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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 30, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 30, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER nK and fi I.U tonKhlt fulr and 014. Full Leatcd Wire News Report of The Ascociated Press F OLLOW Steve Canyon Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations On HACK PAGE VOLUME 46. NO. 292 W1NONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING. JANUARY 30, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Winter's Worst Blizzard Snarls Traffic Travel Near Standstill In Midwest Fire Raged at Rosemount During Blizzard By The AftHOclntad Southern Minnesota today chokod by the second heavy fivll in two days with train, bus and auto travel halted by heavy piled up by wlndji ranging up to M miles nn hour. Closing of schools was irmeral Jn the nroft. At the helghth of the btaard today n large section of the ftdminlstrntlon building at the Oopher ordnance works near ROBO- snount was destroyed .by lire that threatened several other structures nwirby. TJireo companies of St. Paul flro- men Joined tho Roscmount depart- ment In fighting tho flames which broke out shortly before midnight A nrpwrvll which hwtocl sprend of the flames was credited with saving hnlf of the bis building. A hospital housing polio patients from Twin Cities hospitals Js near the administration building, but a strong which hampered fire- men, blew smoko and flames away 'rod the Infirmary. Boy Killed by Car In Minneapolis a boy, Gerald, nine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Isaacs, was killed last night when police said he was struck by a car driven by Kobert Walters, 21, as the boy crossed the street In front of his home. Jn Milwaukee, where tho roof of a. factory caved In under tho weight of the snow and several downtown store windows wcro broken, hotels were reported jammed last night, Five Dead, 14 Hurt In Arkansas Tornado Afjitntnotli Ark. Violent tornadlc winds killed a lca.it five persona and Injured 14 others in a destructive sweep through north-central Arkansas and southern Missouri lost night. Hardest hit was Salem, Ark.-, 20 miles northeast of here. Six persons wcro Injured, one seriously, and 0 homes woro destroyed. Seven ad- ditional houses woro damaged. Tho tornado moved northward rom Salam, ripping through tho mull communities of Montler and futton valley In southern Mis- ourl. Four, persons, all members of Communication lines were dis- rupted but reports reaching here from Salem and surrounding areas indicated the property damage would run Into the thousands of dollars. The dead at Montler were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Williams and their m and seven-year-old daughter. Republican-Herald photo XYMCAL STORM SCENES EN WINONA. These were typical storm scenes in the Winona area today as about 16 taches of snow, plus a high wind, slowed movement and services down. The third componet of a blizzard, cold, is to arrive tonight. When toe 16 Inches fell ;on Third street here It buried, everything, Including County Attorney Kenneth W. Nlssen's car What did he do about it? He had the choice of shoveling (center picture) or having the reluctant vehicle towed. His decision was the same as the motorist who owned the car shown ajt the rigpht. He called tow truck. na family, were killed, at Montler way -patrol reported "several per- nd Mrs. Charles Ittiwson died near Thayer amidst tho fallen debris of her home. Her husband, who sought to save her, suffered in- juries. Several Injured Montgomery, 'Montgomery. tornado struck the northern edge of Mont- gomery today, and the- state high- sons" injured. The Btorm missed the army post, a telephone operator at Ounter said, passing "just on the edge of us." Truman Kills OPA Rent Increase Order Wa.nhington A short-lived OPA order that -would have boosted rent sellings ten per cent was chalked off by i? high offi- cial today as slmpjya government affency "mix-up." President Truman scotched the order the minute 'It "came to the attention of the White this official-told a reporter, U.S. to Wait Developments In China Crisis By John M. Hlf Mower Washington Any positiv new American policy toward Chin appears certain today to be delayec until and streetcars and buses in the City ouiciaiH nere c expected to stop runnlns If themselves here can see what th storm continued. Motorists Warned The snowstorm covered storing unity to their own divided nation. about re badl nols. eastern Nebraska and south Ambassador John Stuart t Nanking has the authority to d (whatever he can to aid tho Com Sou th "on e-n dec of the wlnt-v attack thn munlsts and tho Chiang Kai-shek nor h-Pvcrnraent to come terms, bu no has to walt ac out of the Twin thcmsoJvcs osk hlm to tho Chinese reported numuiK Into. that States is NORTHWEST Many i.long tl.r southern following a negative policy now that boundary of tho Mate wcro with- American-sponsored peace machl- ou: mail service "urv ln China has been, scrapped by The state