Winona Republican Herald, February 21, 1947

Winona Republican Herald

February 21, 1947

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Issue date: Friday, February 21, 1947

Pages available: 14 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Winona Republican Herald

Publication name: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Pages available: 38,914

Years available: 1947 - 1954

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 21, 1947, Winona, Minnesota W EITHER rlnilitr. iinl tljfht Full Leased Wire Report of The Atsociated Member of the Audit Bureau of F OLLOW Steve Canyon BACK TAUE VOLUME 47. NO. 4 WINONA. MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 21. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Truman Asks for Foreign Relief Attlee Demands Britain Increase Coal Production to Be Released From Army to Mines H.v William rhlllljM I.nmlon The Labor purly covermnent K'liird ttiduy u whilr (m per '.'iilli'd "u working pat lern for the tiullnn." U told tho wrixry llrltntui they must Incrciun production or rli.k Uvi' "romidntlotu of our imtloiml life." Tlir white paper Important ofllrliil IxHllcc tlin Thr nnllo'i nccd.i awl, produc- tion, foreign currency. Thr prlrntp ImllvUluiil con- tinue foreno hopen o; ...hnrter liriiirn. ItKfrfii'ir lil.'i liullvldiin In mine, mill, fue.tor.v. litlMir mu.ft nbiuulon "liidiintrlnl nrninKi-rniMtl'i which ro- prucluctloii, prlcr.i or Mow KxjiorlH A.ihed Industry niu.'it export one-fourth Its and iierept u iiterri (lyii trm of priority allotments of man- power und The wur-ntrulneil nation, eurrent- ly caught In tho plricerit eif un un- prrrrdentctl fuel und rkme-drawn financial plight, wnn warned In n miberly worried white paper that "Uil.i Ls u rrltlcui mo- ment our natlonivl nrfalr.i." Without dnvmiitlc.'i, Prlmn Mlnls- trr Attlro told the people thnt cle.H- pcrutely needed eoiil was priority! number one for 1D-W nnd mom work- rrs priority number two. Reflecting crippling effects of thn winter's Industrial crisis, tho white paper net tho export goal for ,-it 140 per cent of prewar in comparison with tho no per cent government Krltaln nreds for normal standard of liv- ing. The report onld tho long-time goal remained 175 per ce.nt. Citrs Nreil for Coiil To get more- coal, the report said tho governmont would exempt mln- rrs from jnllltary .icrvlco for live years: would recruit as.OOO new miners: provide more homoa for miners: r.crk to the production god! from 259 tons per man in 1040 to the 308 tons per man mined in the peak year of 1837: nnd institute R nation-wide fuel rationing sys- tem. To increase tho labor force, the government declared It would take nearly SOO.OOO men from tho armed forces, bring In foreign workers, sock to attract housewives to the factories and hold veteran laborer in their Jobs beyond normal retire nrnt npc. Warning that food rationing wl rontmuo for years unlesn export nrf Increased sharply, tho whit paper estimated that Britain wl Washington Gift Yields to U.S. College Vu. One liinidrod and forty-eight yearn nftnr liln ilnudi, Qtiorgo I UK ton Ntlll piiyN about II ynnr (oivnrcl tho (tiielun lee ot HtudGiit lit Wn.thlnKton lliilvrrnlly. 'J'hnt'N the iinnutil yield per fitniliint, thn nnhool announcril toiluy, ii f u Rift made by the first rroNlilont In 170C to the tiny. Hlruia-lliiK "Hctuxil In tho Upper wliloh Inter WII.M iiiiinod uflcr him, At the. time, tiiriii'd over to the Holionl munn .vntl.flOO tvnrth of NnoiirltleH In a on nn I firm. It WUN the flrat liirKo girt of NcoiirltlM muclc to un Ainnrlcnn It liiw yielded more thun House Votes Against Repeal Df Lien Law St. Tho by n oto of Thuwlay uphold the mjorlty nctlon-of Its public welfare ommltton in rcfuning to conaldor bill which would repeal the lien provlnlon of Minnesota's old ngn as- iilstfinco laws. When tho majority report won re- turned, Representative Thomas O'Mullcy, Duluth, author of tho re- peal measure, moved to substitute tho minority committee report which fuvorcd his Public Hearing Set on Slot Machine Bill St. Paul The antliilot ma- chine lefflNlntlon advocated by. Governor Luther Youncdahl will bo riven public hemtiag next Thursday morning, Chair- man Walter Koffosheske, Sank lUpldi, of the house general ler- Jslatioo committee, said Thnti- day. he forced to draw from the American iuid Canadian thl.i year to pay for Referring to ltd dollar position the government stild that the Amorl ran loan obligation requiring Jlrllsiln to begin converting froxirn ntcrllng balances this yenr "might result In .some of und u fjiirnt Increa-teil drnln on tho Unltecl ytiiten and Ciiniidlun cretlltfl. Committee O.K.'s Bill to Outlaw Portal Pay Claims Washington Tile Itou.'ie Jucilciarj' committee approved today tt mea.suro outlawing virtually nil port.-U-to-portiil pay clulmti. The bill would also lea employ- ers advance, as n .'as only for liberated countries. Jnltcd States relief activities In oc- uplcd countries, such as Germany nd Austria, nrc flnnnced by Var department from its appro- rlations. (White House aides said lonner resident Herbert Hoover has not et reported to Mr. Truman on his ivcstlgnUon looking to long-term Inns for rehabilitation or occu- led areas.) Complaint's In Congress There have1 been complaints In Congress about UXRRA's admlnla- tration methods. Some legislators contend Its services have been used to support governments uncoopera- tive with the United States. The President made no reference to this, but recommended that lu- turo United States relief assistance Vett Bill Signed Washington President Truman today signed legislation continuing for World War U veterans the right to reinstate their government icsarance pol- icies. The reinstatement period un- der previous law expired two nco. The legislation authorizes Veterans administration to tue Its discretion in determining how ton? a. time former service- men may have to put lapsed pol- icies back in force. be given directly rather than through an. international organiza- .lon, and "be administered under United States control." Mr. Truman, said the money isks is designed, "for the urgent rc- lef needs for the balance of tha pear." He added: "The most critical period will be n the spring nnd su-inncr months, when. UNRRA shipments will cease ;rado process. Not in the plant at the time, he was reported in col- apse at his home last night. Most of the victims of. the city's worst blast since the Los Angeles Times' dynamiting killed 20 men n 1910 were Jn the plant or ad- jacent heavily damaged buildings, I although a tcn-yenr-old Negro rid- Head of Columbians Sentenced in Georgia Atlanta Columbian Presi- dent Emory Burke was sentenced ;oday to three years imprisonment for usurping police powers in di- rection of his Negro-hating, Jew- bating organization. Superior (circuit) iarl Crow -Imposed ice floes, one lour his bicycle several blocks away Jong by a half-mile wide, Incrcos- under a plummeting piece of ingly menaced North sea shipping metal. .as a new blizzard, sweeping in from I the cast, lashed England's south const. English channel shipping con- ditions were the worst of the winter. Court Judge the sentence after a .jury returned guilty ver- dicts lost night on three counts of an indictment. The court ordered Burke to serve 12 months on each of he three counts, the sentences to un consecutively. Truman Withdraws Sommer Nomination Tru- man today withdrew the nomina- on of Frank W. Sommer to be S. marshal for. Minnesota. There was no immediate cxplana- on. Four Houses Wrecked Pour houses were almost complete wrecks, windows were broken in 300 within a mile's radius, glass British fuel ministry officials ex-1 shattered as far distant as 70 pressed alarm at the probable the entire downtown dis- of the new snow and protracted cold on coal movement and gas supplies. Householders in many areas found It impossible to buy coal or wood. ,nd their harvests are not yet avaJl- ble. "Swift legislative action is neces- ary if our help Is not to come too a'tc." Some Nations on Feet While the aid was asked for "lib- rated" countries suffering Irons the ravages of Mr, Truman did ot mention any specific nations. The President said that in some berated countries, "XJNRRA u-111 avc achieved its objective fully" hen UNRRA's supply operations case. He explained that means hey will be again "self supporting; so far as the basic essentials of life are concerned." But in other liberated countries, Mr. Truman said this is not yet the case and .whnt remains to be done, while relatively small and limited. In time and scope, is "none-the-less vitally important." To leave the task unfinished, he said, would be to "replace hope with. despair in the hearts of these peo- ples and thus to undermine the spir- itual and economic stability Upon which our hopes for a better world must rest." Mr. Truman said he thought the relief contribution should be used only Jor providing such basic essen- tials as medical supplies, food, and items which wjlj aid in the pro- duction of foodstuffs. Courts-Martial Changes Asked Wanliinjrton Members of the House armed services'. Two Men Killed in Crossing Crash Racine, men were killed yesterday when their car collided with the North Western road's 400 at a cross- ing just south of the city limits. The dead were identified as Floyd A. Miller, 41, Racine route three, and Gcno Rcnnzulli, 22, Racine. Miller was the father of six children. Rcnnzulli was not married. The 400 was held up more than an hour because of dam- ages to tho locomotive. trict was jolted as if by earthquake, sending terrorized citizens to tele- phones, quickly ja7nming police and newspaper lines. Twelve fire companies battled the resultant blaze and a dozen spot fires started by flaming debris in the neighborhood. A towering cloud of smoke, which {many witnesses likened-to that in ncwsreels of the Bikini atom bomb I blast, musliroomcd up, hung .over the area for minutes. Thousands of curious thronged into the area, hamperinc fire and rescue operations and doing some looting, but were fin.illy cleared out by emergency police squads. A graphic description came from jDcwnyne Bearss, 22, of South Gate, a salesman, who with his father, j (Continued on Pace .1, Column 6) today promised speedy action on. army proposals for changing the ar- ticles of war to meet criticism that military justice is loaded against enlisted men. Secretary Patterson said the War department favors amendments which would a> Legalize appoint- ment of G.I.'s to serve on courw- jnartial. now the prerogative of of- ficers only; (2) End the mandatory sentence of death or life imprison- ment for rape, and (31 Protect courts-martial from outside pressure. LOS ANGELES f Senate Bill Asks Amendment Vote on Sales Tax St. bill proposing constitutional amendment calling 'or a retail sales tax of from one to three per cent, tied in with pay- ment of n soldiers bonus and aboli- tion of personal property ad valorem taxes, was introduced In the senate today. ;