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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, February 26, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 26, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w fffnlfhl Thursday, flurrlpl Innldlt. Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press VOLUME 47. NO. 8 WJNONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1947 Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY Rend Nrw Column Dally on Editorial FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Sicilians Flee Erupting Volcano Talk of Pork Price Expert Says Buyers Will Boycott 30-Cent Sugar Seen If Controls Are Removed Wanhlnctnn The Agrlcul turr department today cllscoutitc of pork chop with nn ii.v.erflon that housowlve. won't f.tinul for It. Hlc.yrocknl.ing hug prices merelj rff.rrt a r.eiiNomil   And hr told n reporter he ex- jx-cts consumer means housewives with their dander force a downturn In those prices soon. Department economists held to their contention that food prlco levels renohed their postwar peak last October, after most govern- ment controls were removed. Some Down "It Is possible thai prices during the first half of the year may hole! their own, or Increase, very t-ild James P. Cavln, farm nnd food price economist. "But we see no possibility of their climbing bock to anywhere near the peak of last October." Some foods already have declined in cost since thtr first of the year and further decreases are expected. In this class nro fluid milk, butter, cheese, evaporated milk, dry milk, fcrgs, poultry, fresh iind frozen fish, Trexh and processed vegetables, and canned fruits. The department's economics bu- reau. In a recent food situation re- port, predicted a downturn In prices of better of beef In the .spring and summer, when market- ings of cattle now on grain feed ihould Increase. Officials pointed out .that prices of eggs and some dairy products havo dropped to levels requiring the government to act to unsure producers minimum prices guaran- Russian Demands Expected After Approval of U.S. Plan Lieutenant General John D. Hodge commander of U. 8. occupation forces In southern Korea, drops a hint to newsmen sur- rounding him at the White House that the Russians arc secretly training Korean troops behind the 'Iron curtain" In northern Korea. Secretary of War Robert Patterson (left) accompanied Hodge on his visit to President Truman, Wlriephoto.) Special Rights in Manchuria May Be Asked By Edward E. Bomar YVanhlns-Jon Russia's out- of-thc-bluo endorsement of United States trusteeship over Pacific Is- lands onco ruled by Japan provided an unexpected new twist today to Groundwork Laid for Peace Pacts Sovlut-Amerlcan relations. Moscow's note saying: Russia tlocnis It entirely fair for the United States to keep control of the 023- odd Islands left diplomatic authori- ties guessing whether thuro might x more behind the move than nftets ;he eye. They hoped It forecasts Improved jrospects lor a European peace Kct- tlemcnt at next month's Moscow conference of the "Big Four" foreign ministers. But because of the al- most unbroken series of recent dlsu- [reements between Washington and German, Austrian Treaty Problems Aired by Deputies London Deputy foreign mlnlutci'M of the "Big Four" iid- Jolirncd on schedule last night, Ktlll snugged In dlsagrecmont on pre- liminary problems surrounding a peace treaty for Germany and leav- ing tlie Austrian peace treaty large- ly unwritten. Despite the lack of accord, the deputies expressed belief that they had accomplished, a great deal In the way of, laying groundwork for ihe foreign ministers- council meet- ing at Moscow March 10, and there was a general air of eordlnl good will at a dinner 'for the deputies and negotiators lout night. The deputies working on the Measure Sent To Congress kloscow thuy'privately were wary settlement bogged down In; ithe final session of their slx-wecks- lold conference yesterday In. a dls- Secretary of State Marshall on how tncir disagreements a possible diplomatic maneuver. MarnhnU Keeps ils own counsel in announcing the Soviet action yesterday. He declin- sd comment on a reporter's suggcs- lon that Russia might be trying o set a precedent to justify her with a report summarizing Truman Submits Details of Unification Plan Tru nan sent to Congress today th draft of a proposed bill calling fo the unification of the armed Tho legislation would up u na ilonal defense establishment, undc i civilian secretary of national dc cnsc who would have