highway department. Secretary of State Marshall. Bather which warned motorists against nt- tno Policy is described as a more tempting travel southward, reported or lcss Passive "wait blocked ronds in the southeast scc attitude baaed on hope. This hope is twofold: (Contlnurd on Pace 3, Column 1) PJrsti that tne communists and Nationalists will not come to a final showdown struggle In an all-out civil war and second, that in the Interest of China itself they will make some moves toward unity on _ their own'Initiative, Tho ABrtcul- Tho United States Is continuing turc department, announced lust meanwhile, to hold available a nisht it will rxpnntl buying Exnort-Import bank fund operations to help remove price dc- trom which the Chinese may bor- prr.wtng surpluses from the market row ror economically sound proj- The department is required by cot3 lr nnd when conditions in China !nw to support producers' prices nt Improve, riot les.n than 00 per cent of parity. Officials also predict that the or n national averace of about 3fi American government will "not ig- cents a dozen during tho February- norc China" in making relief funds U. S. to Buy More Eggs adding: "It seems to be quite definite there will be no across-the-board Increase at this The official, who would not per- mit use of his name, said the order went from Major General Phlll B, Fleming's office of temporar; controls to OPA during Fleming absence from the city. But Just how it happened Is "stl something, of a the of ficlal said. He explained, however, that a order relaxing rent controls t benefit Individual landlord "hard ship" cases was being drawn u and that the ten per cent Increas plan apparently got into the plctur as a possible alternative. At the end of the confusing chain of events the -situation was this President Truman still hopes the government can hold the line on rent controls, but is leaving the decision to Congress. Before tho White House handed out this announcement Into yester- uy, there was a rapid-fire sequence: 1. Scnlitor Pulbrlght a member of the Senate banking ommittec, told a reporter he un- erstood OPA was ready to an- ounce the Increase. 2. OPA's public relations branch dvlscd newsmen a rent celling rder would be forthcoming soon. 3. Something over an hour later OPA called off Its announcement. 4. Press Secretary Charles O. Ross summoned White House cor- respondents to his office and told them tho President, advised of the reported Increase, declared that he had not authorized It. Senate Bonus Bill May Be Offered Soon Legion and V.F.W. Plans to Be Given Committee St. Paul Taking the lead from the house in seeking settlement of the state soldiers' bonus pro- posal, the senate soldiers home and soldiers welfare committee late Wednesday said it would Introduce a measure next week as a commit- tee bill calling for such payments. The decision was announced fol- lowing a hearing of represcnta- blves of the American Legion and She Veterans of Foreign Wars. The former suggested payments of monthly for domestic service and for those who saw overseas serv- ice, with a limit of estimated to cost a total of The V.F.W. plan followed like lines but would be unlimited and cover the period from February, 1941, when Inductions began to December 31, 1946. The total cost was esti- mated at more than double the Legion" proposal. In neither in- stances did the veterans groups suggest how the money should be raised. Committee members took the po sitlon their job was to draw up the machinery for payment and leave the money-raising for later deter- mination" by the senate finance ant taxation committees. Senator James 'Carley, Plainvlew (Continued on Face 10, Column 6) BONUS April period. available to various countries to Officials sold a price of 33 cents carry on some of the work which in the Midwest, where most of the UNRRA formerly did. CKS processing plants nrc located, Officials hero stress that there should maintain national average wns nothing "punitive" in Marshall's price of about 30 cents. Tacoma Foorinj? Mill Burns With Loss of Tacoma, Wash. Plre swept through the Centennial Flouring Mill plant on Tacoma's waterfront today and firemen the building probably would bp n total action yesterday In ending Ameri- [can participation In tho Commu- ntst-NatlonaUst-Amerlcan executive headquarters. low. Flrrmrn snlcl they believe no lives Wrrc lost. The bliur.e broke out early today and a brisk wind fanned tho flames. Two Bemidji Men Hurt in Air Crash Dcmldjl Clem Ingersoll, pi- lot, and Lawrence Wehsus, both of BemldJl and about 25, were seri- ously Injured late Wednesday when Bcltraml County Sheriff John Ca- hlll said their rented light plane crashed while they were "buzzing" friends at a Turtle lake resort, la miles north of here. Blanchard, Davis and Poole Want to Play Pro Football Washington Three of the army's football stars have applied for furloughs so they can play pro- fessional football next fall. Disclosing this today, the War de- partment said the applications of Felix Blanchard, Glenn Davis