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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 18, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 18, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER Generally ronllhurtl mild ton11hi i Sunday e loud 7 and warmer. F OLLOW Steve Canyon Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations On PAflK VOLUME 46, NO. 282 W1NONA. MINNESOTA. SATURDAY EVENING, JANUARY 18, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES 21 Arrested for 30 Trucks A mail Resigns AsLt. Governor Takes Oath 'Courts Will Uphold Georgian Says Served on Talmadge for Hearing Feb. 7 BULLETIN Atlanta Lieutenant Onvrrnor M. K. Thompson uld todny hr considered hlmnrlf the sirtlne covrrnor of Georgia. Atlanta Ellin Arniill qul covernor of Georgia today an pa.wc! the fight with Herman Tnl ii-iadc'' for thi' executive office ovo !n Lieutenant Governor M. E Thompson. There was no Indication whethc Thompson would continue the fight Arnoir.i announcement that h ended his battle with Talmadg over the governorship was made TO newsmen at n conference shortl; nfrrr Thompson toolc tho office o hrutcnant governor. Las: Saturday Arnall handed his resignation to the secretary of itate r.'frctlve Immediately after the qualification of the lieutenant gov- ernor." In his statement to newsmen Arnall said "the clearly enable the lieutenant governor to become nctlng governor, vented with !he full, absolute powers of govern- ment until tho people of Georgia fleet ft governor to fill the un- explrrd term." Arnall's statement xald he con- ttrlfrrd his resignation effective as of n. m. C. S. T. today, the hour that Thompson took the oath of office In nn almost empty Orortflri KnnlK chamber. His prepared statement nlso said hr was r-ontldcul thut thin ucllon will mrri with the upprovul of a %rst. majority of the of the r-.nte. Likewise I am certain that the court will uphold the constitu- tion of Georgia ana that bv the people, democracy, law and order will be sustained." Thompson originally had planned TO take the onth Monday nt 11 a. m. before the state senate, but In prepared statement Issued after be- Ing sworn In today, he sold he hod been advised by the attorney gen- eral that "under the law It might be necessary that I take my oath before the expiration of this week." The onth today wax administered to Thompson in nn almost empty wnate chamber by Judge Hugh Mftclntyre of the state court of appeals. An authoritative source opposed to Talrnadge asserted today that Tnlmndpe forces would Jmpeuch (Continued on Page IZ, Column 1) GKOUGIA Four Dead in Parked Auto at BeuUh, N. D. Four young two men and two women, found dead In a ear in Beulah thli morning -were vlctlmi of carbon monoxide poi- soning, Mercer County Coroner Brrnle Halverion laid today. Ilalverion uJd the were: Edna Hermann, 20, BeuUh. Either Rueb, 25, BenUh. George Schuerer, 21, Golden Valley. Erhardt Stern, 21. Golden Valley. The bodlei were dlicorered 5 a. m. today la a coupe parked in front of the Hermann home by Philip Hermann, Kdnn'i father. The motor of the car was running. Halvorson said the two coupled had attended a dance Friday night. The glrl'i father told the eoroner that he hcarU the car in front of the house about 2 a. m., ana looked out and saw it parked with the motor run- ning, and went back to sleep. He awoke at 5 and saw the oar outside with the motor running. Investigated in alarm, and found the bodies, Halvor- laid. The coroner said he believed all four had been dead about three hours when their bodies were discovered. Beulah U 75 miles northwest of Bismarck in Mcr- county. Golden Valley Is about ten milei west of Beulah. Congress Set to Aid Truman in Recapture Of Unspent War Funds Washington A move by President Truman to return more than of unspent appropriations to "unobli- gated" status In the treasury drew a quick assist from Congress Central Lutheran Church Purchases Norton Property A portion of the Norton prop- erty at Huff and Wabasha streets has been purchased by the Central Lutheran congrega- tion, Dr. L. E. Brynestad, pai- tor of the church, announced today. The property will eventually be used for a new church plant, Dr. Brynestad said, but imme- diate plans have not been for- mulated. Consisting of three lots with ISO fcot of frontage on Wabasha. street, the purchased property Is 150 feet deep.' The W. W. Norton home for-. ntcrly located there was razed several years ago. Purchase price was today. Chairman Taber (R.