Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Evening Tribune, The (Newspaper) - January 3, 1912, Albert Lea, Minnesota                                TRADE WITH OUR ADVERTISERS THE EVENING TRIBUNE FOR RESULTS WANTCOUMN VOL. XVI ALBERT LEA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 1912. NO. 27 MAY YEl ON ADRIANQPLE Turkish Stronghold Seems Main Stumbling Block, BELITTLE OTTOMAN TERMS Balkan'Peace Envoys Desire Definite- ly to Settle Forever Their Differ- ences WitJi the Ottoman Empire, While the Sultan's Delegates Em- phasize the Enormous Importance of What They Have Ceded. London, Jan. plenipotentia- ries to the peace conference enjoyed a day of general relaxation. Even tile meeting of the ambassadors was pure- ly academic, as all agreed that the ad- vances by Turkey had changed the situation to such an extent that they must await corresponding instructions from taeir governments. That the game is being played on both sides is evident. The Turks em- phasize the enormous importance of what they have ceded, which in real- ity is only what they have lost and what, independently of the aihes, not even the powers would allow them to reconquer. The allies, on the other band, belittle the Turkish concessions, as the3r desire definitely to settle for- ever their differences with the Otto- man empire. The real stumbling block is Adrianc- ple. As a compromise a solution re specting the Aegean islands is possi- ble. Some suggest that Turkey cede them to the powers, which can decide their fate. Supporters ot this plan hint that Turkey mignl even cede the islands to the allies, as has practical- ly been done with Albania, on condi- tion that the powers pledge themselves to claim, as in the case of Albania the right to decide the status of the Aegean archipelago. The struggle certainly now will be bitter between the Turks and the al- lies. The former are threatening to appeal to oE Kurope; the. latter are threatening to resume the war. May Be Left Ambassadors. It is expected, er, that relief from this situation may result from the meeting of the ambassadors, to whose judgment probably both Turkey and the allies will submit, if they de- cide unanimously what the fate of tlie islands must be. The powers are particularly con- cerned in this question, because some of the Imbros, Lemnos and of interna- tional importance, commanding as they do the entrance to the Darda- nelles, while Mitylene and Chios bar the entrance of the Gulf of Smyrna. The remainder of the islands are still in the hands of Italy, which occupied them during the war with Turkey. If the powers unanimously ask Greece to evacuate some of the is- lands already occupied it is belie% eu Greece cbsy, as she did at Av- lona on the simple intimation of Italy, and as Servia and Montenegro did on the Albanian coast on the Adri- atic, or prepared to do, in order to please Austria. There appears to be among the am- passadors a strong current in fa-'or "f the annexation of Crete to Greece, but they assert that in exchange they should be intrusted with the decision respiring the fate of the islands Regarding -the frontiers of Albania" the opinion prevails among the am- bassadors that they will be able to strike a proper medium between the too restricted suggestions of the allies and the toe extended boundaries favored by Austria. It is reported that the Russian, Italian and French ambassadors are supporting this mid- dle course. LONG LEGAL BATTLE ENDS Widow Gets Share of Wealthy Min- neiotan's Estate. Los Jan. a com- promise reached the long legal battle over the estate of the late B. C. Ake- !ey, wealthy Minneapolis lumberman, was ended. Mrs. Clara Hood-Boyce Akeley, me widow. Who was formerly the million- aire's housekeeper, is to receive five- twelflhs of the estate, or approximate- ly half million dollars, and the re- ttainder is to go to Akeley's daugh- ter; Mrs. Florence Akeley Quirk. Akeley died at Long Beach last July and slrtce that the estate bas been in litigation in California and Minnesota couris. HARRIMAN TAX FOR CAPITOL Inheritance Fee Will Almost Build Utah's New Statehouse. Salt Lake 'City, Jan.' inher- itance tax paid to the state of Utah by the estate of the late E. H. Harri- man will rover about two-thirds of the cost of the erection of the state Capitol, wfllch bas been contracted tor. The rtarriman estate pafd the sMte nearly and this was set Mide by the last legislature as a capital fund. The building? will cost JA'MES R. KEENE. Long Illness Ends in Death of Financier and Horseman. JAMES R, KEENE IS DEAD The Three Turkish Peace Envoys to London Conference and Turkish Troops Going Home. Financier and Horseman Succumbs After an Operation. New York, Jan. 3 R. Keene, the financier and horseman, died in a sanatorium here after an operation. He was seventy-thre years old and had been ill for a long time. MEXICAN OFFICIAL VISITS PRESIDENT Assures Taft American Lives and Property Are