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Winona Daily News Newspaper Archive: August 21, 1972 - Page 1

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   Winona Daily News (Newspaper) - August 21, 1972, Winona, Minnesota                                Cloudy with chance of rain; cooler Tuesday 117th of Publication Winona Daily News BIIMW1L WINONA, MINNESOTA 55987, MONDAY, AUGUST 1 Sections, 18 Pages, 15 Cents GOP opens precise convention THEY'LL HELP OPEN GOP CONVENTION Boy and Girl Scouts carrying flags march into Miami Beach's Con- vention Hall Sunday in a rehearsal of the part they'll play during the opening ceremony of the Republican National Con- vention today. (AP Pholofax) 76 control ByCAflLP.LEUllSDORF MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (APj Republicans launch their precisely scheduled convention today to renominate President Nixon while party leaders seek to head off a floor fight over the shape of the 1976 convention. An afternoon meeting of welcoming speeches and a filmed tribute to the late President Dwight D. Eisenhower was to open the 1972 affair, followed by a night session featuring three keynote speeches lo hail accomplishments of (he Nixon adminislralion. everything programmed, down to Nixon's nom- ination Tuesday night, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's se- lection Wednesday night and final adjournment at p.m Wednesday, the Republican convention loomed as a sharp contrast to the all-night sessions and bruising floor fights lhat marked last month's Democratic Convention here. Only one issue appeared headed for a battle on the con- vention floor, the question of how delegates will be allotted by stales for the party's next convention in 1976. The convention's Rules Committee considers the ques- tion today. Unless a compromise can he reached, Ihc issue will be fought on the convention floor and before the nation's tele- vision viewers Tuesday afternoon in the only crack of the solid Republican unily marking the convention. Threat of another floor fight, over the women's rights portion of the party platform, all but vanished over Ihe week- end Rep. Margaret Heckler of Massachusetts said no woman on the platform tried lo bring up a statement on abortion. Even the protesters appeared to be following a well-or- dered schedule. Several hundred caused a massive traffic jam outside Ihe Fonlainebleau Hotel, scene of a {500-a-iieket, fancy-dress GOP ball. A few eggs were thrown and a few parly-goers were jostled but large numbers of night-slick- carrying police dispersed the demonstrators without injury or arrest. With no Republican opposition lo Nixon lo worry about, GOP leaders kept up a steady drumbeat of criticism of Democratic nominee George McGovern. Sen. Robert Dole of Kansas, Ihe parly chairman, charged Ihe South Dakota sena- tor had virtulaly destroyed "any chance for peace this year" in fndochina. McGovern, meanwhile, planned a departure from the usual practice of lying low during the opposition party's convention. He has a busy schedule for Ihe week, including a tour of Pennsylvania flood damage today, a visil to former Presi- dent Lyndon B. Johnsons ranch on Tuesday and a speed) before the American Legion convention in Chicago on Wed- nesday. As delegates arrived in Miami Beach, Dole added his voice to Ihe effort lo compromise the fight over the dele- gate-apportionment plan approved lasl week by the Repub- lican National Committee at the bequest ol smaller, more solidly Republican stales. At the center of Ihe light is the prospective 1976 candi- dacy of Agncw, who arrived in this sweltering convention city Sunday afternoon proclaiming "I'm keeping the op- lions open" on a possible presidential bid four years hence. Many of those from the larger stales who are fighting Ihe delegate-apportionment plan approved bv the national committee contend it would help Agncw by giving votes to states likely lo support him in 1976. Sunday night's gala, featuring Mrs. Nixon and the Presi- dent's two daughters, was only one of a large number of social events on Ihe schedule. "We don't look at this as a working convention as such." one New Hampshire delegate said. "Most of us will Two delegate challenges, affecting a single seal in New Mexico and two in Virginia, were before the convention's Credentials Committee. Neither challenge received a single vote when heard by thc national committee last week. One was Rep. Paul N. McCloskcy's effort to win