cabinet rank The legislation would bring undo he defense establishment equally mportant departments of the army he navy and the air force. Each or the three branches of tin ,rmcd services would have a Bccre itry to direct Its activities as an ndlvidual unit. The three secretaries army, nnvy niid iilr urn would operate under direction f the secretary of national defense One Cabinet Post Wliile- all four Hccretarics would be subject to confirmation by the Senate, the Whlti! House said only the secretary of -national defense would have cabinet rank. The President, In a letter sub- declared he would not 'ostwar land acquisitions. the points upon which Britain fTokyo dispatches today, France, the United States and Rus- sia were In agreement and listing n teed them by law, Oraln prices have Inct'en.ied vtint In recent weeks under tho Impact ot a heavy foreign demand. Hut officials expect a reaction when the 1M7 winter wlieut bring foreciuit (.he larKcst of rec-, harvested hi tho spring imcl! summer. Additional ri-a.'imirance for wor-( rlefi consumers cutue from Dr. Ed- wlr, C. Nounie, ctiulrrnan of u three-man panel act of Nourse declared 1M7 will flee, a transition "definitely from a ne.ll- market to a buyers' market." UlchiMil In History On the other Mile of the picture: Urat.-, hit u hundred pounds, MKheKt 111 history, ut Chicago yen- t'Tdny and n meat packing official t amrriiTited thiit. coiisiimani doom willing tf> jmv JilKli for pnrk. broke; to M In Now York brcuuM1 of fcuni by wliiirnlinlilerii Hint etwt of llvliik' hikes may loud to new 'WJIKIJ ttemuncbi inul pro- House for Party Ballot Loses Vote St. Paul The party designation bill putting county offi- cers and legislators under party.lftbels lost lix the house Tuesday toi mentioned immediate but unofficial suspicions that the Soviet union might be trying to bargain for ex- tended Influence In East Asia. Some Japanese, the dispatches said, saw In Russian references to American sacrifices In capturing the Elands an attempt to Insure that former Japanese Industrial equip- ment taken from Manchuria would not be Included In the total repara- tions assessment against Japan, The 'Russians already have cited their "sacrifices" in the Manchurlan campaign. V.N. to Consider 1'lan Inclination on by n throe-vote margin but a sponsor said It woultt be revived within two days on a motion to reconsider. Tho measure required votes for passage but wont down on a 03-63 tally after an amendment Louis Douglas Named New U. S. Envoy to Britain Wiuihlndon Lewis V. DoiiKlas, oniitlmo budget director, today was appointed byv President Truman to bo ambassador to Groat Britain. The nomination WIIH sent to the emite Tor coiiNldrrutlon. DouKlafi taken the poat to which O. Mnx Gardner, former governor of North Carolina, was bound wlu-n ho The Kromlln'ii gesture at Itn face value. Senator Wlloy a mem- ber of the foreign relations com- mittee told reporters: "I think Rus- iSla's approval is -a good omen for exempting county officers from Its future collaboration between the provisions had boon voted down, i two greatest nations of tho world. 71-52, After the roll call, will mean the brushing aside of flentiitlvo Vernon Welch. misunderstand- Ils, switched vote from aye to'i The United States proposal to ad- organized by the deputies but 1 were to be reported to Moscow. Agree on Report Feodor T. Gousev. Soviet deputy, Ionricd Senfttor Vandenben? (R.- prcsldtog officer of the Sen- ate, and Speaker Martin of the House: "It is my belief that this sug- gested legislation accomplishes the desired unification of the services and I heartily recommend its enact- ment by the The draft, entitled "National Se- curity Act of was completed by Clark M. Clifford, the President's special counsel, after lengthy con- sultations with the secretaries of war and and the Joint chiefs of staffs, all of whom, Mr. Truman said, approved the bill. Plan Air Department Under the measure, the TJnltcd States air force under the department; of the air 'orce to which would be tranisfcrred ;he army air forcoa, the nlr corps of disagreements in the form of mar- ginal notes or annexes. The negotiations finally agreed to report In this language: "The deputies failed to work out procedure for consultations with Allied governments." This was the principal disagree- ment which encumbered' tho depu- ties since they started work Janu- ary 14 under of the foreign ministers to cut away as much underbrush as possible by February .36, The western, the most part', wanted IB 'smaller Allied