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Albert Lea Evening Tribune Newspaper Archive: April 2, 1912 - Page 1

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Publication: Albert Lea Evening Tribune

Location: Albert Lea, Minnesota

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   Evening Tribune, The (Newspaper) - April 2, 1912, Albert Lea, Minnesota                                w TO ADVERTISE Keeps Your Business Crow- air "Ad" Today. EVENING TRIBUNE OUR JOS PRIHTIM6 and Bookbinding la the us and see, votxv ALBERT LfeA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1912. NO. 105' LLOYD C. GRISCOM. Suffers Operation as Result of Acute Stomach Trouble. L C. GRISCOM OPERATED ON Formej- Ambassador to Italy Victim o< Stomach Trouble. New York, April C. Gris com, former American ambassador to Italy, underwent an operation as the result of acute stomach trouble. He resigned a year ago as chairman of the Republican county committee be- cause of iil health. Mr Griscom is resting easily. The attending physicians say that his con- dition is very satisfactory. FEARS EFFORTS TO INFLUENCE THE JURY Court Issues Warning in Sen- sational Damage Suit. PLANS EXPRESS CMrnneroft Jtynmission Has Zone System of Charges, WORKING WITH COMPANIES Chicago, April Pomeroy publicly called attention to attempts that are being made to influence a verdict in the damage suit of Miss-Esther-Mercy "against Dean Marion Talbot of the University of Chicago. The court issued a -warning while Harry Pratt' Judson, head of "the in- stitution, was on the stand explaining why the plaintiff had been dismissed Witnesses, as well as others interest- ed in the outcome of the litigation have been made the targets of anony mous letters that are both insulting j and threatening. The author shows a bitter attitude against Miss Talbot and the univer- sity. The court fea-ed attempts might be made to reach the jury in this All of the talesmen, however, denied receiving any of the missives. Despite the fact that Judge Pomeroy ordered a'l of the letters suppressed for the tirje being one of them, -which recipients describe as being similar to all the rest, fell into the hands of a reporter The author will be sought in due time, but nothing will be done for the present because an extensive investigation might result In a mis- trial. A woman is supposed to be the au- thor of letters and suspicion points toward'owe of two particular women who have made themselves more or less conspicuous at every session of the hearing. STOP SHIPMENT OF COAL Duluth Dealers Are Holding Anthra- cite for Home'Trade. Duluth, proportion- ately has larger stocks of coal than almost any other city in the country, outside of the producing points. It was reported that the mine operators have sent a request to all larger cities in the country for consumers to cut clown their consumption of coal wher- ever possible. While the need of economy exists !n Duluth also there is no danger of any res'dents of this city suffering from the cold until next winter at least. Duluth has sufficient bituminous coal on the docks to last until June 1, if it is carefully conserved. Duluth dealers have quit shipping hard coal nut of the city and what is left will be kept for the local trade. SAILOR Says He Got to Kill Indianapolis and Interstate Commission Have Practically Arrived at an Un- derstanding Regarding More Equit- able Rales and Better Will Approximate Charges Under Parcels Post Service. Washington, April inter state commercp commission and the express companies, of the country havte practically reached an agreement as to reforms to be instituted in the expiess busmess." These reforms will be of farreaching importance and will it is predicted, revolutionize the entire express Diisinese of the country. The new reforms include a simpli fled form of receipt, a system that will prevent express companies from charging at both ends, and extension of delivery limits" in many towns and cities and several other suggestions of relief advanced by commercial or ganizatious and shippers generally throughout the country. But more important than even these' reforms v, ill a system of express charges, n-hich "the interstate com- merce commission is now working on. The commission has evolved a zone system of charge, which, it is said, will approximate the charges under a parcels post service tn this country. Concerns Oppose Zone System. It is believed now that the proposed zone system of charges is the only fea- ture of the comprehensive readjust- ment plan contemplated by the com- mission that the companies will con- test. The commission, however, has the right to name teasonable rates on the express business" and it is going aheafl with the_ firm determination to bring about a readjustment of the tariff schedules "in a1 way that will be fair to the companies and ,the public alike. The new reforms, have developed from a suggestion by Interstate Com- merce