seating of a New Mexico delegate who could argue his viewpoint on (lie convention floor. New .Mexico Republicans agreed to abide by lhe result of the stale's primary and cast one vote for Ihc California war critic but refused to let him have a delegate who might get up and make anti-Nixon speeches. The olhcr challenge involves Iwo seats in Ihe Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C. Thc formal convcnlion programs a mix between (he tra- ditional speech-making and a scries of films on the Nixons, (he administration and related subjects. One switch from the past is Ihe decision to have three keynote speakers instead of the usual one to extoll the party's virtues and flay the opposition's shortcomings. The three who .speak at tonight'.1; session are Son. Ed- ward W. iirooke of Massachusetts, (he only black member of the Senate; Anne Armstrong of Texas, cocbairman of the National Committee and the first female keynoter; and Mayor Richard Lugar of Indianapolis, who is being promo- ted by some Indiana politicians as 1907 presidential material. Floor fight predicted By JOHN BECKLER MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) A preliminary skirmish WEIS i slated for today in the con-' The fight for control of the ,Rules Committee, publican party in 1976 is swell-1 whlch wl11 clear a Plan for Pre- ing toward a convention floor j sentation to the convention showdown against the will afternoon. the GOP hierarchy. National parly Chairman Robert Dole pressed for a com- promise, but found his offers by both sides Sunday. The battle pits smaller and more conservative states against the more populous states, which In some cases prove to be strongholds for the parly's moderate elements. The triumphant side will gain head start on influencing the party's choice for president in 1976. to avoid a party fight that could bruise feelings and dimin- ish zeal for Nixon's re-election campaign. Dole was the first parly lead- i er to endorse the plan favoring The controversy involves the j the smaller states, and helped method of allocaling the 1976 convention delegates among lhe states. A plan approved by the Republican National Committee would give small, traditionally Republican slates a voting ad- vantage over Ihe more popu- lous Northeastern and Great Lakes states, which are back- ing a rival version. President Nixon reportedly is staying out of the fight. But many involved in it view Dole's efforts as an indication lhat Nixon's campaign leaders want push it through the national committee. Bui for the last two days he has been trying to bring the opponents into agree- ment. Big states object to the com- mittee approved plan chiefly because it would award bonus delegates to the 1976 convention only lo stales lhat Nixon car- ries this year. The plan backed by the bigger slates would base the bonus award on (he total Republican votes cast, whether or not Nixon carried the slate. McGovern: aged have been ignored by Nixon WASHINGTON (AP) _ Sen. George S. McGovern said today the Nixon administration has neglected the elderly "except when seeking their eleclion- year voles." "The Nixon-Agnew policy to- ward older Americans is a pol- icy of the Demo- cratic presidential nominee said. "It is a policy of hiding bad deeds words." behind brave After a day-long visil today to an area of Northeastern nated McGovern last and barred its doors month to the I Pennsylvania ravaged by June j mayor whose all-out backing could be a key factor in any floods, the candidate heads to Texas for a Tuesday meeting with former President Lyndon B. Johnson. Johnson lasl week broke si- lence on the nomination of i ticket i McGovern, whose rise lo na- j {rajncd" lional prominence was based almost solely on denunciation of Johnson war policies. McGovern commented in a The president, who in- so-called campaign "white pa- Vlled. McGovern to Ihe LBJ McGovern hopes to carry the crucial swing-state of Illinois. Daley since has said fie would vote for the Democratic but has re- en- Inside: Storms Storms that brought up (o 3W inches of tain, hail and strong winds swepl through the Winona area late Sun- day afternoon and early evening, leaving some pro- perty damage in their wake page 3a. More than sons Sunday devoured corn on the cob and barbecued chicken as Plainview, Minn., celebrated Corn on (he Cob and piclures, page 5a. Minnesota Republican Chairman David Krogseng said Sunday he is prepared to lead a floor fight over the selection of delegates