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Winona Daily News: Friday, January 25, 1963 - Page 1

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   Winona Daily News (Newspaper) - January 25, 1963, Winona, Minnesota                               Continued Cold, Snow Late Tonight Or Saturday WINONA DAILY NEWS TOMORROW SUN RISES SETS NEW MOON JAN. 25 108th of Publication WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1963 TEN CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Senate Opens Cuban Arms Buildup Quiz Cold Clings to Much of Country Soviet Hold ___Strengthened, Aitkin States Crops in Deep South threatened i By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Winter's longest and worst siege of cold weather clung to much of the nation today, causing a sharp rise in the death toll and i Ihrcalening damage to crops in ithe Southland. The huge cold air mass cov-: c-red most of the country from Ihe! Rockies to the Atlantic Coast. It i j knifed deep into (he South, where I lowest temperatures of the cen-; liiry were recorded in some areas I Thursday. There was promise of moder- i atiug temperatures in some sec- lions of Ihe hard-hit midconlinent. [But another stream of cold air i hearted from Canada into north- ern Midwest regions. The coldest weather, with read- i ings ranging from zero lo 1G be- IOT, extended from northern Ten- nessee northeastward into the Northeast in Ihe Upper Jlississip. I pi Valley, northern sections of the j Middle .Mississippi Valley and in inoit of (he northern plains. Tem- peratures, generally, were not as low as Thursday morning, hull were far below normal levels in many areas. Since the outbreak of the cur- rent cold weather earlier Ihis week al least 112 deaths have been reported from exposure, as- phyxiation, over-exertion in snow, fires and in traffic accidents on ice-covered highways. bitter cold also has forced By ANTHONY WHITE t Yugoslavia. Turkey. Bulgaria and'the closing of thousands of LONDON' i killer parts of Ihe Soviet Union were bit j schools, the shutdown of some in winter, which already has laken more than 200 lives, showed signs WASHINGTON .Sen. Oorce IX Aikfii. R-VI.. afler a briefing j hy Secretary of Stale Dean Husk, said loday the Soviets have an "enor- i mously strong military and political base in Cuba" and it is growing stronger. Aikcn declined to discuss what Husk and John A. McCone, Central Intelligence Agency director had told a Senate Foreign Relations sub- i committee at the elosed-door meeting. Hut, lie said, "I think Russia Iniilt nn enormously strong mili- jlary and political base in Cuba, much stronger than it was six months FIREMAN OR SNOWMAN? Bob Douglas, who along with firemen of five city fire companies fought a fire in 10 below zero weather which destroyed the old Fose Marie restaurant in Bay City, looked more like a snowman than a fireman but probably didn't think it very humorous at the time. 'AP Photofax) Europe's Killer Winter Milder FIRST WITNESSES Secretary of Stale Dean Husk and Director John McCone of the Central Intelligence' Agency, pose today with senators before the slart of a hearing on whelher Cuba is slopping up mililary mighL The hear- ing is being held behind closed doors by Ihe Sen- ate Latin American Affairs Subcornmillec on For- eign Relations. From left are: Sen. Wayne Morse, IJ-Ore., subcommittee chairman; Sen. William Fiilbrighl. D-Ark., head of the full Foreign Rein- lions Committee; Rusk and McCone. (AP Photo- fax) De Gaulle's Doubt U.S. Would Aid Irks Kennedy "The strengthening of this lary-polilical fortress is continu- ing." President Kennedy has laid there ins been no new military buildup n Cuba. Bill despite this assertion by Ihe 'resident at his news conference Thursday, several Republican sen- ilnrs remain skeptical. And de- spite his renewed assumption of rcsixiiisihilily for failure of the j 1 Bay of Pigs invasion, there I s nn slowing of a Republican drive for an independent investi- gation of (be