Safe, Washington, Jan Pedro Lascurain, MesicaE minister of -for- eign affairs and personal representa- tive at least for the time being, of President Madero, came to Washing- Ion to tell again to President Taft and Secietary of State Knox the story of his government's successful strug gle with rebellions, to reassure them of its ability to protect American lives and property everyn here in that re- it was whis- pered, to find it there was a grain of truth at the bottom of recent reports that intervention by the United Spates was not merely a threat, out an alarm- ing possibility. Senor Lascurin had two opportuni- ties to talk and to listen at the "White House and he will be given an audi- nce by Secretary Knox President Taft made r.o specific de- mands upon the Mexican foreign min jster. He expressed inter- est in conditions in Northein Mexico and was assured that recent troop movements in that parf ot the repub- lic and Madero's efforts to meet with this country's desires for protection there had proved fruitful. FELKER ELECTED GOVERNOR New Hampshire Progressives Vote With Democrats. Concord, N. H., Jan. New Hampshire legislature in joint con- vention elected as governor Samuel D. Kelker, the Democratic candidate at the last election. He received 222 votes to 191 for Franklin Worcester of IIoll's, Republican, Progressives voting with the Democrats. Republicans abstained from voting on the ballot for governor. The joint legislative convention also filled four in the senate, electing four Democrats and giving that party a ma- ]ority in the upper house. The election of governor was thrown into the legislature by the failure of Mr. Felker, the leading candidate, to procure the necessary majority at the polls in November. FIVE KILLED IN A FIGHT Honduran Leaders Summon Adher- ents and (Encounter Follows. Puerto Corlez, Honduras, Jan. Five men were killed and several wounded ir. a fight at Comayagua be-_ tween the adherents of General Luis Salamanca, governor of Comayagua, and friends of Guitlermo Rerrare, a political leader. After a personal encounter between Governor Salamanca and Perrare they summoned their friends, who armed themselves and prepared for the fight. The governor escaped injury, but Per- rare wounded severely. SHIPS TO Transatlantic JLincs Shift Crossings About Sixty Milts. Washington. Jaw. navy do- partment announced thai transatlan- tic steamboat lines have agreed tw their tracks to thejwathwardjp Photographs by American Press Whether the devastating Balkan war should be quickly terminated and whether or not Turkey would submit to being deprived of territory or an enormous sum of money as indemnity were questions largely iu the bunds of tbo three Moslem envoys at the peace conference iu London. The Turkish delegates, opposed to delegates from Greece, Bulgaria, Servia and Montenegro, showed from the start that they were a mighty wide awake trio. They at flrst declined to sit iu the conference with the Greek envois on the ground that Greece "lad refused to sign the armistice. Then they insisted that Adnanople, their beleaguered city, be revicluaicd belore they would proceed on peace terms. The Turkish delegates as shown in the picture aie from left to right, Sulih Pasha, Rechid Pasha and Nizami Pasha. The picture below shows a detachment of Turkish troops with their Held flag returning home in a joyous mood after the armistice was signed From all reports the sultan's men had many hardships to endure. order to avoid icebergb, tne change to become eifective Jan. These cross- ings are one degree c about miles to the south of crossings here- tofore used at that time ol the year. It is expected that the crossings agreed upon v.ill remain in use until August unless The ice comes down In abnormal quantit cb. Pafchengers thus will avoid much clisti 'niort due to cold and heavy lurtuer north. NO STEPS TO END STRIKE New York Clothing Manufacturers Won't Recognize Union. Xew Toi'Jc, Jan, S. Efforts to sf-ttle the garmert workers' strike (ailed. The various agencies working for peace did not find a basis upon which they thought manufacturers and might agree. The Now York Clothing Trades as- sociation held a long meeting, at the conclusion of which President Kugene S, Benjamin declared nothing had been done toward a settlement. He said the employers were willing tn treat with the men, but that recogni- tion of the union would not be giant- ed under any circumstances. MAY APPEAL TO COUNTRY British Premier Hints at a General Election. London, Jan possibility or an early general election in the Unit- ed Kingdom is widely spoken of as a result of Premier Asquith's pointed question to the Unionists in the house of comment v. hen he them to declare clearly what would be their attitude if the home rule bill was sub- mitted to the electorate anc; approved The reply of Andrew Bunar Law, the leader of the opposition, that in that case the Conservative party would not encourage the U'sten'tes to resist the measure is regarded as slguu'nurit. TOOTHACHE REMEDY KILLS Minneapolis Man Swallows Carbolic Acid Through Mistake. Minneapolis. Jan. fnistaken tor toothache medicine re- sulted in the death of Albert Xannuia. Nannula had retired eat 'y but was awakened with the toothache. He told his wife he was going to take some medicine. A few minutes later his heard his A physi- cian was but Xaunnla died be- fore doctor's arrival. The coroner bas not been asked to investigate, as it believed death was Riimored Tiiat William Rockefel- ler Has Gone Abroad, SAILS FROM SOOTHERN PORT Reports in Circulation at Brunswick Ga., Declare Oil Magnate Left Jekyl Island Last Tuesday on an Uniden- tified Steamer and That His Desti- nation Is Unknown. Brunswick, (J.i J-ui. Rockefeller, wanted as :i witness bo- fore the Pujo money trust ing committee, sailed Ironi Jekyl IB land, near Brunswick, Tuesday on an unidentified ste.imcr tor an unknown port, according to repoit.i here. Accompanied by VMS wife and non, William Rockefeller, .IF well as the latter'h wite, Mr. Rockefe'ler arrived at .Te.rvf l.sland more th, n three weeks ago, according to the reports Instead of going to the Rockelcller wintei home the party got quarters in an apartment house and remained in so elusion. The apartment house Is near the handsome home of Mr. Rocket c ler. Kxtivme secrecy is maintained by residents of island regarding the departure ol the Rockelellers. The name of Hie on which they dp parted al.so has betn carefully with held It IF that Mr Rockefeller char tered a specinl A rumor aiso v.as current "hat the party sailed on the private yacht ot .a New fork snoi is-man and that their destination was Bermuda. Wi'Ham Rockefeller, whom the ser gennt-nt-arms, of the house trier! in vain to sen c with a subpoena since Inst Tune Meanwhile Scrgeant- Ruldcll ;uifi ,-i sma-l jinny of deputies and private detectives about the Now York home of the oil magnate. After laikin'' tvilh house leaders arid with Jeny South, chief clerk of the house. Chairman Pdjo of the mom-, trust committee issued a state- ment reviewing the attempts to ob- tain the testimony of Mr. Rockefeller, in which lie expressed the hope thar it would not be necessary to exert the "full legal power" of the house to get service nt the subpoena. FANATIC'S ARM IS CUT OFF PLAN TO GET ROCKEFELLER Chairman Pujo Hopes Radical Steps Can Be Avoided. Washington. .Tan. series of earnest conferences and avast amount of digpJag into dusty tombs of law occupied fbe momberrt of the house connected with the money trust In- vpstixatio-i tn thfir efforts to evolve a plan to obtain the testimony of He Says Divine Command Made Him Put It Under Car. Buffalo, N. Y., Jan Pull- man, twcntv-threc years old, is in a is conoition at a hospital here shodc and loss of blood as the of the severing of hia arm un- der the v.heulh a hulloy car. Pull- man snid he placed his arm under the 13.1- bpcati.so ht wa.s to tlo so by Clod." jnirpo.soly put my left arm undej the wheels, of a street car in order to 'invc it cut said Pullman in a (Worn statement. "I wa.s commanded by God to do this and 1 did It of my "own free will. I am not a drinking man. I knew and realised I was doing." Three Boys Drowned. Olivet, Mich., .fan. playing hockey on Pine lake, near hero, three IjoyH broke through thin ice and were drowned. The dead are George Dewey, fourteen years old; Clark Morgan, twelve years old, and Stan- ley Lansborough, sixteen years old. TEXTILE STRIKE IS ENDED Little Falls, N. Y., Men to Return to Work. Little- Kail's, Y., Jan. strike of textile workers here, which has been in progress nearly months, has been settled. Both sides claim a victory. The workers will return to work un- der the wage schedule approved by the American Federation of Labor a month ago. The strike was called off by the federation at that time and the Industrial Workers of the World have been carrying tt on since. The new schedule fnereases wages from 10 to 15 per cent. JEFF DAVIS. Arkansas Senator Dies Suddenly cf Apoplexy. SENATOR JEFF DAVIS DEAD Arkansas Statesman Succumbs Sud- denly to Attack of Apoplexy. Little Rock, Ark., Jan. States Senator Jeff Davis died sud- denly at his home here as the result of an attack of apoplexy. "Washington. -Jan. Jeff Davis left Washington Dec. 13 to spend the Christinas holidays at home and at that time appeared in the best of spirits. He had not been in good health for some time, although his rendition did not occasion his friends much alarm. On one or two occasions, his friends say, he had suffered from attacks ot dizziness. He invariably uiu'.le light ot them He has been in the senate since 1907. BOOMING MONTANAN FOB CABINET PLACE Friends Urge Governor Norris for Interior Portfolio. Trenton, N. J., Jan. Hen- ry L. Myers of Montana urged Presi- dent Elect Wilson to appoint Gov- ernor Edwin L. Norris of Montana to the cabinet portfolio of secretary