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Winona Daily News: Tuesday, July 29, 1969 - Page 1

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   Winona Daily News (Newspaper) - July 29, 1969, Winona, Minnesota                                Fair to Partly Cloudy and a Little Warmer WINONA DAILY NEWS TOMORROW SUN RISES SETS NEW MOON AUG. 13 114th of Publication WINONA, MINNESOTA 55987, TUESDAY, JULY 29, 1969 TEN CENTS PER COPY Livestock Scale Wanted Classified Section J SECTIONS JO PAGES Billion Budget Surplus Is Discovered WASHINGTON U) The Nixon administration, suddenly and perhaps with hit of em- barrassment, has surprisingly found the federal governmenl had (3.1 billion budget jurplus last year. The bonana, which came aft monlhs nf administration predictions that Ihc surplus would be. less then a billion riol lars, resulted from income tha was higher and outlays tha were lower lhan Ihc fledgling administration expected las January. Preliminary figures, issued Monday by the Treasury De- partment and Bureau of the Budget, showed roimded-off re- ceipts of hillion and out- lays of billion for fiscal year 1969, which ended June 30. The surplus caused some Democrats in the Senate to comment that the administra- tion's case for extending the In- come tax surcharge had been weakened. Sen. John J. Williams, RDel., t leading supporter of exten- sion, said (he administration is using a new budget basis which counts things as Social Security payments. Without the change, he said, there would have been a deficit. The most puzzling clement of the unexpectedly large surplus was why there was no advance notice. As late as last week, Un- dersecretary of the Treasury Charles E. Walker predicted a surplus of "a little mora than a billion." DURING VIETNAM VISIT Report Nixon, Thieu To Confer Wednesday SHOW OF HANDS President Nixon responds to a show of hands at the U. S. Embassy in Bangkok where a large crowd of American residents nf the Thai capital gathered Tuesday for the visiting U.S. chief executive. (AP Photolax) BANGKOK (AP) President Nixon will visit South Vietnam Wednesday and confer with President Nguyen Van Thieu, responsible sources reported to- day. Details of Nixon's visit to the war zone were shrouded in secu- rity precautions, and White House spokesmen would give no confirmation. But neither would I hey deny the report. It was expected that the Pres- ident would he in Vietnam only 25-Df TECTIVE TASK FORCE FORMED Intensify Michigan Search ANN ARBOR, Mich, on A special task force of 25 detec- tives from five police agencies today mounted an intensified search for the killer or killers of seven young women slain over the past two years. Formation of the task force was the latest move in a manhunt which in re- cent days has included: unsuccessful attempt to (rap the killer of the latest vic- tim by placing a department story dummy at the site where her body was found. posses scouring the woodlands around Ann Ar- bor and Ypsilanti in search of clues to the spot where the girl was killed. computerized search for a mysterious young motorcyclist with whom the latest victim, Karen Sue Bcineman, 18, an Eastern Michigan University freshman, was last seen. Miss Beineman's nude and battered body was found Satur- day night, more than three days after she disappeared. She was the eighth young woman slain In the Ann Arbor- Ypsilanli area in the past two years and the seventh in a string of unsolved and possibly related killings. A laborer has been charged in one of the eight killings and po- lice have discounted his possible role in the other seven. William F. Delhey, Washten- aw County prosecutor, in charge of coordinating the manhunt, said the task force consists of detectives from the police de- partments of Ann Arbor, Ypsi lanti, Eastern Michigan Univer sity, the Michigan Stale Police and the Washtenaw Count; Sheriff's department. The detectives will also hav 25 administrative workers as signed to help them. Delhey said an attempt t trap Miss Beineman's killer Sa' urday by placing a deparlmen store mannequin where he body was found had been unsui ccssful. twice visited Arhcrican bases in Thailand and Vietnam, stopping each time in Vietnam at the ul- tra-secure American base at It was believed that Nixon would prefer some other slop- ing place, perhaps even Sai- ;on. This would impose extra iccurity precautions, but with he war in a lull, it was believed that a visit to the South Viet- namese capital was possible. The President's second day in few hours. Meanwhile, Nixon's tup mill- ary and diplomatic officials in aigon flew to Bangkok today to cnmTa'nh cvicw the situation in Vietnam 'ith the President. Amid conferences on South- ast Asian security