fiasco. Kennedy's appraisal of the state of Prime Minister Fidel Castro's irsennl rnnlradicls reports Sen. Kenneth B. Kraling, R-N.Y.. and nlliors say they have received. Tlic-ir claim is that Caslro has iceii getting additional weapons and is now militarily much strong- er than he was six months ago. These reports prompted Chair- man Wayne Morse, D-Ore.. lo call Rusk and Cenlral Intelligence Agency representatives before his Latin-American affairs subcom- mittee for closed-door testimony. In his session with newsmen, Kennedy dealt also wilh Ihe nag- ging question of whether air sup- of slackening its grip on parts of northern Europe. In Denmark, West Germany The southern fringes of Ihe il WBS warmer. tinent still reeled'under almosl lotall-v sno'.vboundj blizzards and intense cold thai left for more than a expected 'oro.aslers t fresh Irai) of floods, wreckage and death from the Atlanlic to the Black Sea. By JOHN M. WASHINGTON' HIGHTOWER (APi-President as winter's fury concentrated plants and a slump in soulh. business. Travel by train, plane, bus and aulo was disrupted. fl r. pots were started in the iroves of Florida after predicted possible ,u, u T IJJVllUUlr mill JLUl.lC.'di a slight thaw within 24 hours. freezlnS weather. However, it ap-1 TllpH prwjtlclrt Britons continued struggle with snow, ice, freezing fog, fuel peared that the icy air would not extend into the rich Everglades, farming area in (lie southern part j Kennedy was reported today lo have been deeply irritated by the accusation made by President Cbarlcs de Gaulle o! France lhat ithe llniled States cannot be de- jpcndcd upon to defend Western j Europe with nuclear weapons. a news con- ference Thursday that such an ar- gument "is inaccurate" and not really in the interest of Ihe West- ern alliance. He declared that the United States has "never had the slightest doubt that Gen. DC Gaulle would respond lo the needs of the alliance." and added sharply: "I would that our confi- dence in him would be matched by his confidence in us." Kennedy said that although ev- eryone might not U.S. commitment believe in to defend Dunlap Cites Question on School Problem Spain, Portugal, Italy, shortages, cuts in electricity Mrmmf; are; gas, and thousands of burst slale- majns It was freezing again in north Authorities planned a 4.000- j ern sections of Florida, truck coal lift during the weekend Jm Tallahassee and 27 in to get fuel from pitheads to almost out of The death toll in Britain from with 22 j fackson-) ville. Headings were rero to Si abnve in Kentucky and Tennessee! and 10 to in most other parts the cold stood unofficially at more of lne Southeast except Florida than 100. Yugoslavia reported 29iwnere temperatures in the north Chimney Blocked, Fumes Kill Pair By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS i freezing, in their (irelcss home rope, "1 believe that Chairman Khrushchev does, and I think he is To some at Ihe news confer ence, Kennedy seemed In display indignation as he asserted lha Ihe United Stales would "defen( Europe by whatever means are necessary." Informants said later that the President was deeply ir port had been exile invaders. planned for Ihe Greece 3 and Turkey ST. (API al rcdistricting and Congression- a slate law providing that no congressional district may have more than one member on the State Board of Ed- ucalion have apparently crested I wo vacancies on Ihe board. Sen. Robert Dunlap o[ Plainview chairman of Ihe Senate Commit- tee on Education, called attention to (he situation at a meeting of his committee lod'ty. The re- apnoinlment of L. Lyman llunlley for recommenda- 111 Li it Lg in: l Lit It ACXUUIIn. r -j -----i... _ ;ished in fumes from an ice-blocked jlures continued to grip Minnesota. In the Lower Rio j chimney and an ill Brainerd man; Two Willinar racji had n close Inched above 'e-v Texas, a cloud cover was j and his mother were found, near j brush with death earlier in Ihe day freezing in western Belgium, to give some protection Gaulle