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Winona Daily News: Tuesday, September 10, 1957 - Page 1

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   Winona Daily News (Newspaper) - September 10, 1957, Winona, Minnesota                               Mostly Cloudy Tonight; Showers, Mild Wednesday Formerly Winoni lUpublicin-Htrald DAILY NEWS 102nd Ytir of Publication Largest Circulation In State Outside Duluth, Twin Cities WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1957 SIXTEEN PAGES Nashville School Damaged by Blast Justice Department Asks Injunction at Little Rock WASHINGTON (II Ally. Gen. Brownell today moved through court action to end use of Ihe Ar- kansas National Guard in the Little Rock integration crisis. ;The attorney general petitioned the federal district .court at Little Rock for an injunction to restrain Gov.'Orval B. Faubu's from using the guard to prevent entrance of eligible Negro students to Central High School. s action was announced by the Justice Department here. Brownell acted in response to a directive from Federal Judge Ronald N. Davies, who has three times ordered desegregation at Central High. In line with Davies' order, the petition for an injunction sought a restrainer not only against Gov. Faubus but also against Maj. Gen. Sherman T.- Clinger, head of the Arkansas National Guard, and Lt. Col. Marion E. Johnson, head of the guard detachment now ring- ing the school. ension Is iuildingllp At Lifile Rock U.S. Begins First Legal Moves In Dispute SUSPECTED SPIES Martha Dodd Stem and her hus- band, Alfred, hold a press conference in Prague, Czechoslova- kia; With them is their son, Robert, 12. They recently obtained Paraguayan passports and went to Czechoslovakia from Mexi- co, where they originally had taken refuge. In New York a federal grand jury Monday indicted the Sterns-for conspiracy to commit espionage for Soviet Russia. (UP Telephoto) Russia and Syria i By WARREN ROGERS JR. WASHINGTON W Russia and Syria had notice today that the United-States still is willing and able to meet force with force. Determination to use American power if it Becomes necessary major speech yesterday by the State Depart- hUnt'j 'third-ranking Deputy Undersecretary Robert Muf- pbj.< He addressed the annual conference of U-S. mayors in New York City. N Murphy said: II would be mwise to underestimate the industrial and military power of our country, 'to misinterpret our deter- mination." Officials said Murphy's speech was deliberately made to set the record straight so there would be no Communist miscalculation that he Middle East is a "weak as Murphy put it, and ripe for 'i, iVl In IJIniflrV if] I 111 VllUllfVj i 111. f II War Af NAFVOC1 1 1 HI Ul II VI TVJf iggre DAMASCUS, Syria W-Syria's cabinet was summoned into an urgent session today as the na- tion's press 'demanded nationwide mobilization to meet what it called the threat of U. S. a; sion. Official sources said the pur- pose of the session.was to study what they described as "U. S. anti-Syrian provocations" and to decide Syria's course. The meeting was called on the heels of-a Syrian charge that five U. S. warships steamed close to the Syrian coast Sunday. Foreign Minister Salah Bitar told Syrian newspapers this coun- try ".will not be terrorized by US. military demonstrations or any American war of nerves against us." "Neither military demonstra- tions nor' a U. S. war of nerves will make us deviate from our Arab liberation policy. On the Con- trary, these acts will certainly bolster our determination to ad- here to our policy and defend Bitar said. charge that U. S. warships approached the Syrian coast was made by a Syrian army spokes- man. He added that unidentified jet fighters flew over the Syrian port of Latakia Monday. He sale Syria so far had made no protest to Washington. In Washington, the Navy said none of its' ships are operating close to the. Syrian coast. A spokesman said the bulk of the U. S. 6th Fleet is in the Aegear Sea between Greece and about 500 miles from the Syrian coast. Tfle American official said some U. S. destroyers might have been cruising in the eastern Medi- terranean in recent days, but he asserted none had been in sight of the Syrian coast. Syria's charge was linked with Secretary of Stale Dulles' state- ment Saturday. Dulles reported on a While House conference in which Presidcnl Eisenhower urged the Syrian people to act to ease the fear of Communist-in- spired