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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: February 3, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 3, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER Cold tfmtjftit. low irrn to flvo below; Tuendny fair rrj F Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OLLOW Steve Canyon On BACK PACE VOLUME 46. NO. 295 W1NONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING. FEBRUARY 3, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Extension of War Powers Asked YoungdahFs Housing Bills Ready Commission to Speed Home Building Asked St. Paul Governor Luther Youngdohl today proposed to the Minnesota legislature a houslnK pro- gram Including R state commission to speed homo building and author- ity for public development of blight- ed arras where private Industry can not mret the need. Two bills embodying the gover- nor's recommendations were ready for Introduction in both houses to- day. The housing commlsr.lon bill pro- vides for a council of live, appoint- ed by the governor to servo without pay. and n paid director. It would operate with an advisory board rep- resenting various groups Interested in the development of suitable hous- ing. Tho comml.wloner would neck to Increase materials available for home building In thin arm nncl keep home buildcri) posted on now con- struction developments. It would cooperate with private and public Hgcnelcs Interested In housing in forging a united effort. Under terms of the housing ant redevelopment bill, the second of the governor's meiusurcs, municipali- ties and counties would be author- lied to: 1. Rehabilitate and redevelop blighted relylnjf an far nil pomible by encouragement of private HOUJO sponsors wcro Representa- tives Charles W. Root, Minneapolis: Judson D. Plllton. St. Paul; Walter RogosheskC, Saute Rapids, John A. Admiral Mitscher Dead at Norfolk Norfolk, Va. Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, commander In chief ol the Atlantic fleet, died at the Norfolk naval station hos- pital early itoday of coronary thrombosis. Tho wartime boss of famed Task Force" 58 which played havoc with the dled.ln his sleep at a. m. .-He was ad- mitted to the hospital after suffering a heart attack on his GOth birthday last Sunday. In Washington, Secretary of Forrcstal expressed regret ov Mltschcr's death. Ilartle, Owatonna, and Harold R, Lundeen, Minneapolis. In the sen- the bills will bo sponsored by Senators Donald O. Wright and Gerald Mullln, Minneapolis; and B. G. Novak, St. Paul. By far tho more complex of the two bills, tho housing nnd redevel- opment authority covou some 60 typewritten pages double upaccd. Its Admiral Mnro A. Mltwher features arc: i. It U enabling net, per- and not mandatory In character. Z. It for no expenditure of funds. 3. The qucxtlon of whether a, municipality wishes to take ad- vantage of Its would be (Object to a referendum. The people could hold nn rlectlon, on flllnc petition with tho re- quired number of unil mnke thrlr own ilcclxlon. Thn bill provides for setting up a "housing and redevelopment author- ity" in communities where a study has Indicated the need. Ten per- cent of the voters In the bllghtec area must request 1C by petition, and the whole question of tho authority submitted to n referendum. The housing nnd rcdeveiopment authority would consist of five com- appointed by the mayor of the municipality, with approval (Continued on Page 10. Column 7) YOUNGDAllIi Price War on Cigarettes in Wisconsin Hit Madison. 1V1.1. receiver! by tho Complaints state department of agriculture that cigarettes wore bring retailed in Wisconsin wholesale prices brought n remind from that office today that th state's unfair sales act makes unlawful to offer for sale any Itei of merchandise at less than cost. Anthony Madler. dcpnrtmen counsel, said complaints told price wars involving cigarettes. The state law requires retailer to add a markup ol six per ccn to their costs and wholesalers two per cent markup. "Tho purpose of tho law Is t prevent cutting of Madle .said, adding that "If prlco cuttin is permitted to continue It coul lend to an open prlco war on man; types ot merchandise and couli prove ruinous to small Faribault Man Perishes in Fire Farlbault. Minn. Henry Harshaw. about 70. was burned to death Saturday night when fire MKrpt his home, where he Ilvec alone. The Are was discovered by Ted Swclsthdahl. who saw tho flames leaping from the lie was unable to reach Harshaw. Dr. A. W. Nuetzman, nice county coroner, said that tho fire apparent- ly war. caused by un overheated coal utove. Bad Weather in Midwest Forces Butter Price Hike New York Tho wholesale price of top grade butter shot up 4.5 cents a pound today on the New York Mercantile exchange with the Increase blamed1 largely on short supplies due to bad weather In the Midwest. Today's closing price of cents a pound brought the wholesale fi- gure above tho retail price charged by some chain stores in tho East, and an upward shift in retail prices appeared probable. The wholesale jump was the big- gest since December. In tho Chicago wholesale market most grades of butter advanced 4 VI to cents a pound. Only the poorest grade remained unchanged. Butter grading 03 score sold at 08 