Tarshall had urged the council to rcnk the Austrian treaty Impasse n what constitutes German assets that country and had expressed ope that the treaty would be coni- letcd In the Moscow meeting. He .said that It was for this pur- ose completing the treaty the Austrian government rep- esentativcs should be called into onsult-ition. Bevin Inld before the council a x-step plan for the creation of fcdcralizod government structure itended to make Germany sclf- veroliiK. democratic state. Britain's views on the govcrn- ent structure for Germany t forth in a. 000-word paper. It culled for creation of ft two- ouse legislature along the lines the U. S. Senate and House of a president with- ut executive powers and strong or German Iron and steel to Soviet zone and were considering total embargo because the Russian zone has failed to fulfill terms of a trade agreement. The joint statement said tha nte rights. Bevin was the first of the four inistcrs here to place his Ideas the structure of the German nte before the council. Informants said the British plan visioned a lower legislative cham- of It survived. jber elected According lo population Thc old bund disappeared after'and an upper chamber elected on .its leader, Fritz Kuhn, was deported the basis of a fixed number of rep- to Germany. A former newspaperman. Mc- Dowell reported some 100 men and women of all uses, mostly of Ger- man origin, gathered in New York Its commitments under the agree- ment with the combined American- British zone to deliver foodstuffs and various other materials in ex- change for steel and Iron. On the other hand, the statement said, deliveries of iron and stec up to the end of February had fulfilled 95 per cent of the British- American commitment. "This failure (of the Russians) has placed the United States-British zone in an extremely difficult posi- the statement asserted. Fumes in Car Kill Farmer Near Westby Wcstby, Wis. Fred John- on, 52, township of Coon farm nborer, was found dead near here Wednesday in his car near the home if Adolph Brcnnum, where Johnson ras visiting Tuesday evening. Brennum told Ole Jackson. Ver- lon county coroner, that Johnson eft the Brennum home about 10 p. Johnson was discovered in his ar, the motor running. In a lane ear the farm home. Jackson called he death accidental asphyxiation. trouble getting In. They talked hi both English and German, McDowell said. Since he does not know Gerrran, lie said, he complained to a neighbor that his father never had had time to tench him the language and "they very obligingly conducted the rest of the meeting in English." Truman to Speak at A.P. Luncheon Tru- inan. will address the annual lunch- con of The Associated Press In New York April 21, the White House an- nounced today. Presidential Press Secretary "hnries G. Ross said Mr. Truman will speak at noon in the Grand ballroom of the Waldorf Astoria. He said the luncheon will be pre- sided over by Robert McLean, pres- dent of The Associated Press and of the Philadelphia Evening' Bul- etin. While the address Is yet to be pre- pared. Ross said, he estimates it will run about 15 or 20 minutes. (Contfnucd on PLAN FOIS. Weather 12. Column JL) Under Secretary Of State Dean Acheson (lar right) testifies before members of the House foreign affairs committee (rear) expressing a conviction that American intervention in Greece and Turkey will not "lead to war." Committee members shown nro (left to Representatives James Richards CD.- 3. C.I. John Kee (D.-W. Sol Bloom (D.-N. Chairman OharJ.es Eaton (R.-N. John Vorys Bartel Jonkman Frances Bolton Smith Walter Judd James O. Fulton (R.-Pa.) and Jacob Javlts (R.-N. (A.P. Wirephoto.) Dearborn Lifeboat Search Ends warships, sweeping square miles of the Central Pacific for a lifeboat and 12 or 13 men from the broken tanker Fort Dearborn, will complete their search this morning. In Thursday's operations, the destroyer Charles P. Cecil found a ration can and an oil slick but was unable to determine their source. The destroyer Perkins came upon an old liferaft and a slab wood, and the destroyer Tucker exploded a floating mine. The sea search for the lifeboat, which disappeared minutes after] the Fort Dearborn cracked In two on a stormy midnight sea, March 12, covers a rectangle roughly 80 miles wide and 360 miles long. Mayor of Frederic New U. of W. Regent Madison, Wis. Dr. Raymond G. Arveson, mayor of the village of LilientU Will Scrape Past Senate, A.P. Check Indicates ing under a recess appointment iwaslVlnct'on...........53 36 since last January 1. RlVEli'BULLETIN By .Tack Bell E, Lili cnthal has the present support of a majority of the Senate, an Associ- ated Press check showed today. Hence his confirmation as chair- man of the atomic control commis- sion is almost certain unless some senators change their minds during debate. Of 74 members willing to say how ;hey would vote today on the con- troversial nomination clear majority of the 95 qualified mem- they intend to support the nomination. Senator Taft (R.