attacks by Syria on its neighbors. "No sooner was the Dulles statement on Syria the Syrian spokesman said, "than provocative, irritative operations were begun with the aim of stir- ring Syria into taking such measures as to be used as a pre- text to launch aggression against ilucking without American resist- ince. Three factors figured in the iming, officials said. They were :i) failure.to reach agreement with Russia at the London dis- armament talks; (2) the Soviet Union's boastful announcement wo weeks ago that it had suc- cessfully launched an interconti- nental missile, coupled with more recent statements from Moscow hat Russia icould beat America in any nuclear war; and (3) stepped-up Communist penetration of the Middle East through power seizure and arms buildups in Syria. American officials noted that Russia followed its missile' an- nouncement with a publicity cam- paign aimed at picturing Ameri- ca as a military weakling. Only last Sunday Soviet air chief Konstanlin A. Vcrshinin said Russia could destroy the United States and all its allies with smaller losses itself. Vershinin told the Soviet Communist paper Pravda that a Soviet H-bomb at- tack could inflict 50 million cas- ualties on the United States. Murphy said In his speech "We have taken, constant initiative to bring into being a comprehensive disarmament agreement with built-in safeguards. It is entirely possible that this initiative has been misinterpreted in some world areas as a decline in American power." L He mentioned big Soviet arms shipments lo Syria, Egypt and Yemen, and to the arrival in the Middle East area of what he said yrcre substantial numbers of Rus- sian technicians. "I think it should be said to those countries impressed by Sov- iet power politics and access to Soviet arms, Communist methods being what they are, they run the grave risk of absorption and loss of their he said. Murphy repeated a favorite Dulles the Commu- nists might never have attacked In Korea if they had known be- forehand that the United States would fight, and that no such mis- calculation must ever be permit- led again. REDS WANT MORE MILK MOSCOW W- The Soviet Union looking for more milk and butter has established a national dairy men, scientists, and inventors o dairy machinery. Soviet officials just back from a study of dairying in Italy, announced at the same time affiliation of this new com mittee with the International Dairy Federation. Hurricane Carrie Over Ocean Today MIAMI, Fla. season's third hurricane crept along its west-northwest course over ocean wastes today, twice as nasty with half the distance to go to the gen eral vicinjty ot land areas. An advisory from the U. S Weather Bureau at San Juan said the storm was carrying 160- mile peak winds, and moving al 11 miles an hour. If Carrie stayed on prospect which could not be would pass San Juan 300 to miles to the northeast and find addition a hundreds of miles of open sea in its path. Miami, nearest U. S. mainlanc point to the hurricane, is abou miles west-northwest of Sai Juan. .Tropical storm Debbie, whicl formed in the Gulf of Mexic after Carrie was discovered, blew northward and th Carolinas after pounding Florid with heavy rain -and 35-45, mil I winds Sunday. Farm Couple's Deaths Ruled Murder, Suicide TRACY, Minn. W-A ruling o murder and suicide was given b Dr. Hugh Patterson, Murray Coun ty coroner today, in the shotgun deaths of Mrs. Russell Engler, 29 and her husband, 34. Ten children the oldest 12, were orphaned b the shooting. Patterson held Engler shot h. wife Monday morning with a 12 gauge shotgun, then turned th weapon on himself. Patterson sai evidence at an inquest in Trac Monday indicated the couple ha been out the night before but ha returned home early. He said ther was no evidence of excessive qua reling. Orville, 12-year-old son of th who found the bodies, wa he only Engler child to appea at the inquest. The boy said he wa n the barn milking when he hear a shot but thought his father wa shooting a squirrel. He invest ;ated when he heard a second sho The 10 children are being care or by an aunt. Members of th amily are making arrangemen for their' permanent care. Tl youngest child, Cindy, is 4 month The Englers rented a farm nea -urrie, Minn. BULLETIN LITTLE ROCK OR- A U. S. marshal passed through the main gate of the Governor's Mansion today with an order directing Gov. Orval Faubiu apear in Federal District Court Sept. 20. Troops guarding the maniion opened the gates for the of- ficer. By RELMAN MORIN LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (fl Gov. Orval Faubus, entrenched behind armed troops in his official man- ion, .watched the federal govern- nent's first legal moves today in he bitter struggle over integrat- ing high schools in the Little Rock area. Tension is building rapidly in he dramatic, fast-moving story. It centers at three points 1. The federal courts where U.S. attorneys are preparing to ask an njunctibn, naming Faubus as one of the defendants, and restraining any further interference with the order to integrate. 