Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Albert Lea Evening Tribune Newspaper Archive: December 19, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Albert Lea Evening Tribune

Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Evening Tribune, The (Newspaper) - December 19, 1946, Albert Lea, Minnesota                                THE WEATHER Wanner Friday. THE EVENING TRIBUNE NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS Special Correspondents Report Happenings in Surrounding Area (Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press) VOLUME XLV1II NUMBER 298 ALBERT LEA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1946 16 PAGES SCENTS Churchill Raps Action Of Laborites WOl Call tor Vote Of Censure When Parliament Reconvenes LONDON, Dec. Churchill today accused the labor government of "'tyranny, conceit and and announced he would call next month for a parliamentary vote ot censure on his charges. Churchill's announcement came as Prime Minister Attlees' party announced new plans to boss Brit- ish farmers and prepared to take over the country's rail- way system. As leader of the conservative opposition, Churchill said he would parliamentary debate to arraign the government when the lawmakers reassemble Jan. 21 after a month's Christmas holiday. Want Censure Vote A vote of censure is not so severe as a vote of lack of con- fidence, but its passage would amount to almost the same thing. If carried it would force either a change of government policy or resignation of the government. However, the more than 60 Laborites control percent of Parlia- ment's 640 seats and Churchill's motion undoubtedly will be defeat- ed decisively, as was a previous censure motion. Stay Off Dangerous Lakes, Safety Council Cautions Alarm over the way residents of Albert Lea disregard warn- ings about the danger of crossing the ice of the lakes here was expressed by members of the Albert Lea Safety council at their meeting held last night in the city council chambers. The Lakes have not been declared in condition for crossing nd the members pointed out that, actually, "the lakes never are what -ou might call safe in the winter ime." Insist on Crossing Ted Lifeson, police chief, said a 'Oliceman ''chases kids and grown- Legislation just introduced will authorize extensive supervision of farming, and guarantee prices for many crops. It provides the gov- ernment can take away the prop- erty of farmers who refuse to abide by official advice on how to grow things. The bill is part of the parliamentary social and industrial "Revolution" promised by the La- bor party in 1945. House Votes Rail Ownership Government ownership of rail- was virtually assured by a S62-204 vote on second reading of the nationalization measure in the Commons last night. While the measure still faces a third reading in ably some time next amount to little more than a formality under the usual parlia- mentary procedure. Victory For Laborites The vote last night climaxed three days of debate during which the government's program was bit- terly assailed by the conservative opposition, backed by a number of liberals and liberal-nationals. The issue was decided on Btraight party lines, with labor presenting a solid front, but parlia- mentary observers noted that the vote showed the heaviest participa- tion of Commons' members in sev- eral years and marked the first time in this parliament that the opposition had totaled more than Bowling Alley Operators Here Pay Fines Operators of the two bowling alleys in Albert Lea were fined re- cently in Justice Teter's court for two violations of state labor laws. August Johannsen, operator of the Town Club, was fined for employing boys under 16 as pin- setters and was fined for em- ploying minors after 7 p.m. Reece Shanks, operator of the Bowling Center, was fined for the first offense and for the second. The fine for the Town Club was higher because complaints had been brought against it before. The fines followed an Inspection on Dec. 11 by A. E. Malmberg, inspec- tor with the division of women and children of the state industrial commission. Miss Florence Burton, chief of the state division, told the Tribune today thai Malmberg found five boys under 16 working at the Town Club and two under 16 working at the Bowling Center as pinsetters in violation "of a long-standing state law." Similar violations were reported here in January. ups off the lakes every day." De- spite- the fact that the lakes are jpen in some spots and the under- current makes the ice precarious, persons have been cutting across. Earl McFarland reported that he situation of 'teen-aged young- sters driving recklessly around the high school "has improved consid- erably." Posts Notices Supt. J. John Halverson has post- ed notices in the schools caution- ng young drivers. At Carrier's motion, the council went on record commending the city for putting sand barrels at slippery hills for the use of both drivers and pedestrians. Lawrence Allen was unanimous- y elected president of the council ast night. Myron Wold was elect- ed vice president and George Gil- ?in, secretary. Their names were submitted by le nominating committee, headed ay Ed Carrier, and promptly adopt- ed. McFarland is the outgoing president. 