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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 25, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER Know flurrlfftf tlihiir coldfir Full Leaaed Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OKOLSKY Read New Column Dally on Editorial VOLUME 47. NO. 7 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 25, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Russia 0. U. S. Plan for Pacific Islands 11 Who Cheated Death Near Pole Return to U. S. A Croup Of of n B-29 crash In the Arctic smile from the rear of nn army ambulance after.their arrival at Wcstover Meld, Mass.. from Greenland this morning. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Re- publican-Herald.) By Charles Mercer WestoTer Field, Eleven American airmen who cheated death for three dnya 600 miles from the North pole after their B-28 crashed in northern Greenland were flown back here todar. Lieutenant Bobble Joe Cavnar, 22. of OkmulRee, Okla.. set down the rescue big C-54 trans- the army air transport command fit a. m. (C.S.T.) here after a nonstop flight from Thulc, Greenland. Less than 24 hours earlier, Lieu- tenant Cavnnr wiiRcrcd his life that a sheet of Ice beside the crashed B-28 would hold his 20-ton four- enttined won. The 11 men climbed stiffly from the rescue plane. Thoy appeared exhausted from their ordeal. An ..-my medical officer said none was In serious condition. Lieutenant Vern Arnett of River- side. Calif., pilot of the downed B-29. only crewman to discuss the belly-landing and rescue before all hospitalized for rest and ob- servation, described Lieutenant Cavnar's landing as a "wonderful job." On Routine Flight Permitted to talk to newsmen for five minutes. Arnett said his ship was "on n routine training flight. We were not making photos. The big plane ran into ft storm which blew It completely off course, hp related and added: "We were running short of fuel and Mnce we had been flying for J5 hours, there wu.i nothing to do but make a bolly landing, 7 Seized in Black Market Sugar Raids Illegal Stamps Reported Sold by Gang Chicago Seven persons have been arrested here on federal warrants charging participation In a "gigantic Midwest black market" operation which U. S. District At- torney J. Albert Woll said netted an estimated from counter- feiting and theft of sugar ration stamps. The men were seized after gov- ernment agents worked six weeks to link Isolated arrests in Chicago, Detroit, Columbus and Milwaukee. "These men are members of a small group that seriously impeded the sugar rationing Ray- mond L. McClory, chief of the criminal division of the U. S. at- landed on a lake and luck- ily. no one wax hurt. "We made regular contact four tiftrr we cru.thcd. We stayed on the plunn nncl hud plenty of food." I.Irutrnant Cnvnnr mild hl.i plane u nrvcn-miin crew left Wc.it- ovrr field nt n, m. (C.S.T.) Sunday and rlcw to Sondrestrom Yard. Greenland, where emergency supplies were picked up. The merit continued to Thule. "We found the aircraft without difficulty. The men hud built a Tire with oil from the engine and when they saw us they got so ex- cited they tossed n Itfc-rrift on the lire." He wild the C-S4 cruised the area "dragged" the lake where the crashed plunc rested twice before he nald. Young Man Blows Self to Bits in Telephone Booth Washing-ton A yount war veteran who wept sa he drank final beer, then entered a. downtown restaurant tele- phone booth and presumably touched off a plait thftt blew him into cove police blxarre to unravel today. Through m draft curd and prints front right band, police Identified the victim ai Fred- erick Joseph Sauen, 35, Wllbei- Barre, Fa. Thirty In the taurant at 407 Ninth itreet, N. W., escaped serious Injury In the'explosion which wrecked the phone booth. Witnesses said the yount man carried a paper lack into the booth with hint and police after finding1 two dry cell bat- teries theorized It contained a home-made bomb, pogaibly man- ufactured out of blattlnr pow- der. torney's office said at their ar- raignment late yesterday. Woll said'most of the sugar ration stamps allegedly sold by the gang were, counterfeited In scattered sections of the Midwest and responsible for diverting an estimated pounds or sugar into Illegal channels. Those arrested on charge of pos- sessing counterfeit sugar stamps were Yancey Bridge worth, 46; Col- vin Roberts, 30; Auda "Abe" Mil- ler, 47: Arthur Jackson, 26; James "Big Jim" Winters, 32; Robert "The Baily, 30, and Alphonso Amablla, 28, all of Chicago. Bridge- worth, Roberts, Miller and Jack- son pleaded innocent yesterday, and their cases were continued. Winters, Bally and Amabila were held for arraignment today. Between 30 and 50 additional persons are expected to be named In Indictments by a federal grand Jury which has been investigating the situation. White House Denies Report of Attempt on Truman's Life White House labeled "completely groundless" today