2. North Little Rock High School of the first outright racial violence yesterday where all available police were ordered to take up guard stations today. 3. Central High School in Little Rock, still surrounded by National Guardsmen under orders from Faubus to turn away any Negro students attempting to enter. are two key questions still to be answe red- Will the governor permit fed- eral authorities to pass through the guards at the mansion and- personally serve him with notice of the restraining order? If he refuses, what action will the federal government take against At a press conference in his mansion, Faubus gave no indica- tion of steps he may take when the "I have not received official no- tice of it and it will be a very important legal q u e s t i o he said. "I'd like to see the official notice to see just what it in- volves." Reporters asked what the troops guarding the mansion would do if federal marshals attempt to enter to serve the notice. He said, "They have no instruc- tions on that point." But the first big.legal move was expected to be taken today. At Newport, R.I., where Presi- dent Eisenhower is vacationing, presidential press secretary James Hagerty yesterday an- nounced: "The attorney general has informed the President that the Department of Justice will comply with the order of the U. S. District Court as soon as possible, possibly tomorrow." Meanwhile, there was intense speculation that a compromise, spearheaded by the governors of five slates, may be in the making to dissolve the impasse between the U.S. government and Faubus. Massachusetts' Gov. Foster Furcolo, a Democrat, telephoned Faubus and laid before him a proposal to put the Little Rock dispute in the hands of five gov- ernors for study and recommen- dations. 4 Classrooms Wrecked by -gjjxisjigi SB Explosion SCHOOL 'BOMBED' Police inspectors probe the wreckage at Hattie Cotton School in Nashville, Tenn., hit by a dynamite blast early loday, as the first serious violence erupted in the tense integration struggle. (UP Telephoto) Not Peace At Any Price, Says Dulles WASHINGTON W-Secretary of State Dulles said today he believes the Syrian situation will be worked out peacefully although there are elements which could lead to serious trouble. He told a news conference the United States does not believe in peace at any price and under cer- tain circumstances would act, but he did not define the circum stances or indicate the possibili ties of action. Dulles said the Soviet Union is trying to realize Russia's tradi tional far back into Czarist gaining control 01 the Middle East. Moscow appears to be trying to challenge the policies of the Unit- ed States in standing up for the independence of Middle Eastern countries, Dulles added. He ruled out any kind of con. sultation with Russia aimed at de veloping a general hands-off agreement toward the highly ttra tegic area. The United States, Dulles com mented, is highly skeptical of ar rangements with the Soviets for hands-off policies because thej are liable to lead to Western "hands off" and Russian hands "under the table." Man Awaits Sentencing in Death Fight DOG OH TRIAL Tippy, an German Shep- herd, looks sadly at the camera after being banished from the residential district of his Menominee, Mich., home. The dog was accused of biting a little girl, but his owner, Donnie Ander- kneeling besidft Tippy, contended the child had pulled the dog's tall. The ju'lge, however, ordered Tippy confined to lot on the edge of the city. (UP Telephoto) MINNEAPOLIS Ift-Lee T. Spci cher, 25, Minneapolis, today await ed sentencing on a second degrei manslaughter charge to which hi pleaded guilty Monday. Speicher admitted firing the sho which killed Robert Varnado, 24 also of Minneapolis, after an argu ment about pay for a bottle liquor the night of July 4. Speicher had been charged