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Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard Newspaper Archive: August 29, 1889 - Page 1

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Publication: Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard

Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

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   Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard (Newspaper) - August 29, 1889, Albert Lea, Minnesota                                Enterprise OL. XXXII. ALBERT LEA. MINN., AUGUST NO. HEMAN B LAC KM EH, AWVKK. LAM) FOK SA1.K. Al.UKKT J Minn. WM. C. McADAM, AWYEH AMI JI'DOK OK I'KOI'.A'I 1. 1 Ulllc Iu Court Idiiiv. Alqcrl I.i-a, Msnii fliry A. 51 organ Walter J.'l l.i-l. MORGAN TRASK, -10 i.ovri.v a. DR. J. P. VON DERG. JinSlllA.N AM) Sl'lJlir.n'. mi I on lai I; Mitfi t" Hit- i. IVMcltMtrc. I.t.t, Mill G. A STEVENSON. )IIVSH'I1N AVI> M I'.liKON. lll-'I'ICK l KING'S; LAWS. THE RO.U) THAT IS TO BK. C ombination Optometer! DR. H. H. WILCOX. AND AI.BKM l.e.l. Mnill Ollh-e Cl.lli. I II' I (III vl l.t i' llltlVV W. C. MERRILL. Dl.NTI.VI. DKl'H'K I'VFl; hpU'fl A. .Ji IIM'JI d; E E. REMINGTON. iivn. ANDIII t-'K I.M.I m N III pirl ui tlit-i-ixint V I'M'in in ,i (Illiivlf I'nlill II..H-I-. All.i-l mE.fi.UOHN COUNTY BANK. Mid-, H. AliM.il I.U.Mi. I'lil illJh.VT. I i l! I l.'-IUI- 1'. uil-.niii In-ill mi .1 .Sjn-i i.tily. II .i-hl.-i. Doniinick Coiuielly, Snci AND PLASTERING. 1 i t-ji tmt ,l l.UL'r' -li.i'L uj Lime and Cement ilit- 1 :tml mail practical instnmi'-m for ih-' purpose TESTING THE EYES. f .-.lui-Mif, tiit.- Jutiini In V.hll'-UlM. IIP I.lI-sU'tltfd. '1 lit- ini- t.Uirt- nt C a'il Iltrly will Ijf rcatlHs umlriMimil. o i RITIS R K vt llial Hit- locus or inquired lor ,-arli c.iu bf Without Guess-AVork, Or fun filling by with "hlli-iciii ;n ii llie uul l.ul lo iidw- jutir iiiitruiiiHil, wlit-Uin wt-iirhit; or not. Tlii-s Ui- llllirijl IT Ul No Charge For Examination, I. J. WANEK, Manuf.iciun-r of- n u ihoice Cigars Ami Drtilerlu Pipes, Tobaccos, Smokeas' Articles, Etc. Jail Orders Promptly Attended to. ALBERT LEA, MINN ALBERT LEA, MINN. ,'IIK SAI.1-: S-iine 1 ur l ol AliiHint M inil i'itin. iH} I'.ml the enK'T lijmrwood and a large Work Short Horn anil (Me Cattle1 r.ihrs :tud liulls. Always to oilfiller imrtliiiHi- or 1101. A. H'JEUtlK. ALBERT LEA MARBLE WORKS. ,11. IIKbHlXVKH, I'ropriftor, Dealer in all kind-, ol FOREIGN and AMERICAN Moments, Talile-Tops, Shelves, Maisnes, etc, K KEK1' only the best workmen and gnaran- 1 tee satisfaction In every respect. M. BESSINGEK, Cor. Clark and Waslilncton Sts.. Albert Lea. Everything Goes! Prices of Meats _ _ BRUNDIN BRO'S City Meat Market, FINEST SPECTACLES 'I iif'- inutlf. Clocks, Watches, Jewelry u. -k I. ii i in :inil ulli'-r i'lc warranleil. BESSESEN STEEN. JOHNSON PETERSON, FURNITURE! -.V Owing to low price of cattle we will sell meat at thn following low prices, for cash only: Sirloin 10c. or .'llta. for Hound Steaks..........Sc. per or 3'4 for ISc. Shoulder Steaks....................i: la, Tc. per Bi. lit cut Roast............................Sc. per 2nd cut Koait..........................7c. :trd cut Roast.........................oc. llolllng and Srew, ;t to 4 cents, a reduction Iron 2 to 4 cents all around. Wo keep constantly on hand a large stock of meats of all kinds equal to that kept in any first-class meat mar- ket, and remember, that under no cir- cumstances will we be undersold. We have barrels of first-class salt pork which we retail at 8 cents per pound. Tie People's Meat Market, X BROS., UNDERTAKING! ----A FINK USE OK---- Parlor and Chamber Sets, siiKl ItKKL) Extra Fine, New Styles, Ladies' Writing Desks ii prompt Xijrlit calN answered up stairs over Walter Thompson's .TOTIXSOX OUR NEW STORE, Is 120 feet deep, two stories and basement, and is cliock full of as complete a stock of HARDWARE As can be found in tliis region. We carry a full line of The Best Kinds of Paints, Oils, Machine Oils, Door and Window Screens, And in fact we shall keep in stock everything to be had in a big and well-ordered Hardware Store. shall make it a point to sell Good Goods at And arc confident tlic inducements AVC oner Avill prove highly satisfactory to all our customers. All are in- vited to call, inspect our HCAV store and see our mammoth stock. J. F. WOHLHUTER CO. It IP. tin- Duty of the State to 1 Teacli KeliK'O" or 1'uuihh run Only Protect I'ersons in Their .Yaturul Iiights--A Cleur KxpvMltion of No-railed Moral Legislation. Journal ami It is a mistake constantly making in matters pertaining to reforms, that the Mate stands in the place of Cod. and that its business is to decide what is right and what is wrong, what is sin and what is not sin. and to legislate accordingly, forbidding and punishing sin, as such, because it is condemned in 1 the law of God. It is an effort to load 1 upon the state the responsibility of j taking the -vengeance" out of the di- i vide hand and punishing the evil doer, nut simply because of his offense against society, but because of his j offence against divine law. And all this is, as it seems to us, a mistaken view of the province of government. I As we understand it. government is a social compact, in which the individ- ual surrenders to the state certain nat- ural rights, in view of the promise, ex- pressed or implied, on the part of the latter, to prevent or punish the in- fringement of those rights by any other j member of the same society; and only when it is doing for the individual what he has a natural right to do for himself, only when it is protecting the individual against interference with his natural rights, or 15 preventing him from interfering with the natural rights of another can the state be re- garded as in its proper place. The state has a right to protect itself from harm, because thus it protects its indi- vidual members from harm; it has a right to promote the temporal interests ol its citizens, and thus it promotes its own interests. Take, for example, the sin of lying: there can be no doubt that it is one of the most grievous and most prevalent of siiis; and yet the state takes no cognizance of it. except when it is in a court of justice, or when it is shown to have been specifi- cally injurious to another citizen. And so we might go on through the long catalogue and show that it is the business ot the state simply to protect its citizens in the enjoyment of all their natural rights, and whatsoever is more than that coineth of evil. By these principles we, as 13aptists have always stood and ought to stand. AVe recognize one Master, (iod, the eternal, the unchangeable, the just. For our religious beliefs and practices we refuse to give an account to men, and the further the .state keeps away from us. as it pertains to these things, the more it ill be doing the will of our Master. The state has no right to enter into the place of God and punish any citi- zen, because of his sin against God. It ms no right to punish sin, as sin. For he sinfulness ot his acts the individual s amenable only to God himself. It s for the injury imposed upon his fel- the State akes cognizance, and its penalties should never have any other end than the prevention of the recurrence of the offense, either as to the same individu- il or as to another. It is no part of the business of the -tate to teach religion or to look at questions from a religious standpoint. it has been sufliciently demonstrated :hat men cannot be made truly reli- gious by law. and that attempts to nake them such result in the most lespicable hypocrisy and corruption. An Impossible Proposition. The Owatonna Journal oilers the following surprising suggestion: Rochester has addi-tl the snake traflic to its enterprise, li Mr. the dealer, a premium snake for the Southern Minne- sota fair n e would that lie send to Gene- a lake, Kreeborn coiimv, and get the one that las Ijeen carrying ofl Hie swine of that county. It would be very difficult to catch any of the big snakes of Geneva lake, For they are opposed to making an ex- .libition of themselves, and besides, are naturally inclined to hide, so that when you want to see them you cannot. On :he other hand people are said to have ;een them when they did not want to, and in consequence their hair stood on nd like the quills of the fretful porcu- pine, their eyes bulged out, and they were awfully scared. Another thing: if one of the big snakes could be caught, it would be impossible to hold it, and worse than all, it might swallow i fellow or two. Furthermore, finally and forever, let it be understood that the proposition of the Journal to ob- tain one of the big .snakes for the Koch- ester fair is altogether put of the ques- tion and impossible. Xot a snake of Geneva lake would ever consent to it. The fair, and the only fair in all the world that any snake of Geneva lake would consent to attend is the grand and unequalled Fair of Freeborn coun- ty, to be held at the city of Albert Lea Sept. 25th, 2fith and 27th A. 188SI. liig snakes are not fools. AVe have spoken. Farmers' Alliance at Blooming Prairie. Editor will be a meeting of farmers at Blooming Prai- rie Saturday Aug. 31st, 1889, at 3 o'clock p. in., for the purpose of organizing a farmers' alliance. All farmers of Blooming Prairie and vicinity are in- vited to attend and learn the aims