with the eadcrs of Thailand, Nixon cheduled an up-fp-the-minutc eview of the war with U.S. Am- assador Ellsworth Bunker and 3en. Creighton Abrams Jr., (he ommandcr of U.S. forces in Vietnam. Nixon has said these talks would influence his thinking on urlher withdrawals of U.S roops and his assessment of the significance of the battlefield ull in Vietnam, now in its sixth week. Nixon's published schedule for Wednesday is blank until the evening, when Prime Minister Thanom Kittikachorn gives dinner for the President and Mrs. Nixon. White House spokesmen and American military sources re- mained silent on the possibility of a Vietnam trip during the day, but there were no denials of the rising speculation. There was also possibility that Nixon would drop in on one of the six big U.S. bases in Thai- land to speak to the troops. President Lyndon B. Johnson Bangkok began with i visit from Gen. Jesus M. Vargas, Philippine secretary genera) o< the Southeast Asia Treaty Or- ganization. Then Nixon to Government House and met with Prime Minister Thanom, Foreign Minister Thanat Kho- man, and Air Marshal Chullasapya, one of the most powerful members of Thailand'i governing military clique. Significance of Flight Felt by Apollo Crewmen HUMPHREY SAYS ABM Doesn't Bother Soviets WASHINGTON (AP) _ Hu-' bert H. Humphrey jays Soviet leaders indicated to him much more concern about American development of offensive mis- siles than deployment of the Safeguard antimissile system. The 1968 Democratic presi- dential nominee said in an inter- view after a 13-day visit to the Soviet Union the Russians "are less concerned about the ABM than about our offensive weap- ons, the MIRVS (multiple targetable re-entry The former vice president said he favors continued re- search on the Safeguard ABM but opposes deployment. Senate opponents have con- tended ABM deployment might cause the Russians to shun arms limitation talks. "The ABM is only he said. "If we step up our de- fenses, they feel they have to step up their offensive weapons. But it is our offensive missiles that worry them most." He said Russian concern over differences with China and their own economic and social needs requires them to think in ;erms of a belter relationship with the United are open to discussions." But be added: "Russia is mora Russian than communistic and it moves slow- ly. There are contesting forces at work. There is a power strug- gle and no une can predict what will happen.1' On other matters, Humphrey said he is "seriously consider- ing" returning to the political wars by seeking election to the Senate from Minnesota next year. Humphrey said he discussec the American position on inter- national cooperation in space the Middle East, Vietnam ant arms control with Soviet Pre mier Alexei Kosygin. In lalks with scientists, Sovici editors and others, Humphrey said he found universal interest in reaching an agreement in arms control talks. Battlefield Strategy Is Modified ON GUARD An Eastern Michigan biology professor is watched over by her Ger- man Shepherd dog as she takes a break from classes in Ypsilanti. Coed Karen Beineman's battered body was found Saturday, the eighth young woman found murdered in the Ypsi- lante-Ann Arbor area in two years. (AP Pho- tofax) HOUSE MOVE IS BLOCKED Surtax Extension Showdown Ahead WASHINGTON (AP) _ A fast approaching congressional showdown over extension of the present income tax withholding rates may decide the fate of President Nixon's surtax. House leaders tried Monday to put through a 15 day exten- sion of (he withholding rates to include the 10 per cent surtax levy, but were blocked by a par- liamentary move. Another attempt to get a vote Predicts Drop In Beef Prices WASHINGTON A lop Nixon administration farm economist prcdicls con- sumers soon may be paying less for beef, but some in- dustry spokesmen say the day of per pound round steak is gone forever. Dr. Don chief economist for the Depart- ment of Agriculture, said he sees hope for a cooling of retail prices as the result of cattle prices dropping troni their early June peak which was an 18-year rec- ord. "The price lias come down ,at Ihe farm level and sometimes those things don't work us promptly as Ihcy should but my anti- cipation would he that we'd see, and have seen, some rcaclion on Ilic retail mar- Paarlberg said in an interview. Contrary forecasts cams from an industry spokes- man, declining to be iden- tified, who said retailers will not drop prices signi- ficantly because of what he sees as small or short-term declines in live cattle prices. "Really, 1 rlon'l think anybody in this connlry can ever again expect to see round steak again, and ccr- Ininly not less lhan about for the indus- try man said. Last