-N. of the House appropriations com- mittee told reporters his group will act on Mr. Truman's recom- Minister and Choir Singer ace Eisenhower Warns of Atomic Bomb Complex in U. S. Army Dwlcht D. Elsenhhower snys -Imendatlon probably next week. Some of the appropriations will be canceled, removing them from the spending program for the 1947 fiscal year ending next June 30. Authority to spend another por- of unnceded lend- lease with the end of the 1946 fiscal year last June 30. These funds the President is with- drawing from the of various agencies and placing in tho treas- ury surplus fund, Not Enough The action will not affect Mr. Truman's budget esti- mates for 1948, aald a White House statement announcing it late yester- day, because the cancellations "were 100 Chinese )rown When Ships Collide Shanghai W> Four hundred Chinese were reported drowned to- day when a small passenger steam- er, the Chekiang, collided with a tug and sank in the Yangtze river off Woosung, near Shanghai. The Chekiang carried pas- sengers. mediately began demanding com- pensation from tho Chinese ship- owner, charging that the vessel hat been dangerously overloaded. The disaster occurred as the crowded Chekiang, bound from Shanghai for the lower Yangtze porl of Nantung, collided with one of two steel lighters being towed by a 'iUg. Witnesses alleged that the tug Ig- nored signals to change course. Tho. passenger vessel was crowd- d with Chinese Intending to spend he Chinese new year holidays, tarttng January 22, In their home owns. The Chekiang sank almost mmedlately. 500.000 to Guard Voting In Poland Government Victory in Sunday Election Believed Assured By Larry Allen Warsaw The government mobilized security police and ,-olunter militiamen today to guard he polls In tomorrow's parliament- ary election, first since the Ger- mans marched'in September 1, 1939, and started World War II. Colonel Roman Romchowskl of he ministry of public security said layings of election commission members and militiamen had passed ie loo He reported that 38 halrmen, vice-chairmen and mem- ers of local district election com- missions were killed In pre-election errorlst attacks by the underground rganizatlon "WIN" and bands onnected with it. In addition, he said, 51 militia- men, security police" arid soldiers ere killed In gunfights with bands ttacklng polling places. Another 5 were kidnapped and presumed lied, he said, adding that the at- 1mlitacks were continuing- In widely or victims im- Missing High School Girls Found in Twin Cities; En Route Home After being missing since Tuesday, Nancy Greer and Vir- ginia Anderson, both 16, were expected to return la their homes here today. A telephone call was received this morning by Mrs. Lulu An- derson, mother of Virginia, from Mrs. Edna Greer who said she had located the girb in the Twin cities and was driving home with them. Mrs, Greer is Nancy'i mother. The girb disappeared after basketball game at La Croue Tuesday and were traced from there to Anilin and from Austin to Owatonna. They were known to have started hitch-hiking north from Owatonna Thursday morning. Mrs. Greer went to the Twin Cities Friday on a hunch that the girU might be there. She said yesterday that she believed the girls had left because they feared expulsion from school for playing "hookey." Both are jun- at Winona Senior nigh school. scattered sectors of the country. Government Victory Seen The opposition has charged that a victory for the Communist-domln- ated government bloc In tomorrow's! voting Is predetermined. The big fight will be between the government bloc under Premier Edward osubka-Morawski, Socialist and the opposition Polish Peasant party (PSD under Vice-Premier Stanislaw Mlkolajczyk. The government has accused Mlkolajczyk. and his followers of a tleup with the murderous anti- government underground, while Anoka Patrolman taken into consideration" i these estimates were made. IVIllea at Taber mid of the President's re- capture move: "That helps. But it is not any- where near enough. It would help more If he would eliminate some undesirable functions, such as the of Auto Mishap Anoka, Verl Whin- ery, 68, night patrolman in Anoka was fatally injured today when struck by an automobile while dl- One Missing in Cleveland Fire Mikolajczyk has charged the gov- ernment with mob and security police suppression of his party. The United States, Britain and Russia will be waiting for the elec- ,ion result. The Soviet union span- Losses Cost Shippers New York Ring Believed Broken by F.B.I. Xew Federal Bu- reau of Investigation announced to- day the arrest of 20 men here and one In Miami Beach. Fla., who they said comprised a gang which has been responsible for more than 30 truck hijackings here In the past year at a cost of to ship- pers. Edward Scheldt, special agent in charge of the New York office, said the arrests "struck a blow at the 'icart of hijackers and motor truck Jiicvcs who have victimized New York city business concerns of quantities of scarce and expensive merchandise." The men weao members of 'Wcsto" gang, he said, and their arrests followed months of investi- gation. Schoidt said that among those arrested was Salvatorc Imperiale. 