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Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard Newspaper Archive: December 12, 1889 - Page 1

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Publication: Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard

Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

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   Freeborn County Standard, The (Newspaper) - December 12, 1889, Albert Lea, Minnesota                               Enterprise VOL. XXXII. ALBERT LEA, MINN., DECEMBER 12, 1889. XO. 50. FOB TODN8 LADIES. A BOARDING SCHOOL WITH ALL THE -i- Comforts and Beautiful of Hc.me Life. None but In- itruetom Employed. Studies embrace Complete College Course. KurCatalogaeand other informatloD address. Itee. II. It Abbott, It. D President, or It. G. Parker, Sec. of Executive Committee. Albert Lea. Jlitm. Jtream after tlrvuni ensues; tml ttlll tlream Unit they Hltall ntlfl .ttttl still tire. Tliis is the iix of our Competitors. They strive to meet our Bargains and dream and hope tlm How Kt in in Kxteiiiive aii'! Slly'.tly I'rolitablp r.-osn j u sh-r- L. E. TW18T. A. O. TWIST TWIST BROS., Draymen AND DEALEUS IN All Kinds of Wood. We Iiavt the only pf rfecl appliance for moving 1'iatios and Organs. Orders (or Moving Ilouvlmld and other Goods given HtOMIT ATTENTION. Wood Sawed to Order! Country as well City Trade Solicited. Office al ohlliuier Cu'i Hardware Store. TWIST BROS. may sometime do it. Dreams don't count. in vain 1 fhev never succeed, trouble is. file on jrivus is 5 cts. per pound loner than th- ur.ti-r retting; it is leas and risky to r-t in ti'.an Another industry that can be run in Albert Lea to is a rope and I Doons a small town or iras inhabit- ants, that iii1'! :-uru spinning factorv v.-.m-li employed li) hands, larsjelv nov's arid girls. 1 uni working iiere in one of the ilax sons lion to gr. dhtct to M. Mary's.'but on itisjiiiry 1 K-arued that iSaden is the principal !iax city in theri- fore stopped oif first, and expect to go ton. Mary's, tomorrow. I j of the ..M Mr. of the lirm business. It is ligh i side work which ot .1 x Livingston, who are the lead- soon can be leaned this ml" ing ilux Canada and perhaps and boys U who 'an in the v.orld. I his gentleman invited from 75 cents to SI 23 per day now -in to his home and Hitcrtamed me the j wore in summer. Several of these liolidav BIG BOSTO TT through his works of four diiterri.t ;t liax liber mill, :M. an oil shop in which niiiis are manu- 'i'- in and control Is Knocking Prices Down to Hard-ran, continue our Trade to C. L. COLEMAN, M.inu.'dclurT of and Dealer Iii Lumber! LATH, SHINGLES. Narrow Margin of Pro e A'ld :il! kinds of BUILDING MATERIAL a! Living 1'rlcfi. A. J. STADHEIM, Agt. ai.'! inrd smith of S. M. depot. SS Prics-Ctep. m Way to Sell-Fur Cad ONEWAYTO QET ALONG.-HARD WORK. O..V.TI noes tin; old Credit System.' Uuy your i.uudi. where yuu ran jet lliem J. W. STAGE Than to lie lonesome with few customers and backwoods prices. We do not show you a line of goods we know you know the worth of, sell them to you for less than cost, and then make it up by charging you from S2 to 85 more on Suits and Underwe; In a line you are not posted in. This is a common trick with some dealers. Our goods are plainly marked, and are im-ariablv also in this city, c.'-t.iblislimfci.t.s: 1st -d. a ilax dressing null, 4th, a mac. ail machine? for the tactitrcd. r.t'MUi-s I .city, tin- ilax r mills 111 ten other cities, and 1 the combined capacity of their 11 mills j turn nut fully i.ijirti tons of ilax, i lihi-rannually. learned that it has i been found m-jat tnaclicablf to run in I each tnv. n v. hen-ilax culture is prac-! ticiible only one mill ot limited capaci-' t> a mil! large en i the -.ea.-mi tin Thi.-, niivd M lor tV.O (jlVi. can in- uiiived from ti without much i move all spare handi Ir.im the citv to I help in the lield. Men, women "and children, all that work and are willing to lind paying en> ployment in the lie-Ms, pulling the i straw and preparing it bv spreading it on the grass and then gathering it j again. After the field work is done 1 about the latter part of October, then goodly number of men and boys will home next week, as 1 have about all information needed to make the ilax business a success if I get the proper assistance. J.'II. SIKIIMA.V WATKKHOKKS AM) ELECTKH1 tu work up i'todtict of about crop should DP as possible, thi- product! lield to the mill i and second, to A I'-Rir ami Liberal Proposition from i K. T. SyUes A Co. to Provide a Sys- j (em of Karli-The Best Offer That J2a.s Keen Made-Kai-ly Action Im- portant. Agreeably to the almost unanimous sentiment of citizens and his coadju- tors of the council. Alderman Morin has been negotiating fora satisfactory pro-, position for a system of waterworks and in connection with it. an electric I lighting system that will fully meet the requirements of the city and the pub- lic. Having become acquainted with the high standing and business ability and integrity of K. T. Sykes Co. of Minneapolis. Mr. Morin consulted with i the lirm, and finally succeeded in form-1 mating an ordinance for a franchise and an examination of the instrument reveals the fact that he has obtained a Piano Lamps, Library Lamps, Stand Lamps, Table Lamps, Bracket Lamps, Night Lamps, A.t. KoUom Johnson, Nelson Nelson, AI.UKRI I.10A. very favorable which, with proposition, and one some amend- ____......_ t ipiii possibly fmd steady employment at I ments' ought to be in the mills during the winter and I reasonable citizens. It clearly protects spring. the interests of the city, and "is liberal The growins of rhix N dune by farm- several important features. Afran- ers in two different ways, and either i ('llise oi .vars is provided for. with way will pay Freeborn county farmers i a privilege of 00. it the city does not more than any other crop they are now- raising per acre. Out- way that a farmer furnishes liis seed, labor etc.. and sells the (lax straw together with the seed to the mill at per ton- one acre will yield on an average two tons, and sometimes more, making per acre and saving the cost of thresh- ing. Another way is. that the mill rents from the farmer plowed land at about S7 per acre; the" mill furnishes the seed and also pays the farmer 85 per acre for pulling the Ilax straw. I learn that there are many boys around here from 14 to It! years old who easily pull an acre Ilax "in four days, thus earnings 1.23 per day. The more I see of thi.-. !iax business. desire to purchase, and provides that the city may have an option to pur chase every five years on a very reason able and just basis. The city is not re quired to guarantee any bonds or in terest, or to provide or guarantee supply of water. Five miles of maim with (JO hydrants are to be provided the city simply contracting to pay for the use of the hydrants at S64 each per year. Free water is to be furnished for the use of and for the buildings of the fire department, for city offices for the public schools, for a public drink- ing fountain for man and beast in each ward, and for a public fountain The scale of prices allowable for private patrons is that generally in vogue OUR NEW STORE, Is 120 feet deep, two stories and bascim-nI. and is chock full of as complete a sto "JBera you In ll I I'AV THE HIGHEST PRICE IN CASH L Tor Olil Iron. Kriea. Copper, Rubber, Lead, Rope. nc. All done In Tin, ir.m. Copper. Zmc, and Galvanized Iron (nit In, SKIVPS Repaired and new cast- 33TI would like to tradegoons "r iitiiod buKTjr.w pay cash lor a good new crw. J. W. STAGE, Cur William and Washington St. One Price to me more I see of tin.-, ilax business. is that generally in vogue the better I can see th" advantage of TIie system is to have a pumping ca- introducing it in Albert Lea, and I can pacity of two million gallons daily, and discover nothing that will prevent a besides a standpipe 20 feet in diameter and 100 feet high, to be erected f01 reservoir. Altogether the terms of the proposed franchise are liberal and fair, and seem to be properly guarded: it seems toful- lill the requirements of the council as successful development of' the flax liber industry in Freeborn county. The amount of wages that would have to be paid to employes would support a good manv families, and the farmers by raising ilax can make S20 per acre. What other grain or produce will give them equal returns V' sell Reliable Goods at Reliable Prices: no imita- tions. Our Stock is simply immense, and in BABBITT, -DEALERS IX- 1 J till !CE and GRAYING. KEEP IN STOCK ALL qUALITLES t and urades of Wood and Coal, and will "Plilv city and farmers' trade at lowest prices. coal iilwajs on Imnd. Wood lo GRIPMAN BABBITT. lard WPSI o[ the Gilbert House. Order siale nt T. V. Kiiatvold'3, and Owen Maliner's. j Good Suits at from Wild Cat Coats, former prfce All Wool Suits, All Wool Black Worsted Suits, for All Wool Flannel Shirts for D. W. HAYES SON, DEAMiKS IN LIME, STUCCO, CEMENT. WE HAVE THE LARGEST FUEL YARD In City, and are prepared to mi promptly large or small orders. We arc doing business on a-very Close Margin of Profit, And guarantee Quality, Measure and Weight. Farmers' at our yard and examine our stock and prices. If. OAVES SOX. Yard on College Street, two blocks eait of Union Depot. SI 5.00 for 810.00 85.00 86.00 81.00 The demand for liber is practically unlimited. "While at Mr. Livingston's house I got acquainted with a gentle- man from Xew York, who represented a large spinnery which requires a car- load of flax liber per day. which is more than Canada is now able to pro- dnce. and there are a number of other J spinneries which have to import Hax i irorn .Russia, France, and other couri- tries, which will be glad to get supplied i at home. J. II. SIERMAX. ST. MARY-. OXT., Dec. 5th, j Editor writing you last week I have seen a good deal more ____________________________. jot' Canada and the Canadians: have i visited several of the inland towns like Waterloo. Stratford, lierlin, and .St. I Marys, which have not more, perhaps not as many natural facilities as Al- ,v 1'ert Lfa. There is neither cheap coal e can supply six counties. Look at these samples: Iorwood' soft is per ton and i wood 84 per cord: still they have in j these towns a number of good-sized I factories, like tlax mills, spinneries, i tanneries, foundries, agricultural im- i plement shops, furniture factories, cheese, broom, corset, button factories' and the like. The country has not been longer settled than Minnesota, nor are there better markets here for the goods produced; but the reason that even the inland cities are built up by such vari- ety of industries is that these cities en- courage any enterprise which will locate there by a good-sized bonus. Nearly all Canada towns that have flax mills paid from SS.IXM to 810.000 to parties desiring to start such mills, and it was a good investment for all these towns, as a tlax null will pay out for i wages and raw materials four times j that amount during one season, and all 1 that money will' circulate at homo where it does the most good to furnish a large number of good consumers to buy produce from farmers and goods from dealers. This city of St. Marys paid last season a binder and mower factory, that employs a hundred hands; such a factory miglit just as well be at Albert Lea. as, St. Marys has neither coal, iron or hard wood or what might be needed for these implements. All the raw material is shipped in, still the factory is here, and keeps running, and the wages paid to its hundred em- ployes are felt by the farmers and merchants as an encouraging feature, while the poor laborers, who formerly for lack of employment might have been forced to leave the town, are now good consumers and desirable citizens. The amount paid for bonus will soon' be made up by the advantage of hav- ing such factory. There are also two lla-r liber mills in this city employing about lifty hands in fall, winter and spring, and three times as much in summer, and there is no reason why one or two such mills could no_t be run successfully in Albert Lea. When i showed my samples of (lax raised at Albert Lea and the flax liber as retting in Albert Lea lake, the people here were surprised that farm- ers around there should waste the flax straw und buy twine of imported fiber at 15 to IS cents per pound, and that business men would allow alk this money to go out of Albert Lea, when it might be kept at home with a little effort. The owners of the flax mills here say at would mean a large fortune to them if they had a lake around here as in Albert Lea, but the water here is too hard for retting flax. The fiber ret- And so on through the stacks of Clothing that you see piled up on our counters. Underwear of all kinds is so cheap that [he poorest can afford to be warm and happy. We carry certain lines of goods that you can get of no other dealer in Albert Lea. We are sole agents for man- ufacturers, and