report at- tributed to Radio Luxembourg that an attempt had been made on President Truman's life. Eben Ayers, assistant presi- dential press secretary, made this statement to newsmen. He added that there was not the slightest basis for such a broad- cast. Mr. Truman was In his office when Ayers was asked about the report which, a Paris newspaper attributed to'. Radio Luxembourg-. Relief From U. S. Limited to Five Countries Woshlnrton-OTVUnder Secretary of State Will Clayton indicated strongly today that the the administration asks for relie will be expended; in only five Euro pcan countries and China. At n landing, "It was nort of "The B-20 crew lined up on cnch xldn of a landing area a nlrlp (Continued on Voice 3, Column 7) AICMV FLIKICS Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Snow flur- ries and slightly colder tonight: low 18 to 20, Wednesday partly cloudy with occasional snow Hurries in the forenoon: high 26 to 28. Minnesota Cloudy with occa- sional light snow flurries tonight and Wednesday. A little colder in extreme north tonight. with occasion- al llRht snow flurries tonight and Wednesday. Little change in tem- perature. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for Lhc 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 27: minimum, 22; noon, 27: precipitation, trace of snow: sun seta tonight at SMS; sun rises tomorrow at EXTENDED FORECAST Minnesota, Wisconsin Temper- atures will average about live de- grees below normal, little colder Wednesday, little change Thurs- day, warmer Prlctny, colder Sfttur- diiy. littln change Sunday, precipi- tation will average lc.su than one- tenth Inch, occurring as scattered Bevin Charges Truman Wrecked Palestine Talks Secretary Ernest Bevin charged today that President Truman wrecked negoti- ations for a peaceful settlement of ;hc Palestine problem, by calling for Immediate admission of Jews to tho Holy Land during the tr. 3. congressional election cam- palffn last fall. Opening a House of Commons de- bate on the Holy Land question, Bevin "declared there was still a chance of settling It outside the United Nations. Bcvln sold he was engaged In crucial negotiations with Jews and Arabs last October. "At that he said, "things looked more hopeful and there was a don't think I over- estimate I had the right approach at last, but whaf hap- pened? "I went back to tho Paris pcaoo conference and tho next think It was Atonement dap or one special day of tho Jewish the prime minister telephoned me tit midnight and told me the Presi- dent of the United States was go- Ing to Issue another, statement." 178 Killed In Japanese Train Wreck By Tom Lambert Komagawa, Japan least 178 Japanese were reported killed and 350 Injured when four cars of a six-car train Jumped the track here and plunged down a 30-foot embankment 25 miles wesl of Tokyo. It was one of the worst railway disasters in Japan's1 history. Unofficial reports said the coup- ling between the second and third cars gave way as the steam train rounded a downhill curve. The engineer did not know until ho reached the next station, on the branch line that he had lost port of his train. Four small wooden cars which had carried 200 persons each were strewn in bloodstained, splintered wreckage for 200 yards. A few yards from the wreckage, the bodies of Testifying before the House for eign affairs committee, he said tha these European countries "appea to have need of outside assistance- Austria, Greece, Hungary, Italy and Poland." Significant, by their omission wort both Yugoslavia and White Russia which have been large recipients o UNRRA relief, UNRRA's operations In Europe will begin winding up March 31 and President Truman has askec that Congress vote for direct relief from the United States Half of What b Needed Clayton estimated for the com- mittee that will provide 57 per cent of the "minimum" re- lief requirements of the six coun- tries. The United States furnished 72 per cent of UNRRA finances. He asserted that to stop the flow of relief when UNRRA folds "would be disastrous." Clayton emphasized that the ad- and when It gets the actual not allocate at once the total amount any one country would get. Legislation Introduced, by Chair- man Eaton (R.-N. .would set up Trusteeship Proposal Held Entirely Fair Crisis in Korea Slated for Airing at Moscow Parley Washington Secretary ol State Marshall said- today Russia ias advised the United States thai the Soviet government feels an Am- erican trusteeship over the Jap- anese-mandated islands In the clflc would be "entirely lair." Marshall told a news conference that the Soviet note, said Russia took; into account that the islands were won chiefly by American arm- ed forces which bore "incomparably greater sacrifices" than others In the Pacific advance. Only Russia, Marshall said, has concurred. In the American trustee- ship proposal, which was submitted to the United Notions last week. Incident Closed Marshall told reporters also that: 1. He considers the incident over Under Secretary Dean Acheson's Senate testimony that Russia's for- eign policy was "aggressive and ex- panding" is closed. He does no intend to reply, he said, to a seconc Russian protest. 