- Ohio) said debate 011 the issue probably will start Monday. Forty-three senators have an- nounced their support of Llllcnthal. Six others said privately they in- tend to vote "yes" but do not.want their names used before they an- Frederic, in Polk county, bewxmc ainounce their stand In the Senate, regent of the University of Wlscon- Twenty-five listed as sin Thursday upon winning unanl- opposed to confirmation. Five of mous confirmation from the state; these, 'however, are withholding pub- senate. He succeeds the late Michael J. Cleary ol Milwaukee for the term jlicatlon of their names until they can tell their colleagues in Senate speeches why they do not want to ending Mny 1, 1955. Dr. Arvc.son the former T.V.A. chieftain con- a past president of the state mcdl- tinue at the helm of the atomic coni- cal society. FEDERAL FORECASTS Minnesota: Light snow beginning northwest by this evening and spreading over south and east to- night and early Saturday. Clearing by Saturday afterr.oon. Wanner northwest nnd extreme north to- night and southeast In extreme south Saturday. Wisconsin: Clearing this after- noon and tonight. Increasing clou- diness Saturday with light rain or snow west early Saturday afternoon and in ea-st Saturday afternoon or evening. Warmer south Saturday. Winona and vicinity: Partly cloudy tonight and Saturday. Occa- sional light snow late tonight or eoriy Saturday morning. Rising' tem- perature Saturday afternoon and night. Low tonight 24; high Sat- urday LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the C4 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 37; minimum, 30; noon. 35; precipitation, one inch of snow; sun sets tonight at son rises tomorrow at, G-.04. ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. Chicago .............44 32 .07 Denver 56 32 Los Angeles..........60 51 Miami ...............80 54 .05 Minneapolis-St. Paul. 35 25 .19 New Orleans New York Phoenix Seattle 69 50 83 64 mission. Lllienthal has been scrv- With the Lllienthal nomination and those of his commission col-, leagues likely to be debated all oflRcd next week, 21 senators either not made up their minds or declin to say even privately how they would vote. In this group are five Democrats and 10 Republicans, including sev- eral G.O.P. first tenners who may present a fairly solid front against :onflrmation. Most observers be- lieve that a majority of the 21 will So against conlirmation, thus pro- viding a relatively close count on Jie llnal vote. openly opposes Lllien- thal as being "too soft" toward communism told a reporter he liinks the outcome still hangs in ;he balance. Senator McKellar fD.-Tenn.l has charged that Lllienthal permitted communists to infiltrate the T.V.A. organization while he headed it, Jut members of the Senate atomic committee apparently found little jasis for these charges in voting to 1 to support 1.he nomination. Those who have announced their Hand publicly include McCarthy RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change :4 3.i City 7.3 .1 ___ 12 3.5 Dam 4, T.W. Dam 5. T.W. Dam 5A, T.W. 13 4.5 2.5 3.6 5.3 Dam 5. Pool Dam 5, T.W. 4.n Dakota............. 8.0 Dam 7. Pool....... ?.5 Dam 7, T.W....... 4.8 La Crossc 32 4.8 Tributary Streams Chippcwa at Durand.. 4.4 Zumbro -it Th.cilm.in.. 3.4 Buffalo above Alma.... Trempcaleau at. Dodge. 2.4 BJnck nl, NelllsviJle----4.4 Black at Galesvillc.... 4.1 Root at Houston....... 6.3 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings lo Guttcnbcrf) From Alma to La Crosse rises the next 24 hours will average .1 foot. From Genoa southward to dam No. 10. rises will bir .2 to .4 foot. Abovr Lake Pepin thoro will be little change. .5 .1 .1 2 .4   

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