200. Edin Attacks Plan Anthony Eden, Britain's wartime foreign secretary, concluded the conservative attack upon the measure by declaring that its pass- age would be "nothing less than a major national disaster." He as- serted that the only justification for the bill would be greater operating efficiency and lower costs, but de- clared the government had failed to show how this result could be achieved. Herbert Morrison, president Of the council, replied that the which also will bring trucking firms and other forms of commer- cial transport under government permit "a bold and G. M. Chairman Sees Price Jump If Wages Climb BOSTON, Dec. 19 Alfred P. Sloan, chairman of the General Motors Corp., asserted flatly today that wages could not be raised without Increasing prices. He told the Boston Chamber of Commerce further "the idea that a wage increase is justified soundly by an increase in living costs is an economic absurdity." "Such a Sloan said in a prepared speech, "can only resul as a matter of fact, Is re- an unending spiral of increasing wages and prices. "The only sound attack Is more and more production with In- creased efficiency, hence lower prices through the competition of an expanding volume of goods and services." Calling 1946 a year of "great economic Sloan said in appraising the business trend for 1947 the main question was "wheth- er production will be permitted without interruption." "At the he added, "I am of the belief that somethiing like the 1946 (strike) pattern is likely to prevail although I hope in modified form." Schools Study Consolidation Bilbo Denies Getting Any Part Of Fire Destroys Mill City Elevator; Loss Johnson gives his three-year-old daught- er, Patricia, a long, tight hug as they were reunited at Los Angeles folio-wing Johnson's arrival by plane from their San Diego, Calif., home. The child, reported missing Tuesday, was found in Los Angeles in company with a man who identified himself as Darold Neal R. Hoff. 23. (AP Wirephoto) Child Stealer On Probation considered program flevelopment." of transport Fire Officials Not Named Yet Residents of Albert Lea won't know who the new flre chief and captain are until about the middle of next week, LeRoy P. Harloy, city manager, said today. Mr. Har- low wants to take time to study the reports of those who qualified and to get the results of the health examinations. Girl, 13, Risks Her Life to Save Tot CHELSEA, Mass., Dec. A 13-year old gill who unhesitat- ingly risked her life by diving un- der ire to save a five-vear old tot was hailed as a heroine today. The girl, Theresa di Fiore, and Herbert Kodis, 20, already had braved the chilly waters of a clay pit In nearby Revere to rescue two older girls when Theresa div- ed back, swam beneath the Ice and returned with Patricia Brooks, aged five. The trio had broken through the thin ice while sliding. Gasoline Price War In Des Moines DES MOINES, Dec. Des Moines motorists were reaping benefits from a local gasoline war which dropped the price of gaso line an average of about cents a gallon. Most service stations were quot ing regular gasoline at 16.9 cents a gallon including tax and high tes at 18 cents. Freeborn Districts Discuss Petition to Care For Children Children too have been a good crop in Freeborn county in recent years. In fact, in the vicinity of the village of Freeborn, they are overcrowding the school facilities. For that reason and because teachers have been hard to get, folks in surrounding school dis tricts are debating a plan of going n with the village to build a arger structure. Planning to circulate a petition or the consolidation are districts 0, 11, 15, 21, 63 and 113, all of which have closed their schools, nd 16 and 98, which still maintain chools. The petitions must be signed by at least 25 per cent of the resident ree holders in each district to call an election. When the petitions have been submitted to the county uperintendent, it will become his llity to set a date for the elections. The voting will take place at one dace and one time. The superinten- lent is required to set the date of voting within ten days of the filing of the petitions. Ten days posted notice is required. Freeborn District 12) residents will not par- .icipate. "We have had only six or seven pupils in our Anton M. Olson of District 10 said this morning. "I think there are more now. There may be fewer later. Hiring a teacher for so few at present salaries Is expensive." "We folks nearer to Hartland would like to see a high school said John Madson, "and, I think, some at least would be will- ing to help provide it. Of course, Albert Lea probably has the best facilities in the county. But the Albert Lea school may have about reached its limit, too." Built to accommodate 200 pupils, the Freeborn school now has 310, John McPherson, superintendent. SAN DIEGO, Calif., Dec. Neal R. Hoff, 23, charged with child-stealing three-year-old Patricia Johnson, was released in custody of a brother, Myron, Wed- nesday on assurance he would be placed under psycopathic observa- tion at the Sawtelle Veterans' hos- pital. Municipal Judge Eugene Daney, in approving hospitalization for the former U. S. Marine corps' flier, continued the arraignment to Jan. 23. Representatives of the Ameri- can Legion appeared with the brother in behalf of Hoff, father MINNEAPOLIS, Dee. spectacular fire, with leaping Humes visible from the air as far as 250 miles away, destroyed the barley-tilled Union  y F. T. Newton, Mississippi con- ractoi- who shared in numerous big war jobs. Ferguson broke in with repeated questions about why Newton had given the to Bilbo. Trying to Re-Elect Doxey Bilbo -said he was trying to re- elect Wall Doxey, present Senate in a chute. Call All Firemen Off-duty firemen were called back to their stations as the flames roared through the 50-year-old wooden structure. Commercial air- plane- pilots reported they could see the fire at Fargo, N. D., 250 miles to the northwest of Minne- apolis. and at La Cros.se, Wis., about HIS miles southeast of the city. Firemen had to lay hose for about a mile to obtain