and objects of the association. The rapid growth of rings, ti usts and syndicates that grow rich at 5 our expense are suf- ficient evidence of the necessity of united action upon your part to protect yourself from llieir all-absorbing greed. The remedy is in your hands, come and learn how to apply it. A. L. GARDNER, Organizer. Waltham, Minn.. Aug. THIS PAPER g Blacksmithing, Horseshoeing, and Plow Work, The making and Repairing of Well Tools a Specially. Hnop Opposite Knterprlse Office. IM-llniu- an to Extension I This From the Ked I Wing Republican. j A Duluth correspondent writes: "It is said that as soon as the SoOUiO sub- scription for the Duluth, Ked AVin" A: Southern railroad desired here is j raised, work will start from this end of the road. Everything is now favorable with arrangements made for the money and contractors. AVork could begin thirty days after securing Duluth sub- scription." The material for the inside finish of the Duluth road depot at Goodhue has arrived and the structure will be completed very shortly and opened for business. There is some talk of putting in a station on the Duluth road at Pace's, a point about five miles this side of Xumhrota. There is a fine grain grow- ing and stock raising country tributary to that point and it is believed that a good business would be developed there. If the point was made a milk station the milk of at least 400 cows could be secured daily for shipment to the Twin City markets. Arrangements are being made for another conference between the offi- cials of the IX H. AV. S. railroad and the citizens of Duluth to definitely de- termine what aid can be expected by the railroad from that point in return for its being made the northern termi- nus of the road. Ashland and AVash- buru are both anxious to secure that prestige. Piles have been driven for a ninety foot bridge to be put in on the Duluth, :ed AVing ..V Southern road at the point near the Meier's farm, where the wash- out occurred last week. The putting n of this bridge will preclude every possibility of a washout occurring there again. WOX A FAIK, Cholera in Michigan. Dr. F. Larke of Rogers City, Mich- igan, says the epidemic of last year in i'resque Isle county, in which so many persons lost their lives, was choleric dysentery instead of cholera as first reported. He used Chamberlain's Cholera and Diarrhwa Remedy and says it succeeded where all other rem- edies failed. Xot a single case was lost in which it was used. This remedy is the most reliable and most success- ful medicine known for colic, clioleni morbus, dysentery, diarrlwa and bloody lltix. 25 and 50 cent bottles for sale by J'arker liriggs. Wanted '-'00 Salesmen. Permanent situation, guaranteed 840 to per month and expenses or large commission to successful men to sell our nursery stock, plants and seeds Previous experience not essential. Re- ferences required. Apply to L. L. May Co.. nurserymen, florists and seeds- men, St. Paul, Minn. 35U Heriuun PIxcher of 4161 Flcks up tlie Snug Sum of it. LouK fMo.i ings. August 'J. The quiet neighborhood of Easton avenue and Sarah street is all agog over the luck of Jlr. Herman Fischer i popular druggist who lives at Xo! Easton avenue, where he is em- ployed as a clerk by Theodore Fischer. Mr. Herman Fischer was fortunate enough to strike it rich iu an invest- ment made in the Louisiana State Lot- :ery. The July drawing brought him the snug fortune of S3U.OOO. Mr. Fischer has lived in St. Louis for learly 20 years, and is a very popular man. Xaturally his congratulations are numerous. He is about 45 years of age, and has a wife and four children. A reporter called on Mr. Fischer to- day, and found him in unusually good "Yes, sir, it is a said he in reply :o a question. "J am richer :han I was a week ago, and have re- ceived my money. Last month I sent   years, ;uul knows it eun be de- pended upmi. I iiu.ir.mtee Satisfaction will order. IIOICA TIH I'-ITCU, Al'lcn, Minn. C. L. COLEMAN, Manufacturer of IVulf r in Lumber! LATH, SHINGLES. Moulding! And all kinds of nnLniXr; MATI-U1AL at Lowest Living I'riccs. A. J. STADHEIM, Agt. nnil yard south of S. Jl. depot. FOR YOUNG LADIES. SCHOOL WITH AI.I. THK V Comforts Jiid Heautifill Siirroiimllngs of Home Life. None but In- structors Studies enibrace ;i Complete College Course, For Catalogue anil other information Kcr. K. U. Mbott, I) 1'resident, or O. G. farker, Sec. of Executive Committee. Albert Lea, Minn Broadway Wood Yard, GRIPMAN PETTIT. -DEALERS IN- Wood, Coal and Draying Wood Sawed to Order. E WSP A PER BROS1 hardware store. Ijcma order-! on ilute T. A. Nelson's grocery stun1. EWSPAPE.RS   

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