Winona Republican Herald, January 20, 1947

Winona Republican Herald

January 20, 1947

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Issue date: Monday, January 20, 1947

Pages available: 14

Previous edition: Saturday, January 18, 1947

Next edition: Tuesday, January 21, 1947 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Winona Republican Herald

Publication name: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Pages available: 38,914

Years available: 1947 - 1954

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 20, 1947, Winona, Minnesota W EATHER tnnlfht. fd outil F OLLOW Steve Canyon Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations D.lly On BACK fAOX VOLUME 46. NO. 283 WINONA. MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 20. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Impeachment of Judge in Portal Pay Suit Sought Greek Ship Hits Mine, Sinks; 437 Missing Goes Down 20 Miles From Athens Men Battle Women and Children for Space in Lifeboat! n.r N. S, C'hukulrx The merchant rrm- rj.-ir ministry totlny Increased to 437 the list of pcrxon.M mlswlnK and be- llr-vctl clrncl In the itlnklng of the l.noo-frm Crrfk xtrnmrr Chlmurrn, which went (Uiwii 20 mllen cast of Alhrii.4 nfter an explosion fifflrliillv hliuiii'd fii 11 mine. Intent flKiirr.i riullorcl hero from Milpiilnit officers In Miilonlkii the vcwwil wna -iirrylriK MB piuwcnKcrs nntl a crew of when she left there Saturday, Thus fur. the murlno ministry wild, only 198 survivors [ire definite- ly known, ornriul.i of the ministry, which nAlrt last nli.'fit that ttyi former Cirrmitti pa.'wnKer ship hud struck it mine, declined to comment on n rrport that the vessel was n vic- tim of Thcro was no Indication, however, that they gave nny credence to the report. Many Women, Children Lout Arlstldc.n Mytnkls, n 44-yoar-oll school trnchcr who survived the disaster, estimated that almost 20{ of the casualties were women and children. "I am nfrulcl every child aboard Jont nnd per cent of the he.i ftld. M.vtakln xnld the nhlp snnk no qulclcly thnt only two of her life- boats nould bo launched. He do- nrribcd the vc.wl's decks as a "solid wall of cursing, fighting men" iiirufigllnB frantlcnlly to save their lives. The Chlmarra. which untied from Suloniku Nnturdny, hit thn mine A trw mllc.i off shore from Raflna. Talmadge Denies Office to Georgia's New Lt. Governor M. E. Thompson Britain Denies Breaking Pact With Russians British govern- Thompson Will Have Desk in State Senate Atlanta In a face-to-face encounter across the executive desk Herman Talmadge refused today to yield the governorship of Georgia to Lieutenant Governor M. E Thompson who claims to be "acting governor." Thompson Immediately announc- ed he would occupy the office of senate president on the second floor of the state capital "until this mat- ter is fully adjudicated by the courts of Georgia." Tnlmadgo told Thompson "You have no right to claim this office. There la no vacancy. Tho general of Georgia has elected me as governor." Thompson said "I take issue with ou on that. If the courts decide hat I am lawful governor I call }n you to cooperate with me fully n the best interests of the state. By the same token. If you are de- lared governor It Is my purpose jo cooperate with you." made no reply to this. is Seeks Court Ruling Thompson said "Then there 10 argument between us but that his shall go to a decision in the Talmadge answered in the af- rmstlvo and Thompson arose to eave, eaylng he would occupy of- ces of the senate president until be matter is adjudicated. Talmsdge rose and "There 111 be no objection from me." At Thompson left the governor's fflce at a. m., he told mem- bers replying to RuMlan presa criticism of its foreign policy! has sent a message to Prime Minister Stalin strongly denying that Foreign Sec- the press thronging the case rotary dinted" Ernest Bovln has "repu- Britain's 20-ycor treaty of Mytitklx Mild the uhlp'it master at- tempted to beach tho vessel, but jirovrntecl from doing .so by a broken control rudder. Survivors siilcl the scores of panlc- strlrfccn pn.vrngcr.i Icupnd Into tho frik'ltl waters of the KUlf us the lurched about before dt hern. trapped below decks. MTi-umert In terror tin tlio wttled beneath tin- surface. Clipiljr I.lfrlxutl Ojicrutor George Frcrln Mild the friir-trmitdi.'iied passengers fmicht w> madly to tret Into one lifrboiit thut It and "I believe all iitmurd wero drowned. Frcrut. thn ma.ilrr of tho find tho first and wcmid rnutc.i were (tie IUNI to li'nvo irm sinking .