Commissioner Lane that repre- sentatives of the commission, the ex- press companies and the" shippers get together and try to devise some meth- od for away with the gross s buses that heretofore have been prac- ticed by the conipanies. Since then tnere'have been confer- ences between members of the inter- state commerce commission and rep- resentatives of ;the express companies and the reform program has now reached a point where its acceptance practically is assured. Thousands of Complaints Filed. When the commission undertook its investigation of the express companies thousands of complaints had been re- ceived alleging practices, double charges, arbitrary lates and regulations, unsatisfactory delivery service and many other faults. The commission detailed a score 01 of its experts to go over the books of the express companies and they brought to light figures that seemed to surprise even the express companies themselves and compelled them to admit that reforms were ab- solutely necessary. It was shown, for instance, that one company in a single day had made undercharges and overcharges and another had made under- charges and overcharges in twenty- four hours, there being in this total overcharges. Commissioner declared if the federal government would prosecute every overcharge made by an express company It would bankrupt and put out of business every company in the United States. He estimated that protests' had been received by the interstate commerce commission Group of Typical German Striking Miners; Policemen Guarding British Coal Properties, WOOL BILL GOES THROUGH HOUSE Twenty Progressive Republicans Vote With Democrats. PAYNE MOVES TO RECOMMIT J. E. RANSDELL. Introduces Bill in House to Relieve Flood Conditions. Phot's by American Press Association. The national coal strike in the United Kingdom, which has been for several weeks, has rendered nearly 3000000 workers idle, made thousands'dependent upon charity to kesp them from starving and throttled many man- ufacturing Industries. Nearly a half miller. aMasre are involved, In the strike In Germany. There have been conflicts between the police and the strikers everywhere. The lower picture was taken at Wood Pit, Haydock. near St. Hel- ens. It shows the British policemen on guard at a where there had been n serious affray. They had' been on duty all eight and had built a flre to keep warm and shed to protect-them-from the rain. TWO MINES KEEP WORKING Diggers Are to Receive the New Scale of Wages. Indianapolis, April only ex- ception -o the genera' suspension which came to the notice of the coal miners' officials here was in two rail- road mines at Ind., in which the men continued at work with the understanding thpy are to receive the new scale of wages No trouble has been reported from any district and pump men and other men'required to keep the property in shape for a resumption remained at their posts tlic same as over a holi- day. Edwin national secretary treasurerr of tnc miners, says the Cleveland contract, whpti ratifh-d, will provide the highest wages ever paid to coal miners of any country. against this practice alone. The commission is 'confident that the plan which it has now devised will result in making the express rates intelligible to the average citi- zen and will do away with the system of overcharging. Woman. Portsmouth, N. _ April 2 NtcoisTa sailor, who was arrested here Saturday on a charge of holding up a bartender to get a drink, has con- fessed, the police say. to the murder of Dr. Helen Knabe at Indianapolis some months ago. Nicols says he did the need at the Instigation of another, whose name he declines to give. He asserts he was paid to do It, according to toe police story. Nicols Is twenty-two years old and has been in Portsmouth on several aslons.' the last time REVERSES COMMERCE COURT interstate Commission Wins Victory in Supreme Court. Washington. April signal vic- tory was won by the interstate commission when rhe supreme court of the United States decided the comrnirtfon had the power to com- pel water lines to report to it regard- tug intrastate fls well as interstate business, ft was the first rase from tne commerce coiirt to. Considered by the supreme court and the com- merce court WAS reversed. GENERAL GRANT NEEDS REST Commander of Department of East Goes South for Health. New York, April General Frederick Dent Grant, U. S. A., com- mander of the department of the East, has left his post at Governor's island and has gone South to recover his health. This announcement was made by lieutenant Marion Ilnwze, General Grant's aide-de-camp. The_ announce- ment follows: "General Grant was run down In health ani not feeling strong. Upon advice of his physicians he took a leave of r.bsence and has gone South to obtain a rest. He pui posely left no address." The departure of General Grant with his family from Governor's Island gave rise to reports that he was seri- onsly 111. REPUBLICAN LEAGUE