had made at a Paris news conference last week in support n( his decision that France must go on building its own .nuclear weapons force. In defiance of De Gaulle's stand for a French national nuclear announced inline he said, "H you are going to have United Slates cover, you might as well have a complete United States commit- cut, which would have meant a full-fledged invasion." He stressed that at no time did (he United Stales plan lo use its own planes lo fly missions over Hie invasion beach. What was talked about, Kenne- dy continued, was an air strike by nulmoded B2S bombers fldwn rilated hy the argument which DC by pilots not based in Ihe United Stales. This was delayed from Only One Ship Carried Arms, Kennedy Says By FRANK CORMIER WASHINGTON'   "thc was a fnil. rests Dead at Starbuck were Mr. and illrs. Louis each 86 Pope i saKl lhnl Frcnch "re. and the responsibility County officials said 10 inches o! fwcil as "'hers would; wilh Ihe While House." See had formed around Ibe mela) i Kennedy's explanalinn failed lo leap of a tile chimney, trapping head the lask fnrce Kennedyidelei Scnale Republican Leader 1 fumes from an oil healer and as- Ambassador Livingslon T.; Kvcrcli M. Dirksen of Illinois in WASHINGTON' LivincIphyxialing the pair. Slcnson's body retirement. Mcr-lhis pursuit of an independent in- cost s. as mcasured nv the found in a chair, his wife's (ls.a undersecretary vesligalinn of the mailer. B l-' slalc m Lisrahnvi-cr admin- Dirksen nairt he Ihouglil il nec- flaly's Lebanon, N.H., -4 in Maine: -7 in Bing- Iry lay under more than three feel] hamlon, N.Y., and -4 in Provi- Tiadio reports from Bulgaria 'lf', dicaled a major crisis as Ihe conn-! of snow. 'deuce, H.I., and Worcester, Mass. i Chicago had its sixlh straight day Other Greek army units battled iol subzero cold, high winds and 10-fool snoiv drifts j Tiie weather was clear in most as they tried to open Greece's na-i sections of the country. However, lional highway, from Salonika to snow fell in Ihe Greal Lakes re- Athens. The Greek capita! a-vokc] jiion, southern New England, lhc lo its first snow in years, 4 inches of it. Dunlap said Huntley't reap- poiiitnicnt apparently would be il- legal because ledistricling put him and Brynolf Pelcrson of Ait- kin both in the 8lh District, Peter- son, whose term expires in 1965, formerly represented lhc Glh Dis- Iricl on Ihe board. Advised of this situation. Gov. i Elmer L. Andersen said thc effect j of redislricting on Ihe hoard had, been overlooked, but thai rcsludy turner! up another similar silua- i lion. This involves Walter 0. Lund- berg of Austin, who.se term ex- pires this year, and Frank .1. Pt-lrieh of Soulh St. Paul, both now in the 1st District. Pelrich's term expires in WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST WIXOXA AND VIClNlTY-Most- ly fair lonighl. Variable cloudiness wilh scattered snow flurries urday, possibly beginning laic lo- nighl. lonight 5 tp 15 below, high Saturday zero. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for (he 2 hours ending at 12 m. today: .Maximum 5: minimum, -H noon, precipitation, none. AIRPORT WEATHER (North Central Observations) _ .........rj Max. temp. 3 al J p.m. Tliurs- j from Cciba'n Prime Alini'sTcr Fidel about northern Plains anil Ihe northern Itockies. largest decline for any month I livity at Ihe Ed Xovoloey home, in four years. 1 Investigating officers found N'ovot- Reporting (his loday. H: bal'cl-v ahlc "awl lo menl officials caulioncd   'lucstions: wishes (or an early end lo news- Tribune ionc "l 'e Wl Kon': do know" paper .strikes Cleveland and jnoiine. gone lo hislon-: about wbal is going on in ruha. I New York. In the case of the. New cal are working m favor "Under our controlled news pol- York walkout, he hopes hr.th sides of Hie imiitralion of HVstern I-.ii-1icy." he added. "I think we are'will "reach Ihe compromise whieh rope m par.nersnip wilh the our intelligenceiuilimalcly they are goinn to reach cd Stalls. dors know" anyway." mar