2. Romania has assured the Unit- ed States It will comply fully with President Truman's stipulation that American food in famine stricken Muldavla be distributed without discrimination. Marshall noted that he American Red Cross Is paying for food diverted from U. S. army shipments for hunger elief. 3. The United-'States, Marshall aid In a statement, has expressed lopo that India will accept the clear-cut challenge" of 'Britain's Two Killed in Collapse of Bleachers at Purdue Game a direct relief organization to be independence plans and "proceed to reak the impasse, between the (In- ian) Congress and the Moslem eague." 4. The American delegation- to he "Big Pour" conference at Mos- ow has been completed with the dditlon of John Poster Dulles, Re- ublican foreign policy advisor. The elegation will number 84, about half of whom are clerks and stenog- administered solely by the United Mr. Marshall said he plans States os a successor to the expir to leave, March 5 for Moscow. He ing United Nations Relief and Re habitation administration. men, women and children lay in a small field. The majority of those killed were on route into the country to buy food. Most of tho dead had canvas bags or large scarf-like handker- chiefs in which Japanese carry their food. The committee also has before 1 another Baton bill to carry out Mr Truman's request yesterday for au thprity to permit the Unitec States to participate In the inter national refugee organization. Its establishment was recom mended recently by the United Nations economic and social council Byrdandl97 Men Leave Little America .By Alton L. Blakeslee Aboard the U. S. Mt. Olympui, February 24 The Vlt. Olympus flirted with a huge Iceberg today, making a sharp turn to avoid the great mountain of ice which loomed suddenly out of the Caster Saves Man in Surf Carroel, Williams today credited the casting: skill of a fellow fisherman with saving his life in tho treacherous surf offoPoint Lobes, Williams slipped from the rocks while surf fishing and was carried 100 yards out. H. E. Robertson rush- ed to the furthest point out and made a perfect 250-foot Ing the light lino directly across Williams' struggling body. Then, carefully "playing" Williams with his light tackle. Robertson worked tho man back to safety. Williams suffered only superficial cuts. fog. The headquarters ship encount- ered the Iceberg while steaming to- wards the ice pack, but quick ac- tion kept the vessel at a safe dis- tance from it. Ship's officers said that radar had missed spotting the fog-shrouded giant during a brief Interval when the radar controls were being switched. The Mt. Olympus at present Is scouting the northern edge of the pack, going westward after finding the ice belt still about 120 miles south of'Scott's island. Roar Admiral Richard E. Byre and his 197 men evacuated Little America at p. m. Sunday aboard the' ice breaker Burton Island which was racing against a con- gealing pack for the open sea, A (dispatch received from the Burton Island Monday night said Byrd left the Stars and Stripes flying -over Little America and tacked 'a note on his own metal hut: 'This has been a peaceful place. It better than to be van- dalized. said Mr. Dulles was added after con- sultation with Chairman Vanden- berg (R.-Mlch.) of the Senate for- eign relations committee. 5. Efforts are being made to re- move technical difficulties in the transfer of surplus goods to China and to arrange for transfer of ships as authorized by Congress. on Korea Korea jumped several notches higher today on the list of Soviet- American difficulties confronting Secretary Marshall in his prepara- tion for the Moscow conference. Lieutenant General John R, Hodge, commander of American forces in Korea, said last night he has given up trying to negotiate with Russia for unification of the country under a provisional govern- ment. "I have done all I can over there and have come back for discussions at higher Hodge told a news conference after a visit with Presi- dent Truman. "What further is done Is up to lomeone higher up." Smashed Bleachers In Purdue university fleldhouse a few minutes after a new section collapsed, kill- ing: two students and Injuring 200, are shown here. A body lies covered in the foreground. (AJP. Wire- photo to The Republican-Herald.) Lafayette, Ind. A section. of new wooden bleachers In the Purdue university flcJdhouse, Jam- med with fans in the crowd of at the Purdue-Wisconsin basketball game, collapsed last night, killing: two students and to- juringr about 200 persons. The crash of splintering timber as the 62 rows of the 100-foot Ions structure sagged and crashed to the dirt floor brought an ominous silence over the cheering, howling fans. Dr. Frederick L. Hovde, Purdue