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Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard: Thursday, May 2, 1889 - Page 1

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   Albert Lea Freeborn County Standard (Newspaper) - May 2, 1889, Albert Lea, Minnesota                                Enterprise VOL. XXXLI. ALBERT LEA, MINN., MAY 1889. NO. 18. Arc alwavs -hid to dress their Children lor it is casuiil to MM; them comfortably and to see tlio Children themselves nprl WollMi Hi A voting man or boy with dirty, merged or ill-litting Clothes is ashamed of and it is natural, for there is no excuse for either kind if his parents do their duty. Dirty Clothes fun be ragged Clothes can in; natehed. and AGAIN THE lUMUMi TW1XEOLES- T10-N. Anotlirr View of the 35cii Arc I'p In I Ui'all u-rade-. from the to the lineal, can be boiKi'lit the vcar "round at 1 Parent- .-should call and MJC the great Assortment of Styles for of all ages that we carry. "We M-ll Clothes ready made, Cheaper than von can buv the cloth. Koi nil the Men and Boys in the County, and Prices that will Astonish, are so Low. at the iVIOREY E. STERN, Prop. The most successful and most daraMs of all harvesting machines. Contains every device noeu'ed -'y inaka a machine perfect. Mada of ifio bast materizl and in iha best way. Light draft and easy work for driver and hones. Easiesf rzisad and lowered of any harvester. There is no weight on the horses' necks; no tearing of canvas or straps, there are springs to relieve the strain caused by shrinkage; no choking at 1-or.l uf clevalors, for their is a relief rake to prevent it. No other Binder has Ihin valuable device. Everything on the. CHAMPION has been made as simple and hubritantial as possible. Xo other Harvester has as good cutter bar and guards, or as many and as good knives, or as strong and adaptable reel, or as sim- ple a method of driving the Binder, nor as good plan for squaring the butts of (ho bundles. The CHAMPION Butter is unlike any other, and is superior to them all. The C1IAMPION will cutnll kinds oCsmall grain that grow no inatterin what condition; it is lighter draft than any other Harvester doing the same work; it is easily managed by any farmer; it will cause less trouble and expense for repairs, it will make less delay in harvest time, and it will do more work and be more durable than any other Harvester and Binder that is made. THE WARDER, BUSHHELL OlESSNER COMPANY, SPRINGFIELD, OHIO.------HIAKUFACTURERS-------CH1CAOO, ILL. KeJVrring to the letter of the MeCor- mick Harvester Co. published in your last issue, please insert the lollowing lines in order to illustrate the other side of the question. It is funny read- in" when Md.'orniick states tlie fanners call lor relief McCwmick is> ready with a helping hand to come to their aid." The helping is ex- tended to farmers using McCormick binders in oll'ering an attachment at cash down with order; but MuCur- nnck agrees not lo furnish the m-ces- sary v.ire. and most likely it will be 1111- farmers to obtain any wire at all because the manufacturers of wire may combine nitli the twine men and both try to skin the tanners and divide tin- profit. At any rate Mi- Cormick's brotherly love for the fann- ers 111 calling for ix-liti' is at an end after collecting 81o for an attachment, probably at a prolit of 2m per cent, the lunuers will not be able to use and therefore the relief will only come to MeConuick's treasury. Furthermore, the letter is a bait to other farmer.-; in need of new binders, and likely some victims may be caught by it who never used any ii'ire for binding. Mich farm- ers, however, who lormeriy were sub- jected to the iiimoyanc'- of using wire lor binding, as well as to the danger and losses" in getting tin- broken wire mixed up nitli the straw, iced and grain, will never use ire again, no matter how low the price ul wire and how high the twine. They would souner change their selllmider to a harvester by taking off the binding at- tachment and substitute a plaitorm and table which any farmer could make himself at very little expen-e and bind his grain with straw by hand. In this manner farmers could easily break up any combination adopted tu raise the price of twine, or wire beyond a point which seems unreasonable. It is evident, however, that this season uu such action is necessary, and report.