na- tions to have 'a full voice in com- mitteu work In writing the Ger- man treaty but Russia wanted to them only limited partici- pation at the most. The views of 13 of these small nations wore hcndcd by the deputies during their six weeks of meeting. on Pilot for Austria More progress was made on th Austrian treaty. A rough draft wiu Lieutenant nobble Joe Cavnar, 22, Okmulgce, Okla., who landed a giant C-54 plane on the Polar ice cap to rescue 11 marooned lllers, grins after his arrival at Westovcr Field, Mass., by plane from Greenland. (A.P. Wire- photo.) nay to effect the lutcr reconsider- ation. The balloting followed an after- noon of debate which split, liberal and conservative Jlncti wide climaxed by nn appeal for the bill' from Majority Leader Roy E. Dunn who declared "na It Js now, we do not undertake tho responsibility for any party Representative Robert Shoran, Munkato, a loading spokesman minister as a "strategic area" the contains many blank spaces and islands which the League of of which the two tlons had mandated to Japan ufterinialn ones were: World War I was due to come before! Yugoslavia's claim for tho United Nations security counciljsquaro mllort of Auntrlan Carinthta midduiily In Nutv York Just the bill, although hu voted with the conservative majority on Mnjnr Oem-rul rhllljj II. Kli-iiilnic, tulmliil.Mnilor nf (he Office ofljj T'-injwiniiT C'mtlroJji. wild Jitimii1 may ronr to MO eelllJi u lirilciiw ('unf.'ri-.Vi rrstorr-i JI fl.OOO.OO') from Of'A npc-iulltit; e.-illniiili'ii. lie MI It I the OJ'A would be im- iible to curry em riitlonInK dud enforcement, of rirlcu n-lllni.'n vlltiout the firming ndclcd thai Hie Mime wnulcl b" true n-lit control and Unit reiiln might rlnn nn nveruk''- of per nifiiitli per A Sennit- banking subcommittee recommended end of rent i-nrit.-cil.i Deeemljrr .'II and n ton per rent Inert-use In ceilings now. foro sailing. Now pi-cuildent of Ihe Mutual Life Tnsurimcc Company, Ninv York, formerly nnrvitd in tho us u roprosentatlve from lid In it DmnomiL und iinrv- ed briefly nti director of the budget Hie Into .y'rmilclln D. Booxe- voll Look office In iOM. HK quit this In difference of opinion on policies. Tim new l.o St. wui born ut IJI.-iboo, July 2, IHO'I, A iiotdli-i- In the First World war, DtiiiKliis was once clte.il by Goncriil John J. Pcrshlng. flu received the Crolx do Guerre. New Blizzard house organization, declared "hi> saw little responsibility being (Conllnuetl on Fnga Z, Column 2) 2 Girls Survive Snow Avalanche supported by Rusiiln. and opposed by the other three powers. 2. Definition of "German assets In Austria bo distributed as reparations, Tho western nations wanted tho .definition to rule out former Austrian property .seized by the .Germans, but Russians Iluneook, Mich. A pair oflnought u looser dellnlUon. Wallace Establishes New York Residency New Henry A. Wul- London A groat new bliz- lucf, former vice-president and t-he most severe In years, rttary of eomrni-rci-. wild today In a worsened the British- fuel crisis to- Jormnl statement that he has been "ny. Isolating hundreds of villages resident of New York since lust January 1. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona und lair tonlRht and Thursday except snow flurries during the nlKht. Not much change In temper- auire. Low tonlttht lil to 20. Minnesota: Generally fair to- night and Thursday. Lltt.li! change in U'j.voriKln: cloudy tonight und Thursday with oren.ilonal very llKtit snow flurries. No Important change In temperature. J.CH'Al. WKATJIKfl OfTlciiil obscrviitlons for the 21 hours ending at 12 rn. toclny: Maximum, minimum. 10; noon, and shutting down scores of Indus- tries, The storm was centered In north- ern England and Wales; tumbling Third Dead in Bleacher Crash Lafayette, num fir killed In Purdtlti university blonclior collapse during the Pur duo-Wisconsin basketball gnm gume Monday night rose to thre today with the death of Thoodor Norcknilst, 25, of Gary. Nordqulst wa.f a senior and fie1 on 03 missions while an army ul force pilot in the' last world wa He suffered chest Injuries, a frac tured spine and a fractured righ leg. Eyota Student's Leg Fractured Eyota, Wayn Dolder, 20, son of Dr. P. C. Dolder Syoto, and son-in-law of Mr. anc Mrs. Leslie Isensee, Chatfleld, wa one of tho. injured persons in th helt piling up to 15 Inches of snow on that which had fallen be- fore. Highways and railways to th coiil mines were blocked. Russian Leader Drops Supreme Soviet Post London Because of the "pressure of work connected