TO MEET Delegates to Gather in Chicago Dur- ing National Convention. Washington, April Hays Hammond, president of the National Republican league, addressed a circu'ir to the clubs in the league. ie- qnestlng that be iukeri to elect delegates to the twelfth biennial con- vention, which be held in Chica- Washington BUI. mysterious -murder at j by Indianapolis. He I commission, last vuv'; for visit friends. Ov. on April senate judiciary oomtnittee ordered favorably reported the employers' liability workmen's compensation bill as employers' liability Senators Bacon acd ft- WILL ACHIEVE HIS OBJECT COLONEL PLANS ANOTHER TOUR Roosevelt Will Make Trip into Southern States, VIGOROUS] SPEECHES COMING Principal Addresses Will Occur a Louisville, Ky and Parkersburg, W Dixon Says Colone Will Take Up Subjects Which He Has Left Untouched So Far and In timates Some Strong Phrases Will Be Used. Republican Leader Endeavors to Have Committee Instructed to Report Mi- nority Substitute, but Fails and Measure Is Passed Without Amend- ment by Vote of 189 to Democrats Oppose Its Passage. _ Washington, April Demo- cratic wool bill passed the house, to 92, with twenty progressive Repub- licans voting for it. Representative Rucker of Coloracjo, who opposed it in debate and answered "present" on the roll call, and Representative Fran- cis of Ohio, 'vho voted against it, were the only Democrats who did not line up with the majority. Representative Payne moved to re- commit the bill with instructions to the committee to report the Repub- lican substitute, but that was lost, 169 to The eight Republicans from Min- nesota voted for the bill. Representa- tive Hammond, the lone Democrat rom the state, also voted for the bill, of course This is the first time in many moons that the Minnesota dele- gation has united on a tariff bill and he vote of the nine members trorn the state excited a good deal of comment Representative Hanna of North Da- kota, a regular, also sided with the Democrats. His colleague, Repre- sentative Helgesen. who is ill, would have voted for the Democratic woo1, revision had he been present. Representative Burke of South Da- kota stood with the main body of the Republicans against the bill. His col- league, Representative Martin, who is in South Dakota, was paired against the measure. Two lowans With Representatives Haugen and Hub- bard of Iowa and Norris of Nebraska were the only Northwestern progres-, slves, aside from those from Minne- sota, who cast the'r lot with the Demo- crats. The other Republicans who voted for the, bill were Representatives Akia of New York, Jackson, Murdock and Young of Kansas, La Follette and Warburton of Washington, Lafferty of- Oregon and Kent of California.. Supporters of the bill declared it would not cut the government's reve- nue, but woiild save more than a year to consumers because of the readjustment of rates. All at- tempts of the Republicans to amend the bill to increase the rates were lost. The tariff board came in for criticism during the speechmaking. Representative Kitchin charged that Senators Smoot and Warren had de- liberately imposed on the tariff board to maintain the high dnty ou PROPOSES GOVERNMENT AID Bill in Ccngress Appropriates 000 to Restrain Flood. Washington, April relieve- flood conditions in the Mississippi val- ley Representative Ransdell of Louis- iana introduced a bill to make an emergency appropriation of The money would be made available" immediately and utilized in recon- struction and maintenance of govern- ment levees on the river. After consultation with Colonel Townsend. nreside.iu of the Mississip- pi river commission, the chief of .en- gineers, General Bixby, declared that unless something was done by con- gress immediately to enable the en- gineers to handle the situation a astrous fkod of the country along lower Mississippi would be inevft FLOOD LOSSES WORST ON Immense Damage in Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky. St. Louis, April The floods .this section of the country, including., Illinois and ara. worst on record. Property loss' already run into the millions- the has Oyster Bay, N. Senator Dixon of paign manager. Y., April Montana, his cam- Colonel Roofeevelt Experts Believe Captain Scott Will Reach South Pole. London, April the" latest word from the British Antarctic expe- dition under command of Captain Robert F. Scott left the explorers Still miles from the South pole Photo American Press Association. JOHN HAYS HAMMOND. go Juno 18, the date upon rWhich Republican national convention as- sembles. The league convention will consist of six delegates at large from -each from each it Is esti- mated tr-at aboi.T delegates will be in attendance. state and four delegates congressional d rict and TWO LOSE LIVES IN CAVRN One Victim Was Prorrifnent and Wealthy Stockman. Great Falls, Mont., April Ackerlcy, thirty-three years a Tan 3 experts here are strongly wealthy  st known mapped out the campaign which he is to make ibis week on his tour of the South. Senator Dixon spent a few hours here, coming from York on his way to Vermont, and after leav ing Sagamore Hill said that Colonal Roosevelt make "some big speeches" on the trip. The principal speeches are to be de- livered in Louisville, Ky., whither the colonel goes at the request of Edward E. O'Rear. head of the Kentucky cam- paign, and in Parkersburg, W. Va., In response to an appeal from Governor Glasscock. The senator said Colonel Roosevelt would take up subjects which he has not touched hitherto in the campaign and that they would be phrased in a vigorous manner. Colonel Roosevelt's next trip follow- ing that to South will be to Pitts- burg, where be will apeak on Monday or Tuesday of next week On tba fol- lowing night he will speak In Phila- delphia. Within a short, time after the PIttsbnrg trip the colonel Is to go to Boston and Concord, N. H. Later he will visit Maryland. Senator Dixon said the campaign was prtrceedtas in a way that most satisfactory to him. was "How is he cried, "that sheep growers in Washington are able to raise wool at one-twentieth of a cent a pound and in Wyoming, according the board's report, a pound costs 13 Representative Mondell replied that wool costs 15 cents to produce in Wy- oming "And returned Mr. Kitchin, "this infallible board shaded that cost price Just cents. The gentleman's estimate discloses the beauty of the system. _______________ TO PASS MEASURES Senate Democrats and Progressives May Unite. Washington, April have been In progress between Sen- ator Martin, the Democratic leader, and Senatoi Cummins, leader of the Republican insurgents, giving promise of a coalition which will pass various compromise tarUf bills. This program is fraught with great importance to the political future of President Taft and the Republican party. The Democrats and insurgents are not averse to placing the president at the political disadvantage of vetoing tariff bills on the ground that they were enacted without accurate Infor- mation for the tariff board. President Taft believes that his vetoes will not injure him before country and he has adequate and time to ex- Vlain them before Import Tons of Potatoes. New York, April thousand tons of potatoes, the largest shipment ever received In New York, arrived from London on steamship Minne- haha. Roughly are enough of them to supply meals for an adult. As potatoes were quoted here at per bag of 168 pounds the sbipmrmt Is valued at more than 000. government collected in duties. Washington, April Representa- tive Cox of Indiana introduced a bin to cut off the mileage allowances oof roprecpntatives and ferrl senators, tor.rl do 'u? 'ii. '1 Oxford Defeats Cambrdge. Pufcwey, April won the eight-oared boat race with Cam- bridge university. The race between, the two crrws on Saturday resulted In .1 to th; suarr; of l.oih s! Rain has been falling throughout tha flooded district for twelve hours and there seems to be no relief in 'slfht. Cairo and the drainage district above that city are the only dry places in that section of the country, the entire territory north and south of that 'city- being covered with several feet-of ter. The river at Cairo reached a stage of 53 feet, which- is eight-tenths of a- foot highor than previous records. stage oi 54 feet is predicted beforet. the floods subside. Large forces of men patrol the levees constantly and everything is- being done to keep the embankments in good condition. Trains are still operating out of Cairo, but in many- cases are fcssng routed over foreign." systems The Mississippi is about two feet higher than the Ohio at its mouth and is running across the country into the, Ohio. The backwater has covered the government road between the national cemetery and Mounds. Ill, to a depth.', of three feet. The country about McClure, 111.. Is inundated. Live stock is being to the hills and the people ara lea-r- ing. _ MEMPHIS FEELING EFFECTS Inundation Threatens to Deprive City of Gas. Memphis, Tenn, April With ap- proximately three feet more water reg-. istorpd as certain Memphis began to feel the effects of the flood. SeveraL, hundred families were driven from. their homes, four manufacturing con- cerns have closed: street car service on four lines has been suspended and the Inundation of one of the city's- pumping stations and gas plant is. If the latter is Memphis will be without gast STOCKMAN KILLS NEIGHBOR Albert D. Pratt Meets Death at of West Butte Pioneer. Great Falls, Mont., April me make Pratt go through the it Is alleged Peter Wagnor, well to do stockman and pioneer of West Butte, near Shelby, said to em- ployes when he saw Albert D. Pratt, one of his neighbors, toward Whom, It is said, he had held a grudge for sev- eral years, driving in the usual road- way. Taking: an automatic pistol tan to meet Pratt coming in jd upon him five tlir-s Threo-   

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