cents a pound, highest since Janu- ary 10. i Cold weather and storms In tho Mldwe.it, expected to reduce ship- ments, wcro partly responsible for the advance, dealers said. They add- ed that there has been a better consumer demand lately in view of retail price reductions. Missing: in Double-Header Theft Aberdeen, S. D. Search continued here today for loot In the second halt of a "double- header" theft. State's Attorney Vcmon Williams said a written statement was made Philip aulcllcc, 01, a Janitor, that he took last in a money bag kept lor chc'ck-cushlng Iund.H ut un Aberdeen bar. Ctuldlce in.tl.sicd. however, ho left the money ban and all tho money In tlir washroom, the statt'w at- torney ,suW. A total or waa re- covered In tho wtwh room. i Steel Firm Breaks Off Negotiations Because of Strike Pittsburgh The Jones Laughlln Steel Corporation an- nounced today It broke off contract negotiations with the C.I.O. United Steelworfcers because of a strike Idling employes at tho com- pany's Allqulppa. Pa., plant. Bruce Smith to Undergo Farlbault, Minn. Bruce Smith, former University of Min- nesota All-America football player and more recently a member of the Green Bay Packers team, said today ho would undergo a scries of X rays and treatments at the Mayo clinic groin Injury that troubled him during football season last year. He was used mostly in a defensive role last year because of the injury. "The place he -occupies in th hearts of those who served und him, officers and men, are a .firm cr basis of tribute than any tha words could Forrestal sal Tho United States navy, wit sorrow and pride, sends its dee sympathy to Mrs. Marc A. Mi Mitscher entered the hasplta last week for what a fleet spokes man said would be a "complete nn horough checkup." On January 2 the fleet spokesman described th admiral's condition as "very good. Had Bad Heart On Friday, Captain L. E. Mueller iurgcon of tho Atlantic fleet, do icrlbed Mitscher's condition as no .serious and said that Captain Cec Andrews; a heart specialist at th naval hospital at Bethcsda, Md came to Norfolk for consultation and concurred Jn the diagnosis o the admiral's ailment as a hear attack. Mitscher, soft-spoken but a hard hitting, determined lighting man had a personal hand in many spec tacular and 'important action: against the enemy in the Pacific and his admirers claimed that put tempo of the war against Japan into high gear with his Task Force 58's first carrier blows at Truk and the Marianas In February of 1944. In those attacks the navy tested its newly-built carrier power for the first time against strong Jap- anese strongholds and exploded the myth, of. their Invincibility. Mitcher's swift marauding tost Torcc had the entire Pacific ocean :o the gates of Japan as its stomp- ng ground, and his carrier planes smashed vital enemy aircraft plants and chased tho Japanese air force to cover while pounding .at Tokyo and vicinity early in 1045. Skipper of Hornet He was tho skipper of the aircraft :arrier Hornet, the "Shangri-La" rom which Lieutenant Colonel Later Lieutenant General) .James Doollttle launched his Mitchell jombers for'the raid on Tokyo and our other Japanese cities April 18, 042. From April 1 to July 25, 1043, the period when army, navy and U. S. Labor Law Changes Suggested Smaller Businesses Would Be Exempt From Federal Rule By Max Hall Washington Representative Landis said today that thousands of small businesses should be taken out from under federal labor laws. Landis said he will push this idea when the Houes labor committee starts.hearings Wednesday on vari- ous labor bills. Tho House judiciary committee, meanwhile, began its study of the jortal-to-portnl pay problem today jy calling for testimony from the United States .Chamber of Com- merce on legislation designed to out- aw the Sood of back pay suits: Landis, second ranking Repub- Ican on the House labor committee, .vlll be the first witness before tha body on Wednesday. What he proposes is to limit the meaning of interstate commerce. Changes Asked In an interview Landis said no company should be considered a ngagcd In interstate commerce un- ess its "productive effort" is In two ir more distinguished !rom Its scales or purchases. Ho aid this would put thousands of under federal laws the exclusive "Jurisdiction o: Fire Damages Top Floor of Cook Hotel at Rochester Rochester, swept through the top Door of the four-story Cook hotel early today, forcing the hotel's, 90 guests to flee to safety. No one was injured. One guest who had suffered tho amputation of a, leg was carried from Ills room by firemen. The blaze broke out in a room on the fourth floor of the brick building which is located at Broadway and Second street southwest in tho heart of downtown Rochester. Firemen said there was no panic among- the as they marched from the building. The lire was discovered about a. m. Chief damage, firemen said, wax on the fourth floor although the rest of the building was water- soaked. The First National bank and three small shops on the main floor were damaged by smoke and water. The hotel, built'in 1SG3, was the center of Roch- ester life for many years before the turn of the century. The war had held up plans to raze the structure. ;he states. This suggestion, If followed by