-, about scarcity in material for twine and the alarm about the twine trust is undoubtedly greatly exagger- ated. Considerable twine is carried over all through the country from hist >ear, and then- will not be near as much required in l-'reeboni county us in runner years. While it appears that less manifla and sisal twine is made than formerly, tin- difference is made up by twine made from hemp liber raised in this country. This hemp twine mav not be quite as strong as manilla but it answers to the purpose. The undersigned have been oll'ered such hemp tisiue at a figure to enable us to sell it at cents and we are in hopes tu be able to sell it even 1'or less, while Manilla and sisal twine will sell at 10 to 11 cents. Though these prices do not seem to be out of reason, indi- cations are pointing to considerable lower prices on twine for the near future. It is almost certain that the liber from llax straiv will soon be large- ly worked up for twine in the .North- west, giving a supply of material al- most unlimited. Quite a number of German farmers in Freeboru county will give the llax culture their atten- tion "this season. These men have woiked up the llax liber in the old country, they understand it perfectly, and they claim they can furnish tin- cleaned "liber at 5 cents per pound, ginneries will spring up in every county, and llax twine fully as good as manifla can then be supplied in retail at less than 10 cents per pound, or else farmers can spin it themselves costing only their labor in winter when they cannot employ their time to better ad- vantage. respectfully ask our farmer friends to consider the above state- ments and not let them be influenced to detract from the merits of their machines which they found superior, by such mad efforts and doubtful im- provements forth in McCormick's recent letter. Please bear in mind that the Champ- ion and Moners. which we re- present, do not require such mini tfforts for popularity. Common sense alone will satisfy anybody not prejudiced that the late improvements on the Champion machines make them superior to all other makes of binders and mowers, while farmers who have used Champ- ions for many years are satisfied that their old time" tried machines are still far more desirable than any other named binder or mower even of the latest make. If you want a harvesting machine and want the most practical, durable, most easily managed and of lightest draft, buy a Champion of yours'Kespectfully, SIKUMAX HORNING, Albert Lea. Minn. Branches at Gleuville and Twin Lakes. THE OLD VIEW OF THE BIBLE. Itev. Ward Says that Xow-a-days Xo One Looks There for Scientific Fart. The New York and Brooklyn Asso- ciation of Congregational Churches held its spring meeting last week, at the Trinity Congregational church in Tremont. The -New York Mm says there was a discussion of-The Modern Perspective of the by the Kev. Ur. William Hayes Ward of Newark and editor of the Independent. Mr. Ward said: '-'The old view of the Bible was that it was all verbal plenary in- spiration, and therefore absolutely in- fallible. The traditions of thousands of years had held that the Bible was incapable of error, either historical or ethical. To-day, however, people are willing to listen to coul, logical discus- sions of Biblical questions. They now ask themselves if Isaiah really wrote Isaiah. There is already a split in the Presbyterian church on this very ground. The more advanced critics of the Bible, of whom Prof. Briggs is the chief exponent, say that many scientific facts are not borne out by the Bible, and that is so much the worse for the liible. To-day the progressive Christian weighs everything can-fully, and comes to conclusions in accordance with scieutiiic facts. Nobudy goes to the Bible lor scientific inhumation." The Itev. .loliu L. scndder of Jersey City spoke on the subject of "The Mission of the Church to the Lapsed Masses." Among those present were the llevs. S. .1. N. T.iit. Dr. Lyman Abbott, Dr..I. (J. Pobests, S. B. ilalh- day .1. M. Whiton, Ph. 11. U. II. Ingersoll. and the Kev, II.  ears, the see- iind for one jear and the third for two u-ars. The rules were suspended and the elections were made by acclamation. Mr. D'omiinek made a proposition astocisterns in inch he agreed to build from one to fifty and guanintt-e tlut they would hold water and not hut lie did not olfer to keep them supplied with water. Tlie session then adjounu-d until Fridav eieune. KING'S; c ombiziation Optometer! Cuo Keal Estate Transfers i'rpra Apiil lilli to April 27th, IbS'J, f urnislied by II. K. Fossum, Register of Deeds and Abstractor of Titles: H .1 Amler-ioii to Alfred Larsen, mv see Carlston 5   sec 22 and se ne sec a; and uw no sec Geneva Johannes Giillikson to Cli'irles W Hayes lot 14 blk 4 Morin's add City L O Greene to Ole tlinjum, iw ne section s Moscow Daniel Sheehau and C D Elder to C (J Ed- 100 r wards et al, lot U Alden Village C. G Edwards et al to Wells Creamery Co lot U Alden Village Orndorf toXels 1' Anderson.'