and Barney Poole are under considera- tion. Davis and Blanchard both have been named all-American' backs. Compromise Urged in Pdrtal Pay Cases United States government, intervening in the Mt. Clemens Pottery Company case, urged today that portal pay time spent by labor be balanced against periods of time that employes de- vote to personal pursuit during working hours. Gunman Killed In Winona But Mississippi Not Minnesota Jackson, a Mississippi sheriff mid a high- way patrolman fatally wounded a gunman at Winona Tuciday night, they put an end to a wave of safe robberies In the South and Midwest, Mrs; Roberta Keller, self-identified widow of the slain man, told State Safety Commissioner C. R. (Red) Brad- ley here. The woman, who identified the man as Alfred Llnh Deggcl- ler, 27, of Columbus, Ohio, was quoted by the commissioner last night.as saying that "for_sev- eral years off and on and her husband have been makluff safe robberies In South Dakota, Missouri, Mississippi and other She was quoted by the com- missioner as saying that she and her husband usually were ac- companied by her two children, Patricia, six, and Roberta, .four, who were with' them at the tlmn of the shooting: at Winona. Tho two children are being kept in n children's home here. The -woman Is being held in Hinds county Jail. r Also held are two men identi- fied by Montgomery County Sheriff Shed Castle as Cecil Tusinr, 18, of Albla, Iowa, and Henry Glenn Walte, 18, of Mi- lan, 111. the sheriff said they were with the Deggellers at the time of the Winona shooting. Bradley quoted the woman an faying that at times she and her husband operated a carnival concession. Boys, 10 and If, Admit Putting Wire on Track Walton, Ind. Wat- ton. boys, ten and 11 years old. awaited possible federal., prose- cution today .after Sheriff Har- old. Smith said they 'admitted In signed statements they put a. roll of fence wire on tho Pennsylvania track here Mon- day, which derailed a passenger train and killed four persons. CMS County Prosecutor Keith Campbell said he would confer with U. S. Attorney Alex Camp- bell to determine whether federal charge would be filed. The sheriff said signed, state- ments were made today by Jack Sprinkle, ten, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Sprinkle, and Lysle Graves, 11. Forty-five persons were In- jured as the locomotive and five can piled up. A stolen lipstick was the clue that "broke" the ease, the sher- iff said. Smith said the Sprinkle hoy was questioned about the theft after he had been seen writlnr on a bam with lipstick. Knutson, Engel Near Blows Over Tax Cut Proposal Washington Difference over taxes flared into an angry ex change of bitter words and near Hows In the House cafeteria toda between Representative Knutson (R.-MInn.) and Engel (R.-Mlch.) At one point Engel grabbet Knutson's arm but colleagues salt no blows were struck, although'the verbal punches flew thick and fast Knutson is the main House cham- pion of per cent cut In indi- vidual Income taxes. On the House floor yesterday South Dakotan Demands End to Appeasing Russ By William F. Arbopast Mundt (R.-S. demand- ing an end to "erne-way reciprocity" in Soviet-American rela- tions, raised, the threat today of congressional action if other means fail. While voicing confidence that Secretary of State Marshall will seek to remedy tho situation which Mundt sold, permitted Russia to publish details of American In- dustrial construction, the lawmaker ,old a reporter: "Congress may have to step in If something Isn't done soon." He Isn't sura Just what Congress an go, Mundt added, but he Is tudylng tho subject. "Tho constitution pretty wcJJ loflnes the authority of the execu- Ive branch ot government In andllngr such matters, and I'm not ure whether it Is within the power r Congress to he declar- d. "Perhaps the most we could do would be to adopt a resolution urg- ng that definite action be taken." Raps Appeasing Policy Mundt blamed What he called tho administration's policy, of ap- casing Russia" for the ability of ovlet visitors here to obtain data or a Russian language book titled American Construction., Mundt aid It was published last year by w Amtorg Trading Corporation, an official branch of the' Russian overnment." "We have never insisted that Rus- sia accord to us the same privilege we grant to the South Engel declared this would help the poor very, little, while giving large benefits to persons with high in- comes. He said that If the G.O.P.