water. They were handicapped by the nlno-degree-above zero temperature which made the hose unwieldy. Grass fires a half mile away, started by sparks carried by a six- riiile-an-hour wind, diverted the fiie-lighters' attention before they were extinguished. U. S. Offering China Credit to End Civil War labor-management relations. The, President said he Intends to slate to Congress in clear nml under- standable terrrii any changes he mny want in labor laws. Senator Bush field ni-SD) said It Is his feeling that Congress will iave to tako some action to "equa- Ize" bargaining power between tho unions and management before there can be any assurance of the ml tint rial peaco the council indi- cated Is necessary to keep produc- tion rolling full Want. Hog Prices Drop For Third Day CHICAGO, Dec. 19 -Ml Hop- dropped for the tlilr-1 i on- j day today, res' lung new WASHINGTON, Pec. I'nited States dangled an un- touched credit before the government and people of China today JIH an Inducement to estribliHh pence and unity in that land of Civil War. In what he termed a reiteration nml clarification of this govern- ment's policy toward China, Presi- dent Truman said yesterday the 1'riited States still believes it Is of "utrnoHi Importance to world peace" that there, be a united and democratic China. Ami, Mr. Truman told reporters ho hopes the credit to China nan not been endangered Hut ho said he did not wish to make a definite statement on whether 1 Is in Jeopardy. Diplomatic experts figured he meant that this government Is going to hold back the export-Import bank loan to China until nil threats to world stability there are eliminated. Six Negroes Die In Hotel Blaze lows since removal of OTA cell- Ings. Slumping 25 to 50 a hun- dred qualify at a top of 2" rornpared i with a record top of oatub lisbfd earlier thin year. PHILADKLPHIA. Dec. 19 Six Negroes were burned to de.tth last night and more, thnn 40 In- jured an flre gutted the first floor of Abe'H hotel, a low priced fonr- story structure In smith Phlladel- phia. Child Drowns As Mother Trims Tree ONTARIO. Calif.. Dec. 1') Happily. Mrs. Luther Fasllng dec-orated a Chrlptmas tree for her d.tughter, Karen Ruth, 2. Then she went to call her. She found fhild, police said, drowned In a fish pond. State Luxury Tax Faces Legislators ST. CLOT'D, Minn Dr-c Tho Minnesota legislature, when it nieptrt In January, look lo luxuiv taxes for Uie state's needed Increase in jevenue. I.awtence M. Hall. St Cloud reported today. Hall speaker of the house for four teimt. Is mentioned as the lea.lint' possibility for reelection as speaker. Hall rejected the idea that a sales tax would bo considered by sergeant at arms, as Senator and the Doxey backers were badly in need of funds. When Ferguson wanted to know every detail about what was said, who got the checks, where money was put, Bilbo sat back IB his chair with disgust. "Senator, you are a reasonable Bilbo told Ferguson. "Do you suppose any man can sit down and cite a casual conversation more than four years old." Never Got "I'd think you would remember any time you got Fergu- son shot back. "I probably would if the was for Bilbo replied quick- ly. "Jt was for Wall Doxey's cam- paign." Bilbo said he had not selected the names of those who were attend the political "pep" meeting raise funds and support for Doxey, but that he had made a "hot speech." Ferguson wanted to know how long after this the group went back to the hotel room where Bilbo got the "You did not allow them to cool off did Ferguson asked. "They don't cool off when I talk o Bilbo came back as the crowded with, spectators aughed. Raps Ex-Secretary Lashing out bitterly at an ex- secretary whom he declared as a 'Judas Senator Bilbo declared today it is an "old South- ern custom" to give presents to public servants. Bilbo denied before a Senate War InveHtigating subcommittee that he had sought gifts or funds, "with the possible exception of the money that I borrowed to make a property settlement with my ex- vviCe." The subcommittee is inquir- ing into his relations with war con- tractors. In a word statement, "the man." Bilbo heaped invective upon his former secretary, Edward P. Terry, who testified against him yesterday, and on former Rep, ROBS Collins, a Mississippi politi- cal foe. Poor and Heavily in Debt Bilbo said the evidence to date showed that "1 am a very poor man and heavily involved in debt and that I received during all the period that the investigation has covered but two Christmas gifts, one an automobile and the other living roon-. furniture consisting of a soft, three floor lamps and two tahlo lamp's." Tei ry tolfl yesterday of present- ing a now automobile to Bil- lio on behalf of Michael T. Moi> rissey. a war contractor. In his statement. Bilbo declared these, gifts came "from real friends and they without any strings or obligations whatso- ever." Custom of South "In fact as to the car It has been a custom not only in sippi but throughout the country legislature. He cre-nod liquor and cigaret taxes and tho instigation of luxury taxes ni the tax solution. The luxury tax would apply to such as am now taxed by the federal government such as jewelry, luggage and other similar Items, Hall believes No Increase on state income tnxofl will forthcoming be prophesied. to In- I fo presents to citizens who been honored by their peo- ple he. said. Bilbo referred to his, former "ec- reUiry. Terry, as "the modem Ben- edict and a "Judas ot." He ad'led' "I do not know whether to pity or bUinft because I Bometimen tbink 'hat he has a mental of tm.iginarv grandeur and to pos- sible halhK-inattoM."   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication