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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, March 19, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 19, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER ftlly tonight and Til s Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of OKOLSKY His New Column Dally on Editorial Pace VOLUME 47. NO. 26 MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 19, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Millworker Killed in Freak Accident Thompson Declared Governor of Georgia State Supreme Court Rules Talmadge Out Decision to Be Final at Time of Plea for Rehearing Over-All Solution of German Lewis Cedes Problem Held Key to Success Atlanta The state supremo court ruled today that M. E. Thomp- son is the governor of Georgia. In a five to two decision, the state's highest tribunal rejected claims ot Herman Tolmadgo and thnt TalmndRC's election by the legislature was unconstitu- tional. The supreme r.ourt thus moved to end nine weeks of political tur- moil In which rival governors oc- cupied the capltol and fought for control of state agencies and de- partments. Talmadge operated from the executive suite, however, and a majority of the departments rec- omtzed him as governor. The court's decision will not be- come flnal until disposition of a mo- tion for rehearing expected to be filed by the losing side. Both sides have said there would be no attempt to carry the dispute Into the federal courts. Lieutenant Governor Thompson, who claimed recognition as "acting governor" after resignation of Gov- ernor ZUls Arnall, appealed to the supreme court .when the lower courts dismissed his suit to oust Talmadse. Talmadgo was elected by the leg- islaturr to tho four-year term of his father, Eugene Talmadge, when the red-callused champion of "white supremacy" succumbed December 21, ISMG, Just three weeks before ,'n- auguration. The supreme court held that the death of Eugene Talmadge prevent- ed him from qualifying at the time fixed by law thus creating the ne- cessity for Governor ArnaU to con- tinue in omcc. Tor court further held that tho voluntary resignation of Araall Jan- uary 18. 1M7. "immediately Imposed upon the lieutenant governor the duties of and added "he is now entitled to perform, all duties and exercise all the authority which by the constitution and Jaws are imposed upon the governor of this Itatc." The decision threw both houses o? the general assembly into confu- sion and both called adjournments when presiding officers were unable to restore order. Tho senate, Settlement by Piecemeal Said to Mean Failure BULLETIN Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov told the council of foreign ministers to- night that after hearing the differing- views of the United States, Britain and France still believed agreement possible in Moscow among the four powers of the critical German economic, program. By John M. Hightower Moscow Top American of- ficials predicted today that unless strike last fall. To Supreme Court Mandate Termination Notice Withdrawn in Letter to Secretary Krug L. Lewis today withdrew his contract termin- ation notice to the government ef- fective March 31 in compliance with a Supreme court mandate. Lewis sent a 20-word letter toj Secretary of Interior Krue announc- ing that the notice which he had jiven Krug last November 151 "is aereby unconditionally withdrawn." It was this notice of contract ter- mination that touched, off a 17-day the council of foreign ministers agrees over- all solution for Germany's current problems there will be no solution at all. These informants said the council meetings had reached a point at which it was apparent that great difficulties would be encountered in getting to such an over-all solu- tion, and added that the situation Lewis called off that strike until March 31, His action today thus ap- parently erases the possibility of re- newal of the work stoppage at the lend of this month. Without a contract, the miners traditionally do not work. Thus. Lewis' action continues in force the contract he signed with Krug late last spring-after the gov- ernment had seized the mines to end The Army's First four-jet bomber, which made its initial flight at Muroc, Calif., is pictured as it made ground tests several days previously. .The heavy bomber, built by North American Aviation and designated the B-45, is described by the army as having "ex- ceedingly high" speed. (A.P. Georco Bldault France's foreign minister, shakes hands V. M. Molotov, Soviet foreign minister, as TJ. B, Secretary of State George C. Marshall looks on at an Informal meeting of tho "Big Four" in Moscow shortly before the first session of the peace treaty conference. Two Rescued After 11 Days Adrift in Gulf sun-black- ened Virginians were recovering from exposure and near-starVation today after being adrift 11 days in a small power boat in the Gulf of Mexico. The two men, W. Horace Blanch- ard, 32, Newport News and Charles King, 18, Hampton, were able to talk of their dramatic rescue yesterday by an army amphibian only n few gnced In debate over a sales tax hours before a search which cov- bill. adjourned until noon, while the house adjourned until 2 p. m. House adjournment followed a 30- mlnute debate on whether both houses should be called immedi- ately Into Joint session to hear on address from Acting Governor Thompson. Tanned, Rested Truman Flying Back to Capital By Ernest B. Vaccaro Key West, Tanned by sun and wind and relaxed after a week's rest, President Truman re- turns to Washington today to tackle anew the problems of an over-shift- cred square miles of gulf waters was scheduled to end. They told of long hours of hunger and cold as they' tossed about in their 22-foot cabin cruiser, and of using tholr last Hare In a desperate gamble to attract an army search plane from MacDlll Field. Spotted by The plane saw the Hare and ra- dioed the amphibian whlch( effected the rescue. "I guess we've been Blanchard said, lying on a hospital bed at MacDlll Field. "The only things that saved us were the Lord, a stout boat and the army air forces. "We had 12 signal flares when started, but we had fired all but one. We really prayed when I flred tha last one. When the big army plan dipped its wings and turned to International scene. wards us I knew we were saved. With the Moscow government stllll "Wo cnst oft trom tnc b'S Labor Relation Courts Proposed Washington Senators Fcrjruxon (tt.-Mich.) jinil Smith (B.-N. J.) today Introduced bill to create a system of fed- eral labor relations courts with jurisdiction over "a large ma- jority" of labor-management disputes. The courts would have the right to issue injunctions In la- bor cases, a courae now forbid- den by the NorrlH-La act in disputes Involving private Industry. They would have jurisdiction to interpret collective bargain- Ing contracts and' to review ac- tions of the administrators of tho national labor relations (Wapner) act, the fair labor standards (wage-hour) act and the railway labor act. Ferguson told the Senate, "We are In a state or near-anarchy" when it comes to industrial din- putcs and the time has come to subject them to "the legal discipline of a civilized society." In Germany now is so badly split' a 59-day stoppage. up that piecemeal settlements seem- ed impossible. Unless Russia, in particular. Is willing to go along with some eort of sweeping program to wipe out nil zonal boundaries and organize German life on a national basis, they continued, the Moscow confor- It was this contract that Lewis sought to end last fall. The govern-i ment obtained an order from Fed-' oral Judge T.Alan Goldsborough i directing Lewis and his miners to call off a strike that followed in November. When Lewis refused, he and the Youngdahl Asks Public Support on Housing ence, in this respect nt least, seemed miners were held guilty in contempt. doomed to fall. Resent Charges Persons who have sat through th first eight sessions of the counc said tho earlier, easy, relationship seem to be souring now, especlall between Secretary of State Oeorg C. Marshall and British Forcig Secretary Ernest Bevin on hand and Foreign Minister. V? M. Molotov of Russia on the other. They said the two Western nun isters particularly resented Sovle repetition of charges against Brit ish-American conduct in Germany (Continued on Page 16, Column 5 MOSCOW officially silent on his call fo American financial and cconom support of Greece and Turkey J their resistance to Communism, th President win fly back to tho Whit House to look over developments a hand. His special plane is due to leav the Boca Chlca airport, five mile from here, at 1 p. m. putting him 1 "Washington about four and a ha hours later. Fctllng tired, and under Instruc lions from his physician to take brief rest, Mr. Truman flew her from Washington