. ____ 2000 UCO Assessors' Meeting. A meeting of the Assessors of Free- born county was held at Albert Lea April 27th. On motion John Kobert- son was elected chairman and W. If. Miller secretary. The following sched- ule of average values on personal prop- erty was agreed upon f torses, one year old 5 IS. 00 Horses, two years old 30.00 Horses, three years old and over 53. Stallions, first class 400. Stallions, second class Cattle, one year old Cattle, two jean old Cattle, three vears old and over Cows AVorkini; oxen, per yoke Thoroughbred bulls Sheep 30.00 .00 400.00 150.00 4 .00 s.oo 15.00 rj.ou 40.00 4000 tool 200 35.00 UNDERTAKING! ----A FINE LINE OF---- Parlor and Chamber Sets, antl REED CBUYIRS, Extra Fine, New Styles, Ladies' Writing Desks, CURTAINS and FIXTURES. We put up Curtains lor our Customers. A full line of and Embalming sivcn prompt attention. Night calls answered up stairs over Walter Thompson's boot and shoe store. JOHTVSOIV Good News! We Now Offer Worth of At Cost and Below Cost! Profits No Object! 'lie Goods Must Our Stock if Kresli ami :nul no H.iiikrnpt Slirlf worn They ,irc nil Soliil siml not Nimldy. THE WAR HAS COMMENCED, Anil we will me.Pl any Our prices In the Yl'e mean anil don'l 5011 force! ii. Cull iimlvcforsonrsi'lvcs. Our terms are Spot Cash. Yours Truly, NELSON 8ORENSON. 307 East Broadway. How to JIake Money. To save money is to make money. The common way of washing clothes on a washboard is growing out of favor fast. The Kclipse Washer will do the work better, in less time, and with no wear to the clothes; the savings will in i short time, buy a machine. Used by mudreds of families in this county alone, a recommer.d of this womleiful machine, is unnecessary. S. Ueinsberg warrants them for two years. The Right Kind of A Justice Wanted. Discussing the kind of a justice, of tlio peace needed, in Ilokah, the Chief fearlessly champions the rights of the people- and with patriotic zeal presents their irresistible demands. It says: What ne want is a man that knows law from a reilhori-e when he sees it anil will civc justice 1o whom justice is tine. It is not MjreeaMr to a fellow deride a case against yon just be- caii'-e yon liolil Ills enmity. We want law ami juslice separated from suckers and redhorse. That is the point. I5c, Sure to Heart Carefully. The Pioneer Meat Market has come to the front again fully stocked np with the choicest of all kinds of meat. Xo pains will be spared to keep up its reputation as a first class market in every respect. Cleanliness: choice meats, good weight, fair All we ask is a trial. K. S. IIoKNixci, Proprietor. A. II. McMu.i.KN. Mannger. L. P. .IEXSKN, Cutter and Tender. Hereford Calves for Siile. 1 have a fine lot of half-blood Here- lord bull and heifer calves for sale, and recommend them to the farmers of Kreeborn county. None, aro better, terms reasonable. 0. NKLSON, 12-tf Clark's Grove. JJoriiig for Gas. St. I'aul Globe. A good deal of sport has been made of the scheme in the Kansas legislature to boro four deep holes in different parts of the state. There was some reason in it if there are probabilities of striking natural gas, coal or other valuable, substance. Less rational uses arc made of a good deal of public money in this state than in experi- mental deep borings in the geologically diverse parts of the state. Individuals have been riskingagood (leal ot money in tests for natural gas in Freeborn county and at, Stillwater. They will do good service if they fully determine the question of such deposit in those sections. 1 f there, is anything of value laid away by nature within reachable distance of the surface, it will not sub- serve its mission unless expensive chances are taken. Wagons, new.............................. All other wagons and carriages left to as- sessor's judgment. Sewing Machines.......................... K.OO Clocks..................................... 1.00 Organs and melodeons.................... 20.00 Tianos..................................... 