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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 17, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 17, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press c Member of the Audit Bureau of STEVE -ANYON Follow His Advent! Dally Ob the BACK PAGE VOLUME 46, NO. 281 WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING. JANUARY 17, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWELVE PAGES Limited Hits Auto, Farm Worker Killed Service Chiefs Back Army-Navy Merg Minister of Defense to Be Chosen Air Service to Be Given Separate Ranking Wuhinrton The army and navy high command, ofrrced on a pliin for "unification." today prom- j.'.pd coopfnuion and greater effi- ciency under a single cabinet offl- Tr'r. Onf by one. Secretary of War Pat- terson, Secretary of the Navy For- rrxtal. Atlmirul Chester W, Nimltz w.-id General D, Elsenhower C.v.'r their wholehearted cndorsc- to the new plan. Thry spoke to a crowded news con.'rrt-ncc in the White House movie theater. Then they turned the meeting over to experts to go into details. for the most part, the plan, an- nounced by President Truman last H. L. Harrington, First Missing Girls National Cashier, Dead Last Reported At Owatonna Truman Undecided Washington Peraoni to President Truman (aid today he has not decided on whom to nominate for the pro- posed new cabinet poll of sec- retary of national defense If authorizes unification of the armed of theie people think William Stuart Symington a likely choice for secretary of the air force, one of the three "under" secretaries. Symington, a resident of St. I.ouln, Is now anlatant secretary of war for air. H. I. Harrington night, remained only a general proposition, with the chinks to be filled In later. Congress will have n big hand In fhor. Tn lUro Dflfntf MinlnUr Pic.ilclrntlnl Preiw Hecre-tnry Chnr- O. Rorji, openlnK tho ncmlnar, cleared up ono point that there will be only one cabinet member for defense not four, as previously conjectured. The arrangement i.i to have three secretaries one each for army. navy and ftlr, serving under a sec- retary of national defense. Only tho latter, Ross said, will be in ths cabinet. But the others can be called In when necessary. "In our view." Patterson said, "It 'the plan) Is a sound nnd workable procedure with the needed single di- rection and nt the same time it preserve tho valuable clement of local autonomy In the three branches." Forrestal arose to assert, as he hnd done during the war In testify- ing before congressional committees, "me, too." Admiral Nimltz said he consid- ers the plan u "definite and sub- stantial forward stop nnd I shall support it to the best or my ability." He- said it will enable the services to Kel toRpthrr on many essential mat- ters nnd make progress. Klwnhowrr Present General Elsenhower, wearing a Korlda tan. said he always has de- plored the differences between army nnrt nnvy officers over n merger (ind new that they had resolved he personally will "support it with nil I have" as a "distinctive step forward." The. United States, he r.ald. will be the great gainer by a Bill to Block Industry-Wide Strikes Drawn By Max Hall Washington -Representa- tive Landls (RJnd.) said today he will Introduce a bill to prevent In- dustry-wide strikes because "this country can't go through another steel or coal strike." Landls, a one-time cosJ miner who now is in an Influential spot In Congress as second-ranking Repub- lican on the House labor committee, told a reporter 1. The House commlttM ought to "right away becaiuc of the anticipated steel strike." The C.I.O. United 8 leel workers filed a 80-day strike notice Tuesday. 2. "We most hare bill pass- ed by March deadline set by John Lewis for pos- sible resumption of the soft eoal strike. 3. Mueh of the labor legis- lation proposed so far "misses the point" because It doesn't deal with strike problem. 4. The bills by Senator Ball to outlaw various forms of the cloved shop and to prohibit Industry-wide bar- gaining "don't solre the situa- tion." 5. All proposals to outlaw the closed shop are "unconstitu- LnndJs said his bill would au- thorize government seizure and Active in Civic, Business Affairs of City Harry L. Harrington, cashier o the First National bank, a position to which he was re-elected Tuesday and long active in civic and bus! ness affairs of the city, died at his home at 8 a. m. today after an ill- ness of ten weeks. He would have been 56 years old January 24. A complication of ailments causec death although he has never been in ill health until a few weeks ago A lifelong resident of Wlnona, Mr Harrington began his banking career when he was IS years old as a mes- senger for the old Deposit bank. When the