with ils main the Moscow radio says, Colonel General Andrei Alek- siinclrovltch Zhdanov, often mcn- .loned as a possible successor to frlinci Minister Stalin, hns been re- ic-ved of his post, as chairman of .he council of the union of the Su- of .snow: sun sets tonight at sun rlsc-.i tomorrow at IXSKWHEllK Anpclcs Piiul New Orleun.s New Yorl: ___ Mux. 31 71 or> 5-t 11 711 -10 Mill. 23 53 12 30 53 .17 2-1 Pet. The, council of the union is the smaller of the two houses of Rus- sia's Parliament, Rockefeller Gift to Be Exempt From Taxation Tru- Tjman signed today a bill freeing from .01! approximately1 in gilt tuxes John D. Rockefeller, Jr.'s do- nation of an New York city -site 'for the United Nations headquarters. verslty, Lafayette, Ind., Monday evening. Dolder, who Is an engineering student at the university, has a compound fracture of his left leg and is in a Lafayette hospital. Hla father left by train Tuesday morn- Ing to see him. Notification of the injury came to Mrs. Cordon Strange, Chatfleld :ii a telephone call from her sister Mrs. Dolder, in Lafayette, Mrs. Dol- dcr told Mrs. Strange tnat Dolder was under the bleachers, seating fans, when they crashed. Dolder is an army veteran. Fairmont Voters Approve Bonds New Airport Fairmont Issuance of in bonds for a municipal airport 'here was approved by voters at a special election Tuesday, to (160. The project will cost with the federal and state govern- ments making up the balance. 10-year-old (flrls, Beverly Marshal) and Carol Roberts, woro burled Monday under a, small avalanche of (mow near hum, but apparently fered no serious Injuries, Tho children, fell 40 fool: when a jlcdge of snow overhaiidlng u hill j collapsed while they walked along It. Two boy summoned members of tho Qulncy and Hancock! fire departments, and offi- cers and n county road crow Joined in rescue efforts. Rescuers quickly extricated Vov- erly, whose foot were sticking through the snow, but Carol was pinned fuco down by more than six feet of snow and Ice. After the of- ficers dug her out, she was taken to a hospital for observation. Crew Abandons Sinking Tanker Now tanker Roy- al Oak, gross tons, was re- ported sinking in the Pacific 30 miles from Talara, Peru, this after- noon und her crew of 40 abandoned hip, the operators, Bemuth, Lem- jcke Company, announced here. Warren Austin Named to U.N. Arms Commission President Tru- man today nominated Warren R. Austin, United Status delegate to tho United Nations, as this country's representative on the tr.N. commis- sion for conventional armaments. Brood Sows Sold for Apiece Fairmont. Minn. MaLI, PON Ivlo; Sherburn farmer, reported to duy that he .sold his brood sows fo slaughter purposes and that the brought a head. Posivio explained that at the pros ent price of hogs, he felt he was money ahead by selling the animals Hog prices, ranging up to hundredweight on some livestock markets, were contrasted with the accepted bid of a head for a ;eam of horses sold at a farm auc- ;lon here several days The horses were purchased two. years ago for apiece. Second Superfort Missing On Alaskan Training Trip Elmendorf Field, Alaska The second Alaskan air command B-20 lost in less than a week on missions was feared down oday somewhere on or near the laska peninsula, possibly In the Iclnlty of the Valley of Ten Thou- and Smokes. Brigadier General Joseph H. At- missine as-of that hour. General Atkinson said. Normally, a plane on "a training mission carries approximately 12 men. The Superfortress from Ladd Field, Falrbanlcs, which was forced down in northern Greenland last Friday, had 11 men aboard. Improved flying weather was hoped for today to aid In the search Inson, commanding general, an-'of the rugged. little-Inhabited area, ounced the last report from' Alaska air search agencies were isslne ship placed it near Bruin alerted. ass, on the mainland area of the north of Kodiak island. The heroic rescue two days ago of the Ladd Field fliers in northern he number of men aboard, and'Greenland after their ifiir names were not disclosed. range reconnaissance The pass is also about 100 miles utheast of Naknek. flshins corn- unity on the arm of Bristol bay, ear the famed Mount Katmal area. The plane's gas supply should ave been exhausted at about rn. yesterday and it was declared .he United States army, nnd general icadqunrlcrrt nil- force (air force combat The President would appoint, ect Senate confirmation, n. chl of stuff of the nlr force for iv tcr of four years. The functions of U commanding general of the air fore combat command, the chief of tl air corps, the commanding gcncr of the army air forces would I transferred to this chief of staff. The legislation sets up within tl national defense establishment tl Joint chiefs of staff, to be made u of tho chief of staff of the Unite States army, tho chief of naval ot erations, the chief of staff of it. United Stuto.s nlr forces, nnd th 'chief of staff to the commander i chief "If there be This Joint command would act principal military advisor .to Ui president and secretary of naUonu. defense, preparing strategic plan ind providing for strategic dlrcctlo: of l.hc military lorcos. 