2UO.OU Household and othce furniture left to the judgment of assessor. Agricultural machinery was also left. Steam threshers, new.....................nou.oo Horse power rigs.......................... ajo no Dogs....................................... D.oo Motion to adjourn made and carried. JUIlNllOBEUTSON, II. Sec. Chairman. A Sound Legal Opinion. K IlAlnlirldiie, llunday Ksq., County Ally., Clay Co., Texa-.. siiys: "Have, used Kiel-trie liilt'ers with must Imppv results. Jlv in-other also was very Inw with Malarial and Jaundice, Imtwas cured by timely use of this medicine. Am lalt-licd Klectnc Hitlers saved his Jlr I of Horse avu. adds a like testimony, saylnu: lie positively believes lie would have died, had It not been for Kleclric Ellis' Weal remedy will ward oil, as well as cure all Malarial Diseases, and for all Kidney, l.iver and Stomach Disorders stands uneiiualed. Trice nor. ami f I at Wcdjje Karhnis The New Discovery. Yon h.ive heard ami neighbors talking about it. Vou may yourself he one of the many who know from personal experience just how Rood a thine ft is. If yon have ever tired It, you are one of Its staunch friends, he- canso the wonderful thins; about it, is, that when once Klven a trial. Dr. King's New Discovery ever after holds a placo In the house If you have never used it and should he allllcted with a conirh, cold or any Throat, Lung or Chest trouble secure a bottle at once and Rive it a fair irlal. It Is miaranteed every time, or money refunded. Trial Bottles Free at Wedge Barlow's Drugstore. Scenery of Pugct Sound. The scenery uf Soiuul, (hilt great inland ;irm of the sea in the, extreme northwest corner of the United States, is becoming more famous [or its beauty yearly, as the munlier of tourists through Unit region Placid waters, verdant timbered mountains and snow- crowned peaks combine to make landseupe.s of nmrvelom beauty. That body of water is also of special interest to our people because of the selection of a site there for a nugo navv 3 ard for the better defense of our country on the. Pacific coast. Due of the grandest views in that region is that of Mount Haker, as seen across the still u aters of Admiralty inlet, as the main arm of the sound is ('ailed. This is the subject of a beauti- ful tinted engraving, inches in issued as a supplement to the April number of The Shore The number also con- tains many of Port Townsend and OI.Miipia. An> one seeking nifoniwtion about Oregon. AViishmtrton, Idaho. Montana or J'ntish Columbia, will find The West Shore the best' source from to obtain it. Semi cents for a copy (subscription to I, .Samuel publisher, I'ortland, Oregon. Letter List. of letters remaining uncalled for In the post olhee at Albert U-a, Freeborn County Minnesota, for the week ending April L'T, (JKNri.KMKN'S LIST. Uollcf Thykeson, 1 T. A. Lewis, Kmed Olson, in SPRING ------IVOAV jYRHIvmO AJf------ J J. W. SMITH'S, The Leader in Dry Uoods. French and Domestic Satteens, beautiful in design and finish, just the thing for early Spring wear. 1 Toile Du IS'ords, Seersuckers. Choice (Hnghams in great variety. 1 White Coods in Check and Stripes. Flounnings, Embroideries, Black Silk Flouncings in Spanish and Chantilhi at 91.25, S1.50, Sl.vo, 82.00, 82.50 and Just in, a large assortment of Ladies' and Children's Ilosenes. The goods are Guaranteed Absolutely Fast Black, And Stainless. Xo humbug. Goods taken back if. not as represented. A Job Lot of (beautiful Ribbons' on sale this week. Trices low. Corsets llucliings, Laces, Linen Collars and Cuffs, in large assortments. 1 am making low prices on all Woolen Goods, to close out and make room for my Spring Stock. One thousand yards of new Carpets just in. Uny now before the advance. Yours for Good Goods and Low Prices, J. W. SMITH. Agent for Butterick Patterns. Ceorge llurd, Arthur Harrison, W. Hartman. Andreas Olson, Ole Pelerson. Kri'dOKlmlia'J, LIST. Miss Ada Anderson, Miss Sophia Hanson. Parties calling for any of the above letters will say giving date of list. To obtain advertised letters will cost l cent. Doit K. STACY. P. M. Horseshoeing. Having taken the shop formerly occupied by C. (justavson, opposite the National Itouse, Clark street, 1 am pre- pared to do horseshoeing antl bl tick- smithing in all its branches. Special attention paid to fractious or lame horses. All I ask is a fair trial. Satis- faction guaranteed. M. DONAHUE. EDWARDS, Madson Christenson, Blacksmithing, Horseshoeing, and Plow Work. The making and Reiatrlw ot Well Tools a Specially. Shop opposite KnterutlM Office. lEWSPAPERr NEWSPAPER!   

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