34. of Brooklyn who used the Salvatorc Westo" and directed the gang's activities "with the finest of a business executive and devoted 5is entire time to planning opera- tions against truck shipments." He was arrested, Scheldt said. and Ills chief lieutenant, Romeo rafola, alias "The Judge." 36, and Frank Gagliardi, alias "Frame, The 39, both of Brooklyn. The F.B.I. agent said the three leaders would locate valuable truck- Irfg shipments and arrange for the rest of the gang to hijack thr truck, but Imperiale never would take an active part in the actual hijacking. Scheldt said ImperlaJe would wait in one of his two trucks, for the loot. Firemen are shown here fighting a flash flre at Knickerbocker Manor in Cleveland where woman was unaccounted tor and feared lost, (A.F. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) explosion and lash fire wrecked the 28-room Knickerbocker Manor on Cleve- and's Bast Side today and a 65- rtar-old woman was missing in thi debris. iored .the provisional government! At least 12 persons were Injuret crazy operations of the Commercerectlng traffic at the scene of department." accident. Taber said the recapture would Whlnery was struck by an auto not further Republican tax driven by Virgil Oswald, 19 tlon plans, "since the money he Anoka. and died shortly afte dealing with already has been Im- pounded." He explained the Presi- dent's action merely transfers the unexpended funds formally to an unobligated status. reaching St. Andrew's hospital In Minneapolis. The original accident involved cars driven by Mrs. Stella Bamil I ton, 20, Minneapolis, and Edward. Grand Mich. husband by her side, Mrs. Mary Marguerite Cowles, 40-year-old   General of the choir singer, appeared In court to- charged with committing the United states "cannot permit adultery with a middle-aged Meth- romplncrncv or an 'atomic bomb odlst minister whom she accompa- The President recommended tojM- Lynch, 221, Minneapolis. The Congress the repeal of appropria- tions totaling includ- ing: possible modern coun- terpart tit the 'Maglnot line men- lull us into another post- war apathy." "The muzzle velocity of war has increased in geometric progression from thr musket to the Eu.i-nhowcr said hist night at an Industry-Army day dinner. "Thr time Interval between In- assnult nnd u crippled nation liiu. been narrowed by every im- provement in offensive The chief of staff said. "An Incon- testable conclusion that emerges from World War II Is that modern arc fought -vlth the con- c'-r.ecl strength of whole nations. nnd that the Integration of our national economy Into nn effective s.ecunty machine must be ac- thought and In plan in-fore an emergency occurs." motor trip. The brunette Mrs. Cowles, mother Weather FOHKCAST Winotia and vicinity Generally utid continued mild tonight; jrnv -4 to 2C. Sunday mostly cloudy rlMiic temperature; high 45 to Minnesota: Increasing cloudiness toniKht with rising temperature north portion. Sunday cloudy and windy with occasional light snow utirt warmer north portion. WiseonMn: Partly cloudy tonight nnd Sunday with occasional light .-.now northwest und extreme north portion Sunday. Rhine temperatures north nnd central portions Sunday. LOCAL UKATHKK ORltlal observations for the 24 hours enclliiK ut 12 m, today: Maximum.-14; minimum. 19; noon, precipitation, none; sun sota to- ut 4-117; Mm rises tomorrow ut 7 :M, TKMI'KltATI-'llKS KI.SKWIIERE of a grown son, demanded an ex- amination, which was act tor Feb- ruary 7. Her husband, Paul, 40, a sales- man, posted bond of and ac- companied her from the courtroom. He told newsmen: "I will take her back. I have for- Ktven her. I don't blame her; I blame her nervous condition and I believe It was mostly the minister's fault." Mrs. Cowles and .the Rev. Daniel Reedy, 64-year-old grandfather nnd a minister for 27 years, sur- rendered to police Friday. He appeared later the same day on the adultery charge and also demanded examination, which was scheduled for the same date. His wife, Grace, posted a ilmllar 'bond for his release. Mrs. Cowles came to court from receiving hospital where she had been under treatment for what at- Mnx. IVnvrr .11 Ixis GO Miami 77 I'nul -I'J N' w Orlrun.'; Nrw York   sota aren't In storage for Just a couple of months. Operators who don't want to store them for the next two years had better sell Governor Luther Youngdahl warned Friday. At a meeting of the St. Paul Xnights of Columbus in the Ath- ctlc club, the governor said that a number of bills with "teeth" nrc jelng prepared for presentation to he legislature which will strength- en