to Ihe Republican National Con- page 9a. Disagree- ments be- tween the Democratic and Republican platforms are highlighted in the passages on Vietnam policy, amnesty for draft resisters and the busing of school children to achieve racial slory, page lOa. More than persons watch- ed Ihc grand parade Sunday afternoon as the Wis., Beef and Dairy Days celebration came to an end pictures and slories, page Ib. Plainview Krogseng Platforms Fete LINE OK POLICE Helmetcd police line up in front of the Fonlaineblcau Hotel in Miami Beach Sunday evening as studenl aclivisls tried lo disrupt a Republican gala where President Nixon's wife and daughters were the guesls of honor. The demonstrators were dispersed peacefully by ths police. (AP Pholofax) Demonstrators attempt to stop pre-convention gala By TERRY RYAN- MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) Police and protesters got ac- An "Honor America" parade .guests arriving in tuxedoes and i Collective. "We made our and a "dishonor Amerika" ral- formal gowns. point. We were not intimidated ly occupied attention earlier About 200 helmeterl stair.. by the cops. We've gol three quainled across a line of nighl- Sunday. So did a marijuana Iroopers slood shoulder-to-i days and have to build." sticks on the eve of the re- j smoke-in, an anti-Nixon rock shoulder in front of the hotel as Some 200 members of publican National Convention'opera and the bodily ejection' early arrivals elbowed their as demonstrators capped a day I from the park of a contingent: way (hrough the jeering pro- nf drool ufilrm u'itr. ,i. [rorn the American Nazi Party.-testers. After an hour, Ihe But the day's only real con-j troopers moved slowly forward fronlalion came at nightfall, and forced the demonstrators when some 350 members of the i away from the premises. Students tor a The demonstrators gave of street action with an at tempted disruption of a GOP gala. Sunday was, however, clearly a day of preparation for both Ihe Miami Gay Activist Alliance, a group supporting equal righls for homosexuals, conducted the. most peaceful protest of the day. Carrying candles, they walked on the sidewalks lo Con- vention Hall, sal briefly in a sides. j Society marched in front of the ground, pounding on roofs and demonstration area 'in'front' of Only a fraction of the assem-: plush Fonlainebleau Hotel just i hoods of cars as they retreated.! it Ihen returned in- _ _ ___I _ f _ p.., ________il___ml___ ____1 _ n 1U" cident (o the campsite. The "Honor America" pa- rade, organized by a local polit- bled protesters and a small i as party faithful were gather- Then, proclaiming victory, they band of police participated in ing for a S500-a-plale gala, j began the two-mile southbound Sunday's main event. j President Nixon's wife and trek back to Flamingo Park. Most of the demonstra- daughters guests of honor Police reported no arrests j ical candidate, wound through jtors remained in Flamingo already were inside. no injuries. The only casu-llhe .slrecls in 95-degree heat [Park while the National; Chanting "keep the rich i allies apparently were egg-] with few participant and fewer Guard troops and Army the demonstrators burned an! splattered dinner jackets, scut- 1 spectators. 'paratroopers stood by in their American flag, locked arms at: fed salin slippers and lorn ball j encampments, but were never [he hotel entrances and har- gowns. called. angucd and joslled dinner This was the first lime at ci- dorsing AIcGovern. Accusing the Nixon adminis- tration of engaging in a "Dance of the Seven the Systematic bombing released as the South Da-1rancn. said he supported the j McGovern white paper listed kota senator began a four-day cantiidate but would reserve j seven areas of what it called swing that will take him across the right lo disagree with him. sname and ncglect lhe' Quang Tri City destroyed mis was me nrst time ai ci- -r- i ther of the Iwo conventions that OniCjnl S nonparticipants had been caught up in a confrontation he- GVGDtS tween police and demonslra- lors. The police had held fast in their ranks despite the urging iof bystanders to intervene. Ihe country across whatever hurdles re- main to whole-hearted support from Uvo important Old Guard Democrats. McGovern on Wednesday is (elderly, to meet in Chicago their first encounter since the j cent hike Democratic convention nomi- benefits. By PETER ARNETT TRI, Vietnam (AP) As efficiently as a heel said the adminis-! grinds out a smouldering ciga- a 20 have