Wednesday im mtdmttly after asking Congress mpptlnK in a Joint session, to au spending up to. to ntrt Greece and Turkey to stem thi- nnward march of Communism Thf President's message drew r.hnrp crltlcl.im from Izvcstia. which ti-.unlly voices tho views of th JSovlrt government. Tho Prcsldon maintained silence In the face o this first outspoken attack agoins rus enunciation of the new can foreign policy course. There was no comment from the President on yesterday's demand bj Senator Tydlnss for an immediate disarmament confer- cncr. Mr. Truman likely will communi- cate with Secretary of State George C. Marshall, at Moscow, shortly after his return, to obtain the latest reaction of his top-ranking cabinet officer to the Russian atti- tude. Mr. Truman received confidential reports from Marshall over the weekend, but these dealt largely with preliminary work on the for- ministers .conference. The President looked in fit shape whiTi he greeted reporters here ycr.tcrdny at a showing of the latest B'ib Hope movie, "My Favorite Brunette." immediately after his arrival from the Fort Taylor beach where he a brief swim and a sun bath. the yacht Rhojan King rclatec "about daybreak on Saturday morn March 8, because it was leak ing and the captain thought w were about 20 miles from shore. Th little boat had been previously dam aged both in the bow and stern, W had no food, no cigarettes, no much water and no compass. W figured we could get along by fol lowing the sun." Fall to Catch Fish Blanchard said, "We tried to fist with one line we found aboari using a trolling hook and som feathers, but wo never got a thing. "We both prayed a he added 'and I never lost hopo that w would be found. I have a wife one three children at homo." Captain James Blanchard, 38 Newport News, brother of Horace remained alone aboard tho yach and kept it afloat by balling con- Inuously with a bucket for seven days before being towed to Key West by a navy tug Sunday. Committee Votes in Foreign Relief House for- ign affairs committee voted today or expenditure -of for ellef in five European countries nd China, While it was acting, a House ap- roprlatlons subcommittee discussed 1th Former President Herbert Hoover and Secretary of War Rob- rt Patterson the need for the re- ef. The appropriations committee must handle legislation making the ctual appropriation. Tho bill approved by the foreign ffalrs group simply lays down the ollcy and establishes conditions indcr which the relief money may o spent. Congress insisted today on a broad accounting of administration for- eign policy before granting Amer- ican dollars to build fences against Communism in Greece and Turkey. As the lawmakers settled down to translate President Truman's request into legislation, many said it will be a close finish between Gov. Youngdahl Moves to Oust Savage Mayor St. Luther Youngdahl today said that Mayor George C. Allen, Jr., of Savage, who pleaded guilty yesterday to a charge of wilful neglect of official duty faces ouster as mayor under state law on the basis -of falling to up- hold his oath of of lice. Both the governor and Attorney General Burnquist pointed out thai Allen must vacate In accordance with state law which lists as a rea- son "conviction of any infamous crime or of any offense involving violation of his official office." However, the consent of the at- torney general is necessary before such proceedings can bD brought but Burnquist indicated if a request is made that he would give his per- mission, in' The Bovernor said, In connection Republicans Ask Full Report on Foreign Policies By Alex H. Singleton with the fining of the mayor and three other persons yesterday that such "public officials should resign and permit the people to elect offi- cials in their places who will stand by their oaths and enforce the The mayor and three other persons were fined yesterday by District Judge Joseph' Moriarity of Scott county after they pleaded from Greece. Evidence mounted, meantime, that the Greek-Turkish aid bill is only one aspect of a developing Ameri- can program "to help weak nations vard off Communism, not only through economic aid but by dem- onstrating its armed might abroad This strategy seemed to bo bound up in the administration's decision o send a powerful naval task, force Mowing through the Mediterranean icxt month to Russia's gateway, the Dardanelles. The demonstration ot sea and air might will come at a