- domlnated Congress makes such a cut it might "spell defeat" for the Republican party In 1948. When the two met in the House cafeteria for breakfast this morn- ngr, witnesses said, Knutson told Bngel he was "following the C.I.O. line" in opposing the cut. Engel told newsmen later, laugh- ng, that "after Harold made that remark, he started to run, and I wouldn't let him." Dakotan said. "Russians visiting the United States 'have been allowed to photograph industrial Installations and other properties when even Americans weren't allowed to do so, "Yet, Americans In Russia ar restricted sharply in their move ments. There has been no recipro city, except on a one-way basis, wit the Russians generally getting from us what they demand." Mundt told the house yesterda that existence cf the Russian boo probably "is one of the reasons th Russians arc not interested in ar ranging for an interchange of in spection." "Russia Is getting all the Infor motion they want about our defensi over here and they are not Inter ested now in making any conces> slons that might permit America to earn what they are going over he continued, "maybe If we make it more difficult for tliem to et further information, it will help Secretary of State Marshall, it will lelp Warren Austin (American United Nations get nn greement with Russia from the Two Boys Help, Then Rob Chicago Woman in Storm heavy wind and icy made walking and an Mm, Dora Kalnite, 41, ncared her west side home two boys took hold ot her arms and prevented her from falling-. "They were such nice looking- little Mrs. Kalnite said, "and they steadied my pace un- til we came to an alley near my home." Then, she related to FUlmore street police, the boyc nhovcd her Into the alley. One (Tabbed her purse containing M3 and his companion took her wrist watch and three rlnci she val- ued at Snowfall tandpoint of controlling the atomic omb by having Internal inspection." Mundt, a member of the House orelgn affairs and un-American cHvltles committees, said he favors Jiving Russia the same concessions ic gives us, and no more." ioover to Leave on Survey Sunday Washington Former Presi- cnt Herbert Hoover said today he ill leave Sunday by piano to begin s survey of food conditions in ermany and Austria. Blizzard Sidelights In spite of hazardous driving conditions, no accidents were re- ported to Winona police up to noon today. The Wisconsin Associated Press leased wire to The Re- publican-Herald was "out" for a time during the heighth of the blizzard. There was no in- terruption on the Minnesota wire. At Hixton, Wis., clogged roads stopped even the rural mailman jeep. The mailman started out o bis route, got stuck a mile out o town and after being pulled ou returned to the village. If It Isn't one thing. It's an- other. That's the way the Gales- ville Curling- club members felt today as they got their second bad break in weather. The an- nual Bobby Burns bonspiel was first scheduled for last week- end, but was "melted out" by warm weather. Now the heavy snowfall and blocked roads is handicapping the curlers In reaching Galesville. The bon- spiel will to on as scheduled, though. Little Idaho Town Sold for By Jack Bewlns Dixie, Idaho This little town In the highest, wildest hills of where s a cougar's yowl is all the alarm clock needed, been purchased by Earl Thomas Scott for only This is what Scott, ex-prospector, ex-marine, ex-salesman and soldier, got for his money: Several mining claims, 153 acres of land, an eight-room hotel, post- office, general store, and gas pump, a vacant saloon, a one-room school- louse, a seven-grave cemetery and several vacant log buildings. In a way, also, he fell heir to the population of Dixie, down to the one-dog canine section and the one-cow dairy. In humans. It num- bers 15, Including five children and two women prospectors. Dixie was born in the gold rush of 1864, reached a population of or more at its height, and died along about 1905 when the gold veins slimmed out. But Dixie has always had a few prospectors and its little general store. Scott was trying to get a loan to purchase a placer claim when he Heard about Dixie, changed his plans and bought the town from Leslie R. Powelson, who had lived here since 1911. Scott says he plans to turn Dixie into a dude ranch. I The District Golden Gloves box- ng tournament which got under ray at Rochester Wednesday night ill be postponed until next week ecause of blocked roads. Second ound matches were scheduled for onight at the Mnyo Civic audi- .orium. No date has been set for he next round of fights. w w While attendance at the Rochester Golden Gloves box- ing- show was low, the Wa- bjusha double-header basketball program last night drew the largest crowd in several years, with the crowning of the Wa- Fire queen the betwccn- games feature. Wabasha High beat Nelson, 41-34, while St, Felix of Wabasha nipped Alma, Wis., 36-35. W The Winona office of the Bell Here Totals 16 Inches Poor Visibility Keeps Plows Off Highways Sixteen inches of light snow, farmed by a wind up to 28 miles an hour, today reduced, traffic the Winona area to a mini- mum, delayed some trains as much as seven hours and added up to the worst blizzard of winter. Many schools were closed, some is schedules were canceled and business houses were nearly barren of customers. Delivery of mnji la he rural areas was Infrequent. It may get worse before the day s over. The Weather bureau pre- icts that winds up to 20 miles an our will continue until midnight nd the temperature will 
                            

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