with first degree manslaughter bu George M. Scott, Hennepin County attorney, agreed to accepting hi; ple'a to the lesser crime. Violence Against Negroes Helping Reds, Says Dulles WASHINGTON IB-Secretary o State Dulles said today violenc against Negroes in the Arkansa school segregation dispute is be ing used by Red propagandist abroad. Dulles told a news confcrcnc he saw some pictures in th newspapers this morning and h is sure these will not be helpful I the United Slates abroad. Dulles said, in response to question, that he had no doub Communist propagandists ar playing up the race incidents I make the United States look ba to the rest of the world. Dulles said he had made n study of such Red propaganda But said he h3s no doubt that th; is the case. Head-on Car Crash Kills 5 in Ontario WOODSTOCK, Ont. IB A 5; year-old Toronto woman, her sons and two Toronto teenage: were killed Monday night In head-on collision six miles east here. A sixth person was severely 1 jurcd. The dead: Mrs. Wilson Redman 55, of Toronto, her two sons, John 17, and Paul, 20, and Kennel Armour, 17, and Gary Eaton, 1 both of Woodstock. Severe injuries were suffered b William Arthur Prior of Wcxx stock. TAND FOR DESEGREGATION Ike Putting Full Weight ot Office Into Court Order By MARVIN L. ARROWSMITH NEWPORT, R. I. (ffl President Eisenhower is putting the full restige bf his office behind a federal court order designed to achieve chool integration in tension-ridden Little Rock, Ark. He was reported determined today also to throw the full power f the office, if need be, into the showdown struggle between the tate and the federal government But the President's vacation icadquarters continued to refuse o shed any light on just how that power might be used if Arkansas ov. Orval E. Faubus remains defiant. James C. Hagerty, White House iress secretary, did say Eisen- lower .deplores the incidents of iolenee which occurred yester- lay in Arkansas and elsewhere n the Soulh in the newly flaring chool desegregation crisis. The President jot word early ast night that Federal Dist. Judge Ronald N. Davies had e government" to take injunctive action against Faubus 6 halt his use of National Guards- men to keep Negroes from at- ending tittle Rock's Central High ichool. Eisenhower, who has said he will uphold the Constitution with every legal means at his com- mand, received the word from Ally. Gen. Brownell. Then Hagerty told newsmen hat Brownell had advised "that he Department of Justice will comply with the order of the U.S. district Court as soon as pos- probably today. And what if Faubus and Ark- msas guard officials whom )avies also ordered itill stand in the way of mingling of white and Negro students? That question carne up at another Hagerty news conference shortly before Davies acted. Hag- erty said only: "We're consider- 'ng many things." Another question was whether he President was putting "the 'ull power and prestige of his of- behind Judge Davies, who it that point had not yet ordered .he government to move for an njunclion against Faubus and the others. Hagerty said the answer was 'of course" if the question meant .vas the President supporting the District Court in whatever action it decided to order. Meanwhile, a compromise pro- posal by Massachusetts Demo- cratic Gov. Foster Furcolo ap- peared to get a White House cold shoulder. Hagerty declined comment on the Furcolo plan. Fauhus earlier had agreed to it. Daniel C. Gainey, State GOP Leader, Ike Appointee NEWPORT, R.I. IB- President Eisenhower Monday Daniel C. Gainey, a appointee Minnesota Republican leader, a member ot the Government Contract Commit- tee set up to prevent hiring-firing racial discrimination. Gainey, 59, was named to suo cced John Minor Wisdom of Orleans, recently appointed to the Federal Circuit Court. The appoint mcnt was announced at Eisenhow er's vacation headquarters. The contract committee was created by the President during his first term to guard agains discrimination on the basis of race creed or color in hiring and, firinf at companies which have govern menl contracts. Gainey has a jewelry firm a Owatonna. Minn., his borne. Maine Ends long ;to Vole in November By BILL LANGZETTEL PORTLAND, Maine ffl-Malne las abandoned Its first-in-the latton September, election date to oin the 47 slates that ballot in November.. The decision ending a tradition 137 years old was taken in a spe- cial referendum election yester day. About a fifth of