this country's policy- makers plan to send into Greece nd Turkey aid in the form of money, material and military ad- Isors. ifoshida Asks That J. S. Troops Stay the United States affairs and the i our policy in China." nection with village liquor store. Mayor Allen, pleading guilty to n Minnesotans Get Tax Lewis was fined and the states. United Mine Workers were finet The Supreme court up held the contempt convictions Lewis' fine. The court, however, directed tha the union fine be reduced to St. Paul Governor Luther Youngdahl last night made a radio appeal to the public lor support of his public housing legis- lation and pointed out that Minnesota was 3agfrlng behind other 000, provided Lewis withdraw hL notice ending the Contract with the government within five days after issuance-of -the Supreme-con date. .f mun- Subsequently, on petition of the government, the Supreme cour speeded effectiveness of Its order Its mandate is to be filed with the federal district court tomorrow. Thus, by obeying the court order today, Lewis saves the mine union a possible additional fine or 000. Copies of Lewis' letter also went to members of the U.M.W. notifying them that he had called off his no- tice to end the contract with the government. Lewis and his attorneys have been conferring for the past two days, since the Supreme court consented to the Justice department's plea for speed in enforcing the court's order. Change in China Policy Predicted Senator Brew- ter (R.-Me.) said today he is cer- "Wiping out blighted areas and unsanitary and unsafe houses will improve our cities, increase tax rolls and contribute to financial strength of the gov- ernor said. "More important than all this is j the improvement that will come the welfare ot the people." JJClUI C The governor said that "we can not afford to say that we haven't the money to eliminate bad housing and slums." "We can not atford to permit the hardship, discontent and general breakdown in the home that bad housing entails. It is a problem to which we must devote our best ef- forts." No Income Tax July 1 Seen By Francis M. LeMay Washington The chances faded today for any cut in income taxes taking effect before July 1. Representative Harold Knutson chairman of the tax- writing House ways and means com- mlt-tce, acknowledged that a study Is being made to determine wheth- er that start of the 1348 fiscal be specified. His measure for a 20 per cent across-the-board tax slosh would make tt retroactive to January 1. tives Charles Root, Knutson's announcement to news- A few hours before the governor went on the air, a modified version of his housing bill was introduced n tho legislature. Authors In the senate were Senators Donald Wright and Gerald Mullin, Minneapolis, and B. G. Novak, St. Paul. House authors were Representa- Robison Gibbs Is Crushed Under Tractor A. D. M. Employe, Fatally Injured, Lives Two Hours TMrty-six-ycar-old Robison A. ibbs, millworker at the Archer Daniels Midland Company, 850 West Third street, was crushed death underneath an over- ;uraed tractor early this mom- ing. He was injured about a. in., rushed to the Winona. Gen- eral hospital by ambulance, ar- riving at a. m, and died ibout 7 a. m. Gibbs died as a result of a frcalc ccidwn. He was driving a tractor vhich was towing two loaded box ars along a track toward the mam lant. The tractor, attached to the cad car by a heavy chain, stalled long side the tracks. The momen- um of the two cars rolled them by ic tractor and the pull on the overturned the tractor. Foreman is Witness Sylvanis Severe, 106 Stone orcman at the plant, a witness to le fatal accident, said that -when e saw the danger in the stalled ractor he yelled to GJbbs to Jump. Ibbs, said Severs, tried to but it as too late. Gibbs was pinned underneath and was necessary to bring a wrecker the scene of the accident before e could be extricated and taken in the city ambulance to the hospital by police. Carrol Syverson, assistant super- intendent at the said that Gibbs had been employed at flrm since March 25, 3046, and that he had performed the operation he was engaged in early this morning many times previously. Although aot a witness to the ac- cident, Syverson said that it has been reported to him that the trac- tor was not struck by the cars and that the overturning' was caused only by the pull on the chain. Ho said thnt after the tractor over- turned it was grazed by the moving earn. The accident occurred .near easterly limits cf the North West- ern railway yards. Born in County Gibbs, who resided at ,422 South 3aker street, was born April 5, 1310, u Warren township, Winona coun- ,y, the son of Mr.