president, reported to Governor Ralph P. Gates that 142 of the injured remained in hospitals this Pork Chops and Bacon To Go to a Pound By William Ferris Chicago A pork 'chop soon may cost a, pound at re tail butcher shops as a result of the sharp advance In prices ro live hogs In recent weeks, an Agriculture department meat spe cialist said today. "Dollar bacon" also was seen as a possibility as pork-on-the The general declined to say whether he has suggested that Mar- hall tackle the problem at the Big Continued on Fa.gc 4, Column 4) RUSSIA Milwaukee Man Killed in Fall Agairut Car GOODBYES said by 'Secretary Milwaukee Daniel P. O'- of State George C. Marshall and Rcllly, 56, was injured fatally last Crown Prince Amir Saud of Sau- night when he slipped from the Icy dl Arabia as tho Arabian visitor shoulder of highway 100 and fell concludes his -tour of the nation in Washing-ton. mobile, the sheriff's department re- ported. Minnesota Cities Get Safet y Plaques St. plaques for outstanding traffic safety pro- motion in 1046 were won by Albert Lea, Rochester, Chisholm, Two Har- bors and Minneapolis, the Minne- sota Safety council reported today. Honorable mention certificates were won by New trim, Ely, Worth- Ington, Sauk Centre, Wadcna, White Bear, Lake, Park Rapids and Olm- The awards will be presented by Governor Luther Youngdahl at a dinner to be held in the St. (Paul hotel May 7. Subcommittee Agrees on New Rent Bill Senate bank IK subcommittee today approved bill authorizing a ten per cent in crease in present ceilings on rent. The bill would end federal rei controls next December 31 and re move the administration of contro from the Office of Price Admin Istrntion. The controls 'would be vested 1 the couvts except where the state chose to establish their own en forcement. Senator Buck (R.-DcU, chairman of tile subcommittee, told reporter the bill would be ready to lay be fore the full committee In about week. He said the five-man group split three to two, on many pro visions. Buck outlined these provisions of the legislation: 3. Permission lt> Increase rents ten pe cent, over the ceilings or lunt December 31 2. decontrol of new housing and ac commodatlonji which wnro .not rented be 1047. February 1, 1040 And January 31 3. Lift on alt Hotel nccommodn tlonfl Including trailer campN. 4. Remove on rentit abovo month nfur iionllciUlon of thn Ion per cent Incroann. Huetc thin provliilon, pooisln who can Stassen Plans to Visit Paris Next E. Stassen on a fact-finding tour of Europe, to- day met Henri Llberat, Belgian min- ister of economic affairs, P. DC Jroote, minister or re-equipment and Auguste de Schryver. a former minister. who is now leader of the opposition. Stassen planned to leave Brussels tonight for Paris, lleht snow Frldny. TEMPEKATURKS KLSKWIIEKE Mux. Mln. Pet. ChlcnKO 31 25 .01 Los 110 51 Mtnmi 70 15 Mills. St.. Paul 21 .01 New Orli'imr. fil 112 New York 20 25 Sfiittlc 51 rift Washington ..-----34 20 80 Pigs Escape When Truck Tips MadJuon, of Nakoma. an exclusive suburban residential area. Joined employes of n Madison slaughterhouse today in a pig hunt in their gardens, yards, terraces and ravines, A truck en route to the slaughter- house overturned in the suburb and JO pips scattered in every direction "ate last night. By noon about 50 had been roundrd up, thanks to tho coopera- tive efforts of the residents and tho Body of Rochester Woman Found In Reservoir -Near Los Angeles workers, arge. The rent remained at Los jail- ed n 31-year-old electrician today on suspicion of murder while they investigated his story that a girl ho met in a bar January 0 mny hove been the "Black At the same time, murder Was virtually eliminated in tho third feminine death mystery locally In six Phillip E, Smallcy, 31, ot Knox- vlllc, Tcnn., arrested last Saturday hi San Francisco, was returned here last night and Detective Lieutenant William Cumlngs said Smalley was being held pending a further check. Officers hove tried futllely to find some trace of Miss Short's move- ments after a friend left her at B downtown hotel the morning of January 9. Sheriff's deputies, probing the finding of a woman's body in a reservoir, buttered about the face and clad only in a sweater, Indicated that she probably died a natural death and that her injuries were inflicted during a 'week or more in the water. They identified her as Mary V. Muldoon, 38, Los Angeles stenogra- pher, who had been reported missing by James Muldoon. bowling alley employe. Lieutenant P. L. Button said Hhe was the former Mary Vivian O'Laughlin .of Rochester, Minn., widow of Roy Gilmorc Vanawoort, a dental technician who died In a fire in 1942. I ford to ptiy that amount, "need no ft. Allow ronsonnbJy Increased rent ani'ucmcnc iH'twneii landlord und icnani for cerium Improvements. 0. To eonllmio rent control but. vlt-hout tho help of OPA. cndlnit federal aaporvl' slon next December J, 7. Leave enforcement, to courU, lttlnff the tcrmnt to go Into any courl with hlu Krlovunce. Recovery would be fixed at or triple damaffcn, which- ever was greater. 