Congress, would: 1.. Increase the importance of tate governments in .the labor- management fluid, (most state legls- .tures now are considering labor ills, just as Congress 2. Deprive many workers of the rotection of federal laws like the Vaguer labor relations act and the hour act. !'Thc National Labor Relations oard takes In. too much aid Landis, 'Let the state governments pass ieir own 'Little. Wagner acts' if hey want to. The states ought to ava more jurisdiction over their orkers." Include Elevator Boys He said that even elevator boys In ew York city now are considered Intel-state commerce, because rms with offices in their buildings Congress to Vote on Limiting President's Tenure to Two Terms By William F. Arbogast Washington Finally organized after a full month which only one bill was sent to President Truman, the 80th Con gress geared, itself today to the business of lawmaktag. "Growing pains" resulting from the congressional reorganiza tlon act or last year contribute largely to the slower-than-usua start of the legislative machinery But with the realignment noi complete two major measures ma come up for consideration In th Senate and House during the latte part of this week: 1. Republican leaden Americans Due to Leave Peiping Soon day fo Americans in Pelplng is draw ing near, with Chinese Communls and government forces lighting along the route they must take tc the sea. The departure date of the U. S iruce headquarters personnel anc iheir wives and children is expected to be announced within 24 a'part of the general American with- drawal from China. Unless a truce should end the lighting alone the 115-mile route to iie coast, they will have to leave by air which would bean abandoning much equipment In Peiping, or run the gantlet on the. Pelptng-Ttentsln railway under tJ." S.: marine' guard Track Torn Up The American staff of the now defunct peace-seeking headquarters here were informed that Chi- nese Communist guerrillas were at- ackine along the railroad yesterday. The Chinese government Bald it was till able to use the line. Govern- ment sources said the Communists proposed, a part of a ne.r the rlght- '20 miles southeast of Pelplng. Sections of the track were torn up 11 introduced, last month, that in JSSSSJp by Communists Thursday. The ROV- oyer-employe iclatlons (except the m-nh rimmed control mid made marine filers won air supremacy labor the term "com- rcnahsFridaV Communists cut the ro" sh l n rcpalis iriaay. communiits cut tne the south Pacific, Mitscher "wasjmcrce" should npply only to; commander of the aircraft in thei A. Private firms that are inter, Solomon islands. (state in their "productive He became a vice-admiral March that is, located physically in mon 21, 1344. than one state. Born January 26, 1887, at Hills- B. Companies subject to federa license on regulation, such as elec- boro. Admiral Mitscher at- tcnded school in Washington, D. C., trie power flrms. and was appointed to the Naval Landis' measure also seeks to pre- aeadcmy from Oklahoma In 1006. After tours of duty on various war- ships, he went to tho naval air sta- tion at Pensacola, in 1015, for! flight training, became the 32nd pilot to receive his wings there and made naval aviation his career. vent industry-wide strikes by pro- viding means for government seiz ure and other steps. Father and Son Confess Slaying Bismarck, N. Alvus and Roy V. Curtis, father and son, Sun- day confessed to the murder nt Mo- hall, last August, of Alvln L, Mad- dox. M. B. Rhodes, agent In charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation office at St. Paul, In Bismarck to address a service club today, said he had been Informed of the confcs- ilons In B. long-distance call Irom: ils office. Watch St. Paul Parade St. Paul An estimated crowd of watched a two- hour parade marking official open- ing of St. Paul's annual winter carnival. The spectators shivered in zero weather as 110 units and more than 50 bonds nnd bugle corps marched by. Sunday persons braved win- try blasts to witness an Ice fishing contest at White Bear lake. James Ijabore of the town of White Bear Lake won first place with his six- pound, two-ounce northern pike. route again and the hopeful that the House will to a vote on legislation limit- Ing- the tenure of any President to two terms. 2. Senate pilots arc planning a quick showdown on the House-passed bill retaining- war- time excise tax rates indefinite- ly on liquor, furs, cosmetics and other so-called luxuries as well as such things as travel tickets and telephone service. Neither branch has considered the aresidentlal limitation measure, but :he Republican high command has scheduled it for a. House vote Thurs- day. It proposes' that the question of putting' n. limit on White House occupancy be decided by the states in the form of a" constitutional amendment. Thirty-six states would have to ratify it before it could be- ome law. Passage of tho excise tax bill Is Irtually certain once the Senate :ets around to a vote. The House pprovcd the measure overwhelm- ingly last week. It also passed the first veterans' egislatlon of tho 80th 111 continuing for World War U eterans the right to reinstate their overnmcnt life insurance polices. That right expired lost Saturday be- ause the Senate had