-and Mrs. Wil- liam Gibbs. He and his wife, the 'ormcr Blanche Frisch, lived on a. farm near Lcwiston until Septem- ber, 1945, when they moved to Wi- nona. Survivors are his wife: his par- ents; one sister, Sarah, at home, and one brother. Harry. Wlaona. Funeral services will be held Frl- at 2 p. m. at the Bneitlow fu- o ce o ews- Walter Rogosheske, Sauk 'Rapids; (men came after Representative home, the Rev. Charles Mose- john Hartle, Owatonna; Don Lun- Kean (R.-N, a member of Pastor of the McKtaley drigan. Pine River, and Judson Hil- ton, St. Paul. Meanwhile In the legislature, the awmakers considered a wide variety f proposed legislation. Here's what was done: 1. W. S. Moscrip of Lake Elmo of he livestock sanitary board headed 3. group.of farmers and others ap- jearing before the senate finance ?'iU be a ln ommlttee to recommend that funds Jnited States government's policy n China "within the next two weeks" giving firmer support to ihiang Kai-shek. Brewster also said he hopes that uthority of General Douglas Ma'c- will be "extended to China." "They can't urge that we kiss iommunlsts in China and kick them n the Maine senator told wnys and means group, declared Ills determination to press for a delay In the effective date, Might Unbalance Budget Kean insisted that making tbe cut apply back to the first of the year might kill current prospects for a balanced federal budget this fiscal first since 1930. Senator Taft chairman ,of the potent Republican Senate be provided for the establishment policy committee, already has sug- (Continucd on rage 1C, Column 'al will be in Woodlawn cemetery. gested that any reduction be made Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Generally fair tonight and Thursday. No im- portant temperature change. Low tonight 22; high Thursday 45. Minnesota Mostly cloudy this afternoon with light snow southwest and west central. Clearing tonight YOUXGDAHt eporters. "UNRRA is demanding More Than Million Cars Made in 1947 Detroit The car industry's i effective at the start of the govern-; preceded by light snow early tonight ment's accounting year, July 1. Jin extreme southwest. Generally Confronted meanwhile by Thursday. A little colder west dfemanrtimr har WP le Colnmmlt influence BrewTtM to erewster aecimea to Truman iUlUted States Production of passenger cars and trucks will opposition to the Knutson across- the-board proposition, ways and means Republicans resumed work tonight. northeast and mostly cloudy west and south th on a revision that would give aiaftemoon and tonight. Clearing deeper cut to small taxpayers. Thursday. Little change in temper- Democrats Oppose Cut jaturc. Knutson called for the study after I LOCAL WEATHER a show of hands at a meeting of the i Official observations for the 24 the the ource of his information about a up for the the mark this G.O.P. steering committee ending at 32 m. today: barring a major assembly line tie-" change of policy In China" but said he data came from "thosp who I first be. excess of this is far below the in- Bleated a majority prefers to Rive Maximum. 41; minimum. 16: noon. more rellor to pcrsons wlth smaUJ37: precipitation, none: sun sets to- Democrats for the most part ap- at night at sun rises tomorrow '61 strongly about certain chances dustry's productive capacity, it is Pcar be standing firm against any TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE .ei strongly about certain changes Umn threc tax cut at all this year. i charge of willful neglect-of official: duty, was given a choice of a fine or a year in jail but the court ruled thnt if Allen paid now Refunds of SI. federal Income taxpayers had received and another on July 1, in refunds up to this balance of the fine would be sus-'woclc' Elmer F. Kelm, collector of pendod. Allen paid the initial Allen's father, former deputy sheriff and former village marshal, was given a choice of a fine or six months in Jail after pleading guilty to a similar charge. Tho court ruled that if Allen paid now, the remainder would be sus- pended. He paid Jerome Jaspers and Joseph Topic of Shakopee who pleaded guilty to charges of keeping gambling devices were given a choice of fine each or six months in Jail, and both paid the fines. The charges were outgrowths of internal revenue, reported. Tho .re- funds were paid to persons. achieved in the like period of 1946; optTations had gone well into July Representative Doughton (D.