-.hip. They wore life hi'lt.i. "U> for w-vi-riil hours bc- alliance with the Soviet union. The foreign office disclosed last night that it had dispatched to Moscow a note charterizlng as "most misleading" and "absurd" a Pravda nrtlclo on January IS interpreting n address by Bevln an meaning that the pact had been mipnr.icclod by Britain's United tlonn commitment. Tho note wan delivered to Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov Saturday with a request that it bo Immediately to Stalin. The action of the foreign office, which usually ignores Soviet news- paper comment, was generally ac- cepted hero an an indication of labor government concern over continuing advernu criticism of British policy by both Russian press and radio. entirely In the courts." Tho note declared had removed from that Pravda the context Dovln'K statement in New York on December 22 that Britain "docs not tlo herself to anybody except in regard to her obligations under the dinner" of the United Nations. Earlier, Talmadge reoccupled the executive offices behind, a trebled guard of state police and announced "There Is only one person who is governor." Hope to Tie Up Funds At the same time State Attorney General Eugene Cook was ready to announce details of additional litigation against the 33-year-old son of tho late Eugene Talmadge, this time to prevent his use of state funds and property. In a rapid-fire exchange of state- ments yesterday, Talmadge, elected chief executive by the general as- sembly lust, week, accused Thomp- son of threatening use of force in gaining the executive chambers, adding that "We are amply able to defend the governor's office and will do so if necessary." Father and Five Children Dead in Pennsylvania Fire Pleasanlvllle, ex- plosion In a wood stove itarted a flre that killed five children, seriously burned their mother and resulted In the death of the fumes and amoke ho sought to rescue the victims from a blazing, four- room .farmhouse. The 34-year-old mother, An- nette, Is in fair condition at Tltusville hospital. Hurled Into the yard by the force of yes- terday's blast, her dress afire, suffered second degree burns. Kenneth Robinson said he drove Emerson home just In time to see the explosion, be- lieved caused by gasoline acci- dentally thrown on thn stove. He laid the father tried to en- ter the burning building but fell dead from the fumes as he stepped into the doorway. Opposition in 'oland Plans 'lea to Court Warsaw Vice-Premier tanlslaw Mikolajczyk, leader of the pposition Polish Peasant party, lunted today that he might seek upreme court nullification of yes- terday's parliamentary election, in! officials forecast victory the Communist-dominated govern- ment bloc. The voting was marked by scat- tered violence resulting In the death of eight persons, all apparent- ly slain in raids by the antigovern- ment underground, which had threatened forays during tho vote counting. Mikolajczyk, who was booed at the polls, charged that a consti- tutional guarantee of the secret ballot .had been violated and jald he probably would ask the supreme court to declare the election invalid. Scattered, unofficial returns, in- we managed to barrel.-: a hold on Frcrl.f "This ht MI XT our llvr.s. Later wo wore Viickril up liy u calcine. There wore about 'M survivors on the cnlque, which vii.i heavily loaded." J-'lvc ships were dispatched to tho wcne when nrw.i of tho disaster rrtiftii-tl On- innrlne ministry. Planes iilsrr aided In the rescue. AnHUiK the aboard the vrv..i wi-ro Minn: SO political clc- en route to un Island exile. Scum- of the first survivors reach- ing Athens were seriously Injured. Mum' others wrrr treated for burns nnd minor Injuries. 98% Convictions in Criminal Cases Sl. ratil wer nbliiuu-d In Minnesota- by federa prosecutors in on cent of th