3 Boys Drown In Passaic River N. who helplessly watched three young- tors drown In the Ice-choked Pas- ulc river credited the boys today vilh showing gallantry to the lout "Don't come any one boy was said to have called to men 01 the "human chain" that sought fu- tilcly to rescue them yesterday "The ice is cracking. We're going under. You'll go too." After one boy had slipped beneath the frigid waters, spectators lining the banks saw another trying to hold up his remaining companion, a Negro boy. Weakening, the white boy lost his hold and both disap- peared. 1st Outbreak Of Mount Etna Since 1928 Two Villages in Path of Flowing Lava Threatened were report- ed fleeing today before n now or lava pouring from the cra- ter of Mount Etna after the Sicilian volcano's first notable eruption since 1928, when It destroyed the village of Mascatl. Tlic eruption which begun yes- terday reached proportions the se- riousness of which could not be ully oscc-rtuinrd at once because or ilouds of smoke obscuring lon. Dispatches from Cntania, how- ver, said that after 20 hours of eruption lava had covered an arcn, of about a mile and a half on front or about 165 yards. The erup- llon was stiJl continuing. A Catania dispatch to the newspaper Rlsorglmenlo said that flashes of name were first observed nt noon Monday on the north slope of Mount Etna, midway between Mount Cncciatore and Mount Tlm- parossa. Lava began flowing yesterday Into the plain of Palombc and then con- tinuing ovvr the hill, threatening the villages of Passo Plsclaro and Randazxo to the north- west of Etna. I-ava Fillinr Valley In Its flow toward Passo Piscta.ro. Uic lava met an obstruction which diverted It Into the Musumcci val- ley, which It was reported, to ba slowly filling, reaching at some joints ft depth of more than 6M. feet. Scientists who rushed to the scene those stationed at the Etna, ob- servatory station said the eruption night succeed in filling the entire 'alley In the course of the day If .he flow should continue at Its prea- jcnt rate. Mount Etna Is on the east coast of SlcJJy about J8 miles' northwest ot Catania. Slightly over'-10.000 feet in height, it is the tallest vol- 25-Pound Sugar lation for First 9 Months of '47 Washington The govern- ment today guaranteed 25 pounds of sugar for household users ,_ ._ _..______ the first nine months of 1947 and Cano in Europe and thVhlghest pitat" an OPA official snid It Is n. "safe jn southern Italy. Its base the year's individual allow- nbout scjuarc miles. Bodies of Theodore Hunter, ten, the Negro boy, and John Kowal, Jr., ten, were recovered a few hours after the accident yesterday. Search was resumed today for the Jdy of the third boy. Police said he Richard Kowal, nine, a cousin of John, Tomah Man Held for Trial on Bank Charge Madison, Wis. Lloyd D. Robertson, 25. Tomah, WIs., waived preliminary hearing when arraigned >efore a U. S. court commissioner on a charge of robbing Die Loganvllle, WJs.. bnnk Monday nd was bound over to federal court or trial March 10. Bond was set t A lone robber held up tho Lo- branch of the Farmers Merchants bank of Reodsburg and scaped with Robertson JO.S taken into custody at Madison ic same night. ance will be 35 more than lost ycnr. In a joint statement, the culture department and the OIDce. of Temporary Controls: 1. Reiterated that, a new st.ain) good for ten pounds will be validate on April 2. 2. Announced another ten pound will be validated on July 3. 3. Announced Increases in secon quarter sugar rations for bakers soft, drink bottlers, candy makers preserve manufacturers, and othc Industrial users, and for hotels, res taurants and eating places. Household users already been allocated live pounds of suga for during the ]lrst threo mouth, of this year. Methodists Name E. G. Richardson Wisconsin Bishop win. Bishop Krn- 
                            

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