-N.j Chicago Max. 40 04 former ways and means chair-iDenver 63 30 las-; year before output told reporters on hearing Angeles C2 55 units. (Republican plans to revise the tax I Miami 72 67 The current rate of production have marched up Paul.. 42 22 J--- 37 28 76 52 CS 42 Pet. .13 and indicated manufacturing levels hm and down so mnn-v that I'NOW Orleans for the second quarter ftlvc reason- con.t u'3 wlth t-hc York able assurance that the States Chamber this year well come close to Md Congress today __-. Tint. nf car-and-truck mark. Out of the Mouths of Babes flat, reduction of individual liicomo Washington i taxes by "20 per cent or even more' I Is of "urgent importance." on investigation by State Public Examiner Richard Golling. Highway 61 Contract for Repairs Let Madison, They Shouldn't Have Kindergarten Tells Diplomat New Out of the. mouths of the kindergarten, class at public school 90 in Queens has come the answer to the prob- In a statement fllcd with the House ways and means committee, the chamber said It believed the] cut could be granted this year and at the same time a sizeable tion- could be made Jn the national j5am The national association of manu- 5A> T-w- facturers previously filed :v statc- KlVEtt BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. Sljise Today Change Red Wing H 2J Lake City Reads highway are serving." The two letters are circulated in schools through- s going to insure world peace, Americans must remain indeflnite- r in Japan after the Japanese eru Yoshida said today. I draining and temporary surf kindergarten solution- In an interview with The Asso-jof six miles of U. S. highways 14, "War is fighting. People hate ated Press, the premier voiced i and fil in Vernon county was take people's .clothes away ;rong approval of General Mac-1 proved by Acting Governor Renne- lem the world-is using its best brains and millions cut dollars to solve. The children, composed a message to Warren Austin, senior United States representative United Nations, who replied that I they had confirmed his faith "in the; don great purpose upon which 51 nations ?nti everybody? And make some mcnt supporting the 20 per cent across-the-board tax cut proposed by Ways and Means Chairman Knutson. Winona 13 Dam G, Pool....... Dam 0. T.W. rthur's recent proposal for treaty egotlatlons and end of tho occu- ation but made it plain that he referred American protection to mt of the United Nations upon gning the peace. bohm today. The contract, with A. Guthrle iSc Company, St. Paul, Minn., was designated to Initiate construction of a major highway between the Illinois state line and 'La Crosse, WIs. They should think not to make a war. They shouldn't have guns. "In Sunday school they say: 'Thou shalt not kill.' People have to be good. The thing Is to make them very kind by giving them good training ia this world. cows and horses and lambs? And apple trees and pear trees and peach trees? Cairo at St. Paul in Earliest River Opening dock here at S a. m. today, setting like that. "Please ask God kindly to make the children across the ocean, and the Americans little boy anew record for early opening of Black at Ncillsville----4.2 __ Black at Galesvillc.... 4.5 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.6 Root at. Houston 0.4 navigation on the upper Mississippi "And train the people to makeover. The tug's barge- tow carried things: To be a barber, and things.coal, steel and pulpwood. rpftc previous record for early ar-j rival was set March 25, 1858. by the 7.0 .1 3.3 .1 2.4 3.4 .1 05 .1 4.9 .2 Dakota 7.3 Dam 7, Pool....... 3.4 Dam 7. T.W....... 4.5 J La Crosse 12 4.6 Tributary Streams Chlppewa at Durand.. 4.7 .1 Zumbro at Thcilman.. 33 Buffalo above Alma----3.G .3 Trempealeau at Dodge. 2.5 J3 .1 .3 .1 .1 Grey Eagle. Last year the first, tup; arrived March 26. and girl in every make The Cairo is scheduled to start them better. "We love you." 11IVER FORECAST (From Hastings to GntUnberc) During the next 30 hours there will be no Important changes throughout this district except for jdownriver Thursday with, a tow ofjslight further falls of J to foot 1 grain, and merchandise. J below Prairio du ChJcn.   

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