the South in Social Security and (he North with SDS's Miami City might number 600 men at most, "We waited until Ihr-y wore Both sides are systematically! the marines say. Some sit in-, assaulting people and could once-pleasant side the walled Citadel in the walt rn Of ihc re_: Chief Rocky Pomerance. "Our ;nough food' and' approach was lo protect people, for two years no1 hurt anyone, not arrest any- II is an orgy of destruc- left behind in May by the flee- onc-" crushcd'The lhat has Parallel in the Soulh Vietnamese infantry. "Those people are going to crushed the life from Quang In i v.etnam war The North Vietnamese also have a llttle indigestion The vistas of tumbled, broken hold five strongpoints in the I Martin an homes of steel rods slicking south of the city, formerly organizer grotesquely from twisted for headquarters Crete walls, of hollow-eyed, elements of the South Vietnam- crouching men are from earlier' ese armv- Tllc defense include wars. Quang Tri today is Seoul stout demonstration hunkers in 1950, Cassino in 1944, the bullt by the IS Cannes three towns and villages of Europe icars wiped out in World War I. H progress can be measured by 10 yards advance today, A pall of black smoke hangs' (nen back five tomorrow, or a over the city, like that over an j wnole block gained bv a baltal- Amencan industrial town in the jon jn three weeks after taking days before anyone bothered j m the South MIAMI BEACH. Fla. r.TI- Schedule for tonight's ses- sion of the Republican Na- tional Convention. 7iM p.m. (CDT) Open- ing ceremonies; .keynote., speeches hy Sen. Edward Brooke of Massachusetts, Mayor Richard Lugar of In- ilianapolis and Anne Arm- strong, co-cliairman of the. Republican Com- mittee; filmed tribute lo Mrs. Richard Nixon; ad- journment p.m. South Viet troops launch huge drive By GEORGE ESPEI! westward from fire Base Bal- SAIGON (AP) Three thou-idy was slowed by modcrale about pollution. But here the: Vietnamese are making prog- .sand South Vietnamese troops North Vietnamese resistance only industry is war. ress in Quang Tri. j launched a drive today aimed I and the long-range artillery The South Vietnamese ma-i 1 at blocking a North Vietnamese! fire. rines inside Quang Tri the comiminiMs measure division from pushing out of the By noon, the South Vietnam- taken well over casualties Progress by delaying the BOV- ,urcd Sm csc M advanccd ,0 ,hc ,h in 2o days at a conservative es- ernment advance for a mte' "r viscrs say. The Vietnamese few Sflulh victtlanVs bus of lh val, and b t knows how many dead then coastal sou.h of Da paratroopers before them were' Hanoi no doubt is satisfied casualties. Young officers No one wants to go forward from the Thu Due Officers' five miles from the fallen Nang. strongpoints of Fire Base Ross The Norlh the Que Son district head- graduating through the valley dur- quarters. ing the weekend, inflicting One South Vietnamese rcgi or hack nnlv tn rrmirli .mrinr a fi mmuuiig uiie oouin Vietnamese rcgl- wall and Tan forth? hnnm of Scho0' near Saigon fcar going'heavy troop and equipment ment which had been defending loSSOS a distant gun firing, and the lo cru-ump as the shell screams into the city. At least so fierce there, they say, lhat ll ,was biggest communist man could not survive to live sincc Quang Tri fell last May 1 and posed an immediate DEVASTATED Caught in the pincers of grinding war- fare, Quang Tri City is being systematically reduced lo rubble by the South Vielnamese, the North Vietnamese and the Amer- icans. Here, smoke rises from recent air strike on enemy position hidden among the shattered remnants of the city. (AP Pholofax) Tri. The war is on the South Vietnamese. Kire Base Ross was declared combat ineffective with at least 22 mon killed, 130 wounded and scores of others scattered anil missing. not counting from to QuarS Tri' Just'try's second largest city, and a For the third successive day, air strikes launched against the as lhc othcr of'icers come ncavily populated 50-mile strip [U.S. B.i2 heavy bombers swept North Vietnamese ,soutl1 (rom Hanoi- Thcir destiny i of Highway 1 to the South. over the valley to attack North l seems to be lo die in a dead j Field reports said thc Sotilh shells bwn; into Quang ery day, thev say. Anrt lhat is But lh.c offleers S''H threat lo Da .Nang, the coun- At any one lime thai enemy [cily, yietnatrose counter-advance Vietnamese troop concentra- tions and staging areas.   

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