December consum- ers paid an average, of a pound for choice sirloin steak. In June, after months nf rising cattle prices, the snmc meal cosl Mrs. Aver- age Housewife m the resolution was planned Mansfield was not encouraging or today or Wednesday. The urtax expired June 30, but Con- gress previously extended the )ay check withholding rales hroiigh midnight Thursday. A bill passed by the House nd approved by the Senate Fi- nance Committee would contin- ue the ]0 per cent surtax the fi- nal six months of this year and lower it to 5 per cent for the first six months of 1970. Even if the withholding exten- sion clears the House, it could run into trouble in the Senate where Republicans are. seeking lime In negotiate with Demo- crats for action on (he surtax it- self. But the response Monday by Senate Democratic leader Mike to the administration. He said he would be reluctant to bring up the 15-day withhold- ing resolution unless the Repub- licans, including top administra- tion officials, would agree to a compromise package worked out in the Senate Democratic Policy Committee. This called for a five-month surcharge extension while the Senate works on a big tax re- form bill now being drafted in the House Ways and Means Committee. The Republicans rejected this last week and rcslatcd (heir ar- gument Monday (hat a full year's extension is cssi-ntial to fight inflation. Mansfield replied lhat the siir tax was getting more and more unpopular on his side of the aiste. And he said if the with- holding rales are not extended by Thursday, it seemed likely the surtax would die and be be- yond resurrection. Other Democrats, supporting his argument, said the sur- charge had been incffeclive in Ihe fight against inflation any- way. Some Democrats said they felt the largcr-than-oxpccted fis- cal 1969 budget surplus an- nounced Monday made the case for the surtax somewhat weak- er. The surplus was reported at billion, hillion more SAIGON (AP) U.S. com- manders in Vietnam have modi- fied their battlefield strategy of "maximum pressure" in recent weeks to a strategy of limited response tp enemy tactics, U.S. sources said today. Termed "protective reac- (he new strategy is de- signed to hold U.S. casualties down and dates from about the time (he current battlefield lull began nearly six weeks ago. "We are not abandoning the maximum pressure concept, but this certainly does represent a change in Baid one source. The new strategy is being ap- plied primarily in the 3rd Corps tactical zone which include Sai- gon and the 11 provinces around it, the area in which most of the fighting has occurred since the lull began June 18. The sources said that one im- portant aspect of the shift in strategy is (hat while reconnais- sance and ambush patrols and other small units are continuing to circulate freely in the field, large-scale forces are now dis- patched only in response to in- telligence data that indicates good chance of meeting the ene- my. Meanwhile, U.S. troops swept a familiar battleground north- west of Saigon today in search of North Vietnamese stragglers from the sharpest fight the Americans have reported in more lhan a month. The U.S. Command said 3 en- emy soldiers were killed in a lightning-like pinccr thrust Mon- day into the often contested SPACE CENTER, Houston Wi The Apollo H moon- men have been reflecting on the significance of their mo- mentous mission and (ha place they will take in his- tory, a spokesman quaran- tined with them reports. "As you know, they are not outspoken he said. "But they feel the significance of what they have done." John McLeaish, public af- fairs officer for the Nation- al Aeronautics and Space Administration, told a news conference this Monday night. McLeaish is one of 14 per- sons lodged in the lunar receiving laboratory here with Neil A. Armstrong, Ed- win E. Aldrin Jr. and Mi- chael Collins. They will he released from quarantine Aug. II if they have not developed any illness and if nothing harm- ful has been found in the rocks they brought back from the moon. The rocks, collected by Armstrong and Aldrin when they explored the lunar surface July 20, are being examined in an- other section of the labora- tory. The astronauts today con- clude what is known as a "first blush'1 debriefing in which they report general Impressions of things that occurred during the eight day mission. Generally, they discuss operations o( various spacecraft tems. On Thursday tha moon- men meet with key Apollo officials to begin several days of more detailed dis- cussions. McLeaish said that Mon- day they discussed the lunar orbit and landing phases of the flight. Armstrong reported engine of the lunar Eagle kicked up consider, able dust as it settled ia