the half-million registered voters participated. The change will be effective in 1958. And starting In 1960, Maine gov ernors will serve four-year terms with a limit of two elected terms S'ow the term is two years am here is no limitation. No gover nor, however, has served more han two terms. The constitutional amendments were among five referendum is- sues approved in the special tlec ion. Another amendment permit pledging of the stale's credit t guarantee mortgages on new In dustrial plants. Two bond issues were ratified One is for 24 million dollars t start paying Maine's share in th 1956 federal interstate highwa. irogram. The other raises V, millions for state-owned ferrie serving four Penobscot Bay is lands. Gov. Edmund S. Muskie (D who campaigned in favor of a five issues, said he was delighted With only 11 small precinct missing out of the stale's 630, th unofficial tally was: Shifting the ye and no. Four-year term an Industrial loans an 30.641. Highway bonds an Ferry bonds and 30 401. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Mostl cloudy with little change in lem peralure this afternoon and night. Occasional rain tonight an possibly this afternoon. Wednesda considerable cloudiness and mil with possible showers. Low tonig! FO, high Wednesday 76. High th afternoon 78. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 3 hours ending at 12 in. today: Maximum, 78; minimum, 5 noon, 70; precipitation, trace; su fcls tonight at 7.27; sun rises I morrow at 6.41. AIRPORT WEATHER (North Central Observations) Max. temp. 77 nt 4 p.m. Mo day, min. 59 at 8 a.m. today, noo 65, scattered layer of clouds feet, overcast at fee visibility 15 miles, wind from   here were segregation demonstra- ions, and had been seen at rallies held here by John Kasper, New tersey-born segregationist. City Building Inspector J. Douj. as'Roach said he found 65 per ent of Hattie Cotton building ai otal loss. He said further probing might show the other 35 per cent Iso unusable. School board officials said chool was built with cily funds. o federal money was involved. An electric clock at the school topped at a.m. when oncussion blew it from a class- oom wall. Police set up lines a block from lie schools in all directions to pre- a repetition of Monday'i lemonstrations on the school pounds. Only one Negro was enrolled at Hattie Cotton, which has a regis- ration of 390 in all its six grades. n contrast to the disorders at ome of the other schools, Hattia Cotton went through its integra- ion process quietly and without ny disorder. School authorities expressed be- ief the school might be a total OSS. Completed in 1950, it was of modern construction and con- ained considerable glass, all of which was shattered. Buildings three blocks' away were damaged by the massive ex- ilosion. Lights were shattered in a drug- store show window three blocks distant; Ihe ceiling of a grocery wo blocks away was cracked. Dwellings across the street wera damaged; their porches littered with splintered glass. The east wall of the school blown out, leaving a hole big enough to drive a truck through. "It sounded like the whole world one big loud aid city patrolman Joe Casey who ives nearby. No Negroes had been expected o enroll in the predominantly white east Nashville school District and it was the only one of the six racially mixed schools hat escaped without segregation- si demonstrations. The schools admitted 8 total of 15 Negro first-graders in their 'irst step toward court-ordered Desegregation. There are 'irst gvaders including whites among the city's school pupils. The dynamite blast came only a few hours afler police had dis- persed a violent crowd of about 500 segregationists who were smashing windshields and win- dows of Negroes automobiles with bricks and bottles as they passed r'chr school. Fehr, which is located in a borderline Negro-white residential district, was the focal point of much of yesterday's disorders. Three persons were arrested in the day and night disturbances, including one woman who was ar- rested twice. No injuries have been reported so far. Police Sgt. John Irwin said found a detonating cap wire at the scene. He said the dynamite apparently was exploded in the school's entrance hall between Ihe library and a classroom. The concussion ripped through the building, tearing down walls and blasting every window from the one-story structure.   

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