8. Allow the stall's to apply to a fed- eral aKcncy not yet deRlKncitrtd to over controls, 9. Tmnsfnr of rent records and flleft to the Department of Commerce, -whcrn they would be made accessible to the courts, tenants or landlords. 10. Make tho bill ntrcctlvc the first day of tho first month after 1U adoption, 11. Exempt the. District of Columbli from the provisions of tlic bill. This are Has Us own rent control law. 12. To require continuance of present ncrvlceB for which tho tenunt wits pny Inn last December 31. Six Cars of Train Derailed St. Paul Six cars of a It- car Great Northern Oriental Limit- ed passenger train were derailed at Mead, Wash., near Spokane at p. m. P.C.T.) Monday, the public relations office of the road n St. Paul said and reports were ,hat no one was injured. The train left the Twin Cities ast Sunday morning. and tender of baggage car, dormitory cur for the dining car rcw, two coaches and two tourist Icepors were derailed but the cars lid not overturn, the vond said. Two of the derailed cars wore cashed'onto the east, bound tracks, ut service was quickly restored, he Great Northern said. hoof soared to all time record in the nation's markets. Live hog sold yesterday at a top of liundred pounds at Chicago. Hogs hit another new all-tim peak of on the Chicago markc today. Cains of 75 cents to wcr reported, as Rood and choice weighing 180 to 260 pounds .sold a to The top of paid for several loads of choice hof? averaging about 200 to 230 pounds. At the same time, future dc liveries of grain except March whea soared to new peaks for the curren upswing, with September wheat nd vancing as much ns 571 cents ove the previous close. Hog prices in Iowa Interior mar- kets advanced about today lo i lew top of Russ Jeter, wholesale mnrkc' analyst for the Agriculture depart- ment, said that prices of pork In wholesale markets were being marked up in line with the live log advances. He snid these Jn- reases should reach consumers atcr this week. "Some retail shops may translate wholesale prices into pork at a Continued on Pngre 3, Column 3) PORK The rear trucks ,he locomotive, a DESPITE winter weather outside, so hot have become the hearings on the appointment of David Lilicn- thnl to the Atomic Energy Commis- sion chairmanship, that witness Robert Barker takes off his coat. Barker, former head investigator for the On-American Committee, consults the flics of a Communist organ ns he Icstlfles before the Sen- ate Atomic Energy Committee in morning- and that eight were as seriously but not critically in- jured. Most seriously Injured was Theo- dore Edwin NordQUist, a resident and veternn of 63 as an nrniy air force pilot. Parents Informed Dr. Hovde informed Governor atcs thnt telegrams had been sent to parents of nil .students injured n the Governor Gntos recommended mmcdlale investigation by rcpre- cnttitlvcs of Uic state government, Uie legislature, now in nnmcd two of its members to partl- Ipnie in tho inquiry. The governor Mild In a special e-wtiiKc to li-HUOuturc that Dr. lovdc believed the crash, wiut uu.sc'd "by a structural failure" or he materials in tlic bleachers. leldhousc was locked last night rtcr it wns cleared and President Sovdc named a faculty committee o make an investigation. There was no panic. The hun- rcds of the occupants of tho Icachcrs, some of whom had turn- led as far as 30 feet, limped or rawlcd through the crowd to seek cdlcal attention. Many or those i the blenchcr .scats had been Banding and cheering for the Pur- uc tcnm o-s It was leaving the oor at. half time with a 3-1 to 33 nd over the Wisconsin Badgers, conference leaders. The splintering or huso Mipport- g Ijcnnin gave out sharp crncklnir olscs and within a xpacc of minutes the entire structure (Continued on Page 4, Column 3) BLKACUERS Four Children Killed in Toledo Car-Truck Crash Toledo, children, were killed instantly and another was near death as the result of a truck-automobile crash ten miles cast, of here today. The dead arc: Jerry Anderson, eight; Sandra Wllley, six: Daniel Dunn. ten. and Charles Olcott. 16. James Nelhauxmeyflr, 12. is near death in St. Vincent's hospital. State highway patrolmen said tlic children were en route to Toledo to attend n. private school. Claire Dunn, driver of the car. was la a serious condition. MacArthur Asks Early Peace Pact With Tokyo General MocArthur -old a group of congressmen today that it formal peace should be slcned quickly with Japan, which he said cnn become a more thorough democ- 'ixcy than Germany. Representative Norrls Poulson one or the congressmen visiting here with Secrrtary of In- .crlor KruR, reported that MacAr- Llmr said dulny in concluding; the jeiico hniidlcnppcct dc- apmt'ill, "lid luid l.hr potential danger of making tho nation too tlc- >cndcnt on the United States.   

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