for a touchdown. This reduced visibility but did not jeo- pardize the landing. "It was not McLeaish said of the dust. He also reported Arm- strong and Aldrin talked about the near-landing in a rock-filfed crater, which had been reported earlier. Arm- strong said the automatia controls had them zeroed in on the craggy area and be took manual control of the Eagle to steer to i smoother spot a half-mili away. The astronauts also re- ported that working in tha moon's one-sixth gravity field was much easier than working in zero G or trw weightless world of an or- biting ship. "They reported one dis- MacLeish said. "It tended to produce mus- cular laziness." Doctors reported the as- tronauts continued in excel- lent health. Confenfmenf "And why shouldn't cows he asks Taffy Tutllc. "They're surround- ed by that high-priced beef" When you're choosing a wife (says the cynic) try to imagine how she'd look if she didn't have blonde hair Definition of a locomotive: The only thing that's not afraid of a teenager is a hot rod Sometimes it's the guy with cold feet who has enough sense to slay out of hot wa- ler. area known as the Citadel. It is 25 miles from Saigon. U.S. officers said documents found afterward indicated the fight spoiled plans for a series of attacks on American palrol and artillery bases. The 25th Infantry Division threw more lhan troops along with tanks and armored personnel carriers into Ihe day- long fight. Three Americans were killed lhan the April. estimates made in and H wounded, the U.S. Com- I niand reported. (For more laughs see Earl Wilson on Page   when her car collided with a Iruck on Highway 50 ncflr Dela Portugal Rejects J.N. Censure LISBON (AP) Portugal ejected a U.N. Security Council censure charging that twd per- ons in a Zambian village June 30 In an air attack rom (he Portuguese territory of Mozambique. The Foreign Ministry said Jn i communique Monday night .hat "there are no sddress any kind of against Portugal, because Zam- bia's complaints have been dii- proved" during the U.N, "On the com- munique said, "Porlugal'i ille- gations against Zambia proved and not denied in (he curity Council." Portugal claims Zambia It providing sanctuary to African rebels fighting fcfrccs in Mozambique and An- gola. African and Asian sponsored the censure resolu- tion, and Ihc Security Council approved it Monday 11-0, tin United States, Britain, and Spain abstained. WEATHER KKOEKAL KOHKCAST WINONA AND VICINITY Fair lo parlly cloudy and Mariner 6 'Stores' First Mars Telecast little warmer through Wednes- day. tonight M62; high Wednesday R2-SR. Outlook Thursday: Temperatures a lit- PASADENA, Calif, m start transmitting the pictures Mariner 6 has clicked its earner- .is at Mars, snapping ami slor- ing (or transmission lo eailh lo- night the first 33 of a long series of pictures which may show lie above normal with chance of i iifc can oxist 011 ,hc planet, The space probe look its firsl Ihumlershowcrs, LOCAL WEATHKU Official observations for Ihc U hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 83; minimum, 58; noon, HO; precipitation, none. photograph al p.m. COT Monday. Scicnlisls said Ihc camera was working well. wJrich activated Ihe cameras Mariner G was scheduled toj.ilso stalled instruments de- more lhan million milrs io e.irlh at p.m. loitay. Vice President Spiro T. Ag- new, who as head of Ihe Presi- dent's Spare Advisory Council advocates manned exploration of Mars, arranged lo be al Ihe Jcl Propulsion Laboratory to watch the photographs come in. The same, radio commands signed to measure the surface temperature of Mars and to analyze the chemical make-up of its Ihin alrao.sph.crc. The quality of Ihe initial pie- lures will not he known until they reach carlh. A spokesman said Monday night that signals from the spacecraft indicated the camera plalform was prop- erly aimed, that light was enter- ing Ihe lens, and lhat a pielurc was being recorded on tape. Mariner R carries a small computer which converls the lifiht and dark arpar. of a scene inlo nmnuers. The numbers, representing Ihe dots on a tele- vision screen, are slorrd on tape for later transmission to the lab- oratory here, where a computer translates them into an image. The first sequence of 33 pic- lures, lakon at distances rang- ing from 771.5W to Wiles disc of Ibe They are expected to have lit- tle more detail than pholo- grajihs made with carlh tele- scopes, bill will show all phase.! of the planet as it rotates during Ihe spacecraft's approach. Much sharper pictures, with details as small as 300 fcf.t across, are in be taken Wednes- day night as Mariner fi flici (rom Mars, will show the full] within miles of Mars.   

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