of the interior The term of Governor Norris will expire Jan. ]4. Senator Myers told the president elect that Governor Norris had made a particu- lar study In all the Western and Northwestern stares of questions af- fecting their development and re- sources. "I esteem him very said Mr. Wilson later in referring to Gov- ernor Norris. "I have seen him at the conferences of the house of gov- ernors. He madfi an admirable im- pression and is very aggressive." The president elect, however, held to his previous policy of not commit- ting himself in respect to intended appointments. Senator Myers brought petitions from chambers of commerce and rec- ommendations from many other or- ganizations, urging the selection of Governor Norris. He also announced that .1. Walsh, soon to he elected junior senator from Montana, would come in a few days also to speak in behalf of G-ivornor Noriis. MANY POSTMASTERS TO GO Democrats Will Succeed Republicans in Minnesota. Washington, Jan. now and March 4, 1917, when Governor Wilson's term as president "ynfres, Republican postmasters ir. Minnesota will have yielded to Democrats posi- tions carrying aggregate salaries of J437.600 a year. This is the amount now paid by the government to the presidential postmasters in the state and It reasonable to estimate that this amount will be increased by sev- eral thousands of dollars annually dur- ing the four years, because of in- creased receipts of several of the of- fices and consequent increases In sala- ries. BAILEY MAKES FINAL ADDRESS Noted Texan Will Soon Resign From the Senate. MERCILESSLY FLAYS HEAHST Lone Star State Senator Refers to New York Newspaper Man as at "Miserable Who Had "Hound- ed Him" General Trend of the Speech Was an Attack on the Princi- ples of the Initiative and Referendum. Washington, Jan. 3. Senator Joseph W. Bailey of Texas, long one of. the picturesque figures and striking speak- ers of the United States senate, de- livered before crowded floor and gal- leries his final speech as a member of that body. Within a day or two his resignation will be laid before tije senate and communicated to Governor Colquitt of Texas, his expectation be- ing that R. M. Johnston, of Houston. will be named to fill out his term, which would end on March 4. Senator Bailey's speech was an at- tack upon the principles of the initia- tive and referendum as institutions that would, if adopted, bring about the overthrow of the present system of American government. He declared they originated in the desire of politicians to escape the re- aponsibility for action on such petty questions as the location of state capitols and the settlement of prohi- bition fights. As institutions of gov- ernment, he declared, the schemes for direct legislation by the people would. convert the United States from a re- public to a democracy and give its control into the "hands of the un- skilled, the idle and the vicious." An attack upon William R. Hearst, in the course of his speech, in which he characterized Mr. Hearst as a "mis- erable who had "hounded brought Senator Ashurst of Arizona to his feet He attempted to answer this passe of Mr. Bailey's attack apon radical newspapers and magazines, but was stopped by the Texas senator with the remark that he "could make that reply outside." Later Mr. Ashurst took the floor in his own right and in the course of his defense of the system of direct gov- ernment paid a tribute to Mr. Hearst as a loyal American citizen. Galleries and Corridors Filled. Galleries were crowded to their ut- most capacity and long lines of peo- ple waited in the corridors for an op- portunity to hear the Texan's farewell address to the stnate. To the mem- bership of the senate was added nearly seventy-flve members of the house, who filled the benches and lined .the walls along the floor of the chamber Senator Bailey spoke for four hours and throughout that time ho received the closest attention. As he conclud- ed a of applause swept through the Raiieries, bringing a sharp repri- mand from Senator Gallinger, the pre- siding: officer. President Elect Wilson, although quoted liberally by Senator Bailey in defense of his declaration that direct legislation is not in accord with the principle of American government, re- ceived only commendation from the Texas senator. "If the -man we have elected presi- dent of the United States gives the country a sane and satisfactory ad- he declared, "the Re- publican party will never nominate another candidate for the presidency. "Why should he continued, advancing toward the Republican side of the chamber. "You did not carry but two <5tites this year and those two of the smallest. The contest four- years from now will be between us and the Rooseveltians. He (Roose- velt) take some more, bnt thank God they will be the kind we can af- ford to lose. "Our conflict Is with Roosevelt. If our president believes he can take the radical -vote away from Roosevelt