Deposit bank was merged with the First National bank he be- came an officer of the later or- ganization and eventually worked himself up to the position of cashier He had been a banker for 38 years, and was born In Wlnona January 24, 1891. Mr. Harrington was a past mas- ter of the Wlnona Masonic lodge and was a 32nd degree Mason, a member of the Wlnona Consistory. He had been active In Boy Scout work here for 25 years and at the time of his death was treasurer of the Masonic bodies, secretary of the Woodlawn Cemetery associa- tion, treasurer of the Wlnona coun- ty chapter of the American Red Cross and a member of the official board of Central Methodist church. He has held various church offices In the past. He also was a member of Azarbal- Jan grotto, a Masonic organization. Pair May Be Hitchhiking to California Socialist Named Premier of France the Order of Eastern Star, the Im- proved Order of Red Men, Wlnona Rotary club. Be also was vice-president Stott Bon Corporation. Twin Cities, Austin and Owatonna authorities joined today In the search for two Wlnona high school girls who have been missing since Tuesday. It Is now believed that the girls are hitchhiking, probably north. They were last seen at Owatonna where they spent Wednesday night, police have learned. They started on the road to Farlbault Thursday morning. In La Crosse, one of the ;irla had told a companion that hey planned to hitchhike to Cali- ornla to visit her father, Dr. H, O. Anderson. The two, Nancy Oreer and Vir- ;lnla Anderson, 'both 16, left La Crosse, where they had attended a ilgh school basketball game Tues- ay evening, about 3 a. m. Wednes- day. R. J. Williams, principal of the Wlnona Senior High school where roth girls ,are juniors, said that Nancy had been absent Monday aft- ernoon and all day Tuesday and that Virginia was absent both Mon- day and Tuesday. On Tuesday afternoon, he said, he was notified by La Crosse school authorities that the girls were In school there. They told various per- sons that there was no school In Wlnona and had come to visit, Mr. Williams called Nancy's mother, Talmadge Expands Hold on Capitol In Georgia Fight Survivors are Mrs. HurrlnRton; r daughter, Mrs. Carl G, Gaustad Wlnona; two sons, Lyman with the U. S. air corps at Orlando, Fla., and Richard, a student at Hamllno university, St. Paul; three grandchildren and one sister, Mrs. Henry Olseth, Wlnona. Funeral services will be at the Central Methodist church Mon- day at 3 p. MI. with Dr. H. D. Henry In charge. Burial will be In Woodlawn cemetery with the Ma- sonic lodge in charge. The body will lie in state at the church Mon- day from 2 p. m. until the time of the funeral. Friends may call at the Fawcett- Hillycr chape] Sunday afternoon and evening. Mrs, Edna Greer, and told her ol the Incident, of Afraid to Return Mrs. Qreer said today that she Vincent Aurlol Paris President Vin- eent Aurlol tonight nominated Socialist Paul Ramadler, 59- year-old economist and lawyer, as French premier. Ramadler recently was minis- ter of Justice. Leon Blum, who served as Interim president and premier pending AuroU's election yester- day, declined nomination as permanent premier because of lus health. Blum Is 74. other steps to block strikes that afffcct Interstate commerce in steel, coal, food, public utilities, and in activities involving the public health or safety. He declined to give details, how- pf this nature, Durinp the seminar. President: Trumiui met with his cabinet at their rcfruinr Friday session In nn- othrr part of the White House. The mcctlnfr was largely devoted to n cllicusslon of the army-navy "unification" uKTcement. Secretary of Agriculture Anderson told reporters the President "seemed jilraM-d" about the agreement and "Jhii'.'s about as fur as we got." When it. came to details, ques- tions at the news seminar brought out those points: The plans make no specific provi- sion In themselves for a single purchasing department for oil branches or the armed services. But (Continued on Page 7, Column 1.) AKMV-NAVY ever, until he introduces Monday. the Weather "I think I've got the stuff to do the Landls asserted. He added that he also plans bill to change the Wagner labor relations act. One purpose would be to remove an employer's obliga- tion to re-employ workers who quit work on or sympathy strikes, or   of ic crash. He had been employed at the farm, located about six miles from the crossing, for the last two years. The crossing is close to state highway 35 near the Welnandy farm. Schorbahn, said Coroner Stohr. hnd a badly cut leg and a crushed skull. The train, known as No. 47, Is due to pass throuRh Cochrane where it docs not stop, at B. m. and was on time. It is scheduled to stop at Alma nt a. m. Schorbahn was born