Thursday with R..I. Samuel son. employed by Weslern Fruil Kxprcss. lo gel pictures of ice bar- By JOE MCGOWAN JR. nn the orders of Dr. Benning MIAMI. Fla. (API Another Mi.ami whr) rotic Cuban refugees, many paie. from seasickness after a night on; loday i llhe vessel hot fond before leai'ing Cuba. "This is like emerging from The iwo walked onto an area covered hy windblown snow, un- aware thai lhc drifts covered a spot where ice had been harvested only the day before. Thc snow blanket had kept Ihe ice from j forming any but a Ihin layer and Whisenanl and S through il. and Samuolson plunged in the llniled States. American freighlcr j I-ykes brnught Ihem (o Port Ever- Cuba in exchange for she Bay of 'glades, Ihe porl of Fort Lander-i Pigs captives who were released which they had sacrificed all j A slalf of Red Cross nurses had Iheir material possessions. worked through the night adminis- Many were old. in poor lo the sick, most of whom lion, and lorn by conflicling emo- were stricken by seasickness, lie- lions, They were happy Ip escape cause her load was light, and she. jjj rolled badly in dungeon inlo fresh air." said Fe-! Nearby ice-cull ing cren.s res- The Shirley Lvkes brouoht the l'alour..I nnc of the two by extending long Lyxes brouaht lUe ..lhcrc ]s hllngcr in for jusl an Cuba and no freedom. We arc- going to them. lo lite anew in Ihe United! -m our trnzc aml vvc became numb while ruiuiinc Ibe Judo Expert Subdues Minneapolis Gunman cargo back in the which had been used lo deliver 7.090 lens r.f ransom supplies to numb while ruiuiinc ICO feet in our car." said nanl. N'eilher man suffered any ill effects after wiling warmed up and inlo dry clothes. Mosl ol the refugees were rela- tives of Ihe invasion prison- ers. They were decks in close, sjnelly holds from Iht lime of Iwardmn unlil afler the ship: THEY COULD reached Florida. I ATLANTIC CITY, S..I, Leaving Havana harbor, llicy single fallout shcllcr here is dcsig- asked repeatedly lo .be permillcd natcd for use by persons, a lasl glance al Ilieir native conn-'. The structure is the. city's Con .MLV.VKAPOLIS _ Two One Bar at that address on north- patrons, one of Iheni a judo ex- easl Broadway, peri, subdued a wmiliMjo holdup' man Thursday nigbl in a imilli-i m'n identified as Donald A. c.rsl Minncaiwli.! invern afler linnl up ibrrr riislnincr.s man, jumixxl Ccwk. wreslitvl him to the. door and held him until police could uct Ihere. Russell Krucger pistnl-whipiwd Ihe barlender.jani' ''f'ter Pikala, Ihe second man. Lawrence Jan- The robbery attempt ,illrr ordered Ihrm lo hand over all Ihe gunman "and an alleged part- lncir money, ner had robbed a cab driver and Afler lonling Ihe rcfji.stcrs the then driven lo (he tavern dro, '.'.1, remained in Hie cab as Cook entered the lavern but later drove avvny. He Police Shortly gave this 0 afler S day. min. -18 al 8 a.m. loday, noon Castro's Communist stale, hut sad j er pitched and J. High cloud overcast, Mind culm, leave Inch1 native land eWil-foot se.is lisihjjiiy 15 barometer S0.30 Some of the aged and ,he il! j The high ration of sickness was iryrhiir.he' request .he cab and unsteady, humidily 62 had walked aboard Ihe ship ai.ribu.ed lo the emoliowl stale, because of !he possibility nf dan-1 proved by Civil IMense officials as fJhbc.1 h.m Iliev "m- 'in were taken oft on slrctch-lof Ihe Cuoans and Iheir lack oligerous overcrowding of Ihe rails, a falloul shelter, jthcn drove lo Ihe- Ono Hundred in the! Biinmcn demanded that PikalaHcr and idenlifiedby Mazda as the jlurn over his wallet, as the custo-1 pnniran's accomplice. sequence oMncrs had. When the barlender ex-: While they were waiting oulsiclc plained he Iwd no wallet, lhc sus-jlhc laxi driver said .tomlro had p.m., iwojiml slarlrd I" boat him with the 1 returned the fa taken from him inslnl bun i earlier. Seeini; a chance, .leiry liason.l Tinth men, Minnraixilis residcnlji Vi. mid Ailhiir Daivs, W, the held wilhoul charge. 1   

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