his campaign for law enforce- ment throughout the state. Rural taverns where only 3.2 beer s spld but where youths in their teens are allowed to spike their drinks with alcohol will be the tar- get of a bill now being prepared by the attorney general's office, Young- dahl said. "No one can accuse me of merely trying to stir things up in Minne- he continued. "As long as the people of Minnesota keep a law against gambling in the statutes it is my responsibility as governor to support the law." Although he is an American Le- gion leader, the governor said he has pointed out to posts in the state that it Is a fallacy to "say in one breath that we will support law and in the next support slot, machines to maintain the club house." Pope Charges Civil Rights Denied Many By John McKnight Vatican Pius XTT addressing a group of ten American newspaper editors and writers who arrived in Rome yesterday to start an army-conducted tour of Europe, said today that "ruthless persecu- tion of men's civil and rcligfoua rights has not ceased" in the post- War world. Receiving the newspapermen In the library of the Apostolic palace, the pontiff praised Ameri- can generosity in aiding Europe's war sufferers. Yet Americans who came to assistance "of the victims who sur- vived the nppalling holocause little the Pope added, "that the food and clothing which they were so lavishly shipping overseas would be in some countries tagged with a price. The price ol adherence to political party." "Denial of men's civil and religi- ous rights has not he con- tinued. "Ruthless persecution of men's consciences lias not abated. Nor Is it surprising. But it U tragic." After his brief address, which warn in English, the Pope chatted affably with each of the newsmen, recalled to several his visit to the United Slates while he was cardinal secre- tary of state, and asked that his greetings be conveyed to President Truman and the American cardi- nals. His enforcement campaign will not exempt "the American Legion, the Eagles clubs or any other organ- he said. Minnesota now will largely shape Citizens Defend Elizabeth's Right to Marry Philip By Ed Crcagh London Thousands of Princess Elizabeth's future subjects, registering their sentiments through an unprecedented newspaper poll, today defended her right to marry rumors can be believed. In a final report of Its two-week XSMUMJS K, 5 "Something is wrong within our lcUcns fmm ft" classcs" the Sun' society when a 14-year-old boy has to write me as governor to thank me for my stand against the slot machine and gambling he said. These army and navy leaders assemble at the White Bouse for a news conference to explain details of their agreement on a compromise merger plan. Left to right, seated, Secretary of Navy James For- restal and Secretary of War Robert Patterson; standing. Major General Laurls Norstad, assistant chief of air staff, army air forces; Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, chief of staff to the President; General Dwight Eisenhower, army chief of staff; Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz, chief of naval operations; Vice- Admiral F. P. Sherman, deputy chief of naval operations. (A.T. .Wirephoto.) Russians Told of Atom Bomb Damage Moscow The Russian pub- lic today received its first eyewit- ness account of the devastation wrought by atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nnfraskl. Japan, L. Vysokoostrovski, correspondent for the magazine New Times, re- porting on visits to both cities, ex- pressed some doubt as to the bomb's military significance but stressed that "it took many lives of de- fenseless people." Minneapolis Store Robbed of Burglars blew open a safe In the Kenwood phar- macy in Minneapolis during the night and took approximately 500 in cash. Several fountain pon.s, three ,clectrlc razors and other ar- ticles also if ItOlM. day Pictorial said C4 per cent now favored Princess Elizabeth's marry- ing the Greek prince, compared with 55 per cent Rt the end of poll's first week. Those in the poll opposing the. mnrrinKc dropped from 40 per cent to S2 per cent, four per cent with five per cent last no objection to the marriage but believe the princess, if she marries Philip, should, not succeed to the British throne. Damage in Kenosha Fire Krnosha. second serious flrc in four months swept the Aisled Manfacturing Company slant four miles west of Kenosha ast night, destroying a two-story frame foundry building and a con- icctlng machine works. The lost iva.s estimated by Edward J. Alsted. of the company, at be- .wecn and September another Last blaze burned cupola building of the foundry with a loss estimated at SIO.OOO. The cause of yesterday's waa jundotennlned.   

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