In the town of Glcncoc near Whitehall Septem- jcr 13, 1913. HP is survived by 'atlier. Ernest Schorbahn. Whlte- inll, and one brother, Eldon. town of Glcncoe. Funeral arrangements fire incomplete. Support Price :or Eggs Fixed buildings are located. But this year, the bay is piled high with ice. Demolition experts will study ways of blasting out level pro rated among the various benc- .03flclarlcs of the trusts. Black smoke pours from a Goodyear Latex Company fabrication plant at Los Anceles as fire sweeps through stocks of foam rubber. Company officials estimated damage at J100.000. The flre is reported to have started when a workman dropped a piece of hot rubber Into a im heater. Three employes were injured. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.; Committee Continuance of Special War Taxes Washington (IP) Legislation continuing Indefinitely the wartime taxes on liquor, luggage, trans- portation and many other Items re- ceived unanimous approval today from the House ways and means committee. It was the first major bill to get endorsement from a congressional committee this session. Without congressional action, most of these taxes will drop a lower rate July 1. Congressional leaden; decided to keep them at present levuls and aim for a cut In Indi- vidual income taxes. areas for unloading nearly tons of equipment from the cargo ships Yancey and Merrick. Then, scouts must find snow arches or ramps to the iceshelf. The only break the expedition Is getting Is the fact that the Ice shelf surface is smooth. The jo of building an airstrip may no be too difficult. Slot machines are illegal in Min- csota, therefore slot machine pro- fits presumably constitute "ill-got- ten" gains. An opinion on the W) The Affrieul- ure department Indicated last night t will support producer prices of Kgs at a national average of 35 to 6 cents n dozen between February nnd April 30. Under a support program for any ommodity, the department to buy at Its support price any sur- plus rcfrulnr markets cannot take. The indication on egg prices in the form of an announcement matter was that the department Is expanding Premier of Italy Returns to Rome Borne Premier Alclde de Gasperi returned today from a two- week trip to the United States and Immediately began negotiations to save his six-month-old, four-party government from a collapse threat- ened by a Socialist party split. D iver Recovers Body of Child at Breckenridge Breokenrldge, Minn. A professional diver working un- der the lee in the Otter Tall river yesterday located the body of four-year-old Carol Rae Mc- who disappeared last Friday. The child, daughter of Mr. and Mm. Clyde McLaughlln, dis- appeared while playing on the bank of the river. She appar- ently had slipped and fallen into an air hole In the ice covered stream. The search was imme- diately concentrated there. When police and volunteer searchers failed In their search, Carl Cause, Sr., Bobblnsdale, Minn., professional diver, was summoned. He located the body about COO feet below the spot where the child was believed'to have fallen in. prepared In the attorney general's its exports of dried eggs to Great office and then recalled before being [Britain. made public. Egg-drying plants selling to the Neither GoUtng nor the attorney government, it was announced, will general's office would say what required to certify thai they nicipality was Involved, but it producers not Jess than 33 understood to be a town near cents a" dozen during the February- neapolis. I April period. 7 Dead in Train Wreck Near Bakcrsfield, Calif. Bakcrsficld, Calif. Seven persons were known to have been killed, Coroner Norman Ilouzc said todny, nnd many others were Injured when a Southern Pacific JMSSCIIROI- train struck a broken rail 12 miles northwest of here cariy today. He added one or two more might have died in the .wreck. Deputy Coroner John Werts, also at the wreck scene, said hrce of the known dead are Women. Some of the bodies removed from the wreckage were badly ninnRlpd, naklng determination of the exact, number killed difficult. Kern county general hospital, where most of the injured wore jelng treated, estimated at 5 to 100, including those Jess scri- usly hurt. The dead Included these, tcnla- ivcly identified: James Lcroy Hall, Kansas City, Ao. Bessie Dlles, Richmond, Private Joseph Bernavich, Rich- mond, Calif. Youth Killed in Crash Near Decorah, Iowa Decorah, Iowa Merlin IX Erick.son, 20, was killed late night when his car skidded on ice, hit a bank and rolled over on the highway five miles north of Decorah. Ills neck was broken and his skull pierced, lie is a son of Oscar J. Krickiton. This was the first 1947 highway faullty in county.   

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