these no competitor can match in quality or price. If you have not already called, drop in at once and examine our great piles of Hats, Caps, and Gents' Furnishing Goods, These beat, the Natives. No dreaming with us. We mean business. B. STERIV, Prop. developed in the discussions of that body when the matter was under con- sideration several months since, and if so, there is no reason why it should not be promptly acted upon. That the citizens of Albert Lea de- mand, and that the city must be pro- vided with a system of water works during the coming year is evident, and no time should be wasted in concluding favorable terms to secure it. The contract should be made at once so provisions can be made for the work by the contractors, and the undertaking commenced early next Spring. The proposition submitted for an electric light franchise is very simple Messrs. Sykes Co., merely ask the privilege of establishing a system tak- ing their chances for patronage The system in existence is admittedly of too small a capacity; the council "has after earnest efforts, failed to secure sufficient lights for the principal streets and it is acknowledged that the grow- ing importance of the city, its progress and actual necessities require a com- prehensive, modem system, and one that will furnish lighting at a low scale of prices, at rates that will enable the council to light the principal streets in a creditable manner and citizens to ob- tain for their business houses and homes the best and cheapest system of illumination. There is no doubt as to the earnest purpose and public spirit of the mem- bers of the council in the matter, and they are likely to grapple and settle the question both as -to water works and electric lighting soon and in a way that will be tor tho best interests of the city. Messrs. Sykrs Co., have been put- ting m a system of water works at Anoka this year, and will have it com- pleted in about two weeks. They will then invite the mayor, council, chief of the lire department and other citizens ol Albert Lea to visit that city and witness the test to be made, and a good opportunity will be afforded to investi- gate the merits of the system which the company proposes to furnish. At the council meeting Monday even- ing Messrs. Morin.Knatvoldand'Lowe constituting the waterworks commit- tee, and President Hanson, were ap- pointed a committee to visit Anoka St Cloud and other places to examine sys- tems of waterworks, their cost and de- sirability, and to report their conclu- sions for the action of the council. Johnson's (.yclopaedia. This work has been growing in popu- larity until to-day it stands unequaled before the American people. It eon- tains so many superior pictures over Us competitors that it is the only one desired by students and professional men. ihe American and Britannica works, costing about three times as much as Johnson's, can be had every- day in even exchange for the latter. The merits of Johnson's are fully recognized by our best scholars and educators. This fact is demonstrated by the purchase, of four sets by the faculty of the Xorwegian Lutheran college of Albert Lea. The faculty of Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter has bought eleven sets in the last few years. Our leading educators, minis- ters and all classes of professional men are placing the matchless work in their libraries. Do not be imposed upon by an infe- rior work, but investigate the subject and procure the best. As can be found in this region. We carry line of full Thc Best Kinds of Machine The Famous and Unequalled Beaver Darn Grain Separators, And in fact we shall keep in stock everything be had m a big and well-ordered Hardware Store. We shall make it a point to sell Good Goods at And are confident the inducements we offer will prove highly satisfactory to all our customers. All are in- vited to call, inspect our new store and see our mammoth stock. J. F. WOHLHUTER CO. JOHNSON PETERSON, FURNITURE! UNDERTAKING! KINK LINK Parlor and Chamber Sets, R ATT AX mid RKKD CHAIRS, Extra Eine, New Styles, Ladies' Writing Desks, Might calhanwcml up stairs over Walter .TOHIVSOIV JPETER.SOIV. Blacksmithing, Horseshoeing, and Plow Wort. The making and Repairing of Well Tools a Specialty, snop M INFAVSPAPERf   

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