not acted. It be so during the to add a retro- day. Railways south and north of Pei- ping also were sporadically attack- ed by Communists presumably in an effort-to isolate the city. Defense Inspected Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek meanwhile was reported in Hsuchow Inspecting defenses 01 that Klangsu province city 185 miles northwest of Nanking. Threat- ened by the Communists, it shelters government arsenals, air bases and railways. In Shantung province, northeast of Klangsu, government news dis- patches reported Cliiang's armies closing in on the Communists' new Fourth army hea'dquarters at Llni- with the remarkable General Ho Peng-chu, who recently swapped sides for the fourth time, spearhead- ng. the attack. The commander of the U. S. Sev- enth fleet at Tsingtao, Admiral Charles M. Gooke, Jr., was confer- Ing at Nanking with TT. S. Ambas- ador J. Lelghton Stuart over plans or the American withdrawal, but neither would comment. expected to j activity The only bill passed by both the not recall the ease. Funeral Services Held for Killed by Dogs ,.P. IVIrrpholo to The RepuMlean-HerAld Virginia, Funeral services were held today for Glen Howard Brace, five, (above) who was bitten and mauled 'to death by six dogs Friday. Burial was In Green- wood cemetery. Supreme Court Jrged to Recall Jortal Pay Case Washington Valter (D.-Pa.) Representative declared today mt the Supreme court "ought to ecall" the cose on which portol-to- ortal pay 'suits have been based "lay down a clear cut yord- ick" to follow in the issue. The speakinp: to a, Truman Seeks Authority to Ration Sugar Presses Congress for 'Immediate and Favorable' Action Washington. President Truman today asked Congress Tor "limited" extension of the second war powers act. Includ- ing his authority to ration sugar and allocate scarce foods and a handful of materials. Though he named only a few Items, he left a big field, for j White House discretion ty seek- ing the power to restrict other ma- terials in case of "a national emer- gency that we do not now foresee" as a coal strike. Pleading for "immediate and fa- vorable" action on Capitol hill, Mr. Truman asked n. one-year extension beyond March 31 for three sections of the act. The major one. Title m, carries the sweeping power of priority and allocation and or ex- port and import control. Under it, Mr. Truman asked con- tinued authority over these Items: FOODS Grain, rice, and related products; export and import control only over fats and oils; import controls only over meat, dairy meat prod- ucts, peas and beans, canned fish and protein foods. EXPORTED MATERIALS Rubber, tin, antimony, cincho- na bark and alkaloids manila and agave fiber. V. S. biles and tractors (quota lim- its on freight cars; the drug streptomycin. Mr. Truman did not ask exten- sion of inventory control, the gov- ernment's wartime weapon against hoarding and a reconversion weapon ngalnst the "withholding" of goods from market. The two other of the act which should be retained, said Mr. Truman's message, are those which (1) Allow the maritime commission to run shipping lines and  1, and John O'Brien, alias Arthur Bulls, 35, of Chicago, also ex-con- victs. An inquest was to be held today; n an effort to ascertain whether! Dolan. shot Bliss, then himself rather than surrender to police. Dr Jerry Kearns, coroner's physician, aid his examination showed pow- ler burns around the wound in Solan's head, but none on the head wound of Bliss. One detective who estimated the ntended loot at about aid it may have included operat- ng funds of racing -book operators, long with late Saturday cash rc- elpts of many South Side mcr- hants. The safecrackers were surprised t their work by the policemen who tipped off by a janitor In the uilding. Policeman Arthur Olson of Chicago, who discovered the robbers as they tried to blow the safe, and who was wounded in the chin when one of the bandits Urcd through the window, takes flimsy refuge be- hind parked car. FEDERAL FORECASTS WJnona and vicinity: Cold wave tonight, occasional snow squalls and strong northwesterly winds: low zero to five below. Tuesday, fair and very cold: high 15. Minnesota Cold wave with, blizzard conditions this afternoon and tonight. Blowing and drifting snow gradually diminishing tonight. Fair and very cold Tuesday and Tuesday night. Low temperature by Tuesday morning ranging from 25 below north to ten to 15 below south portion. Wisconsin Cold wave with snow squalls and strong northwest winds tliis afternoon and tonight. Temperature falling to ten to 15 below north and five to ten below- south portions by Tuesday momins. Blowing and drifting snow slowly diminishing tonight. Clearing and quite cold Tuesday and Tuesday night. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 36; minimum, 12; noon. 12; precipitation, .2 of an inch of snow; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at For the 24 hours ending at 12 m. Sunday: Maximum, 30; minimum. -8; noon, 20: precipitation, trace of snow. TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Cliicngo so 24 Denver so as Los Angeles 77 M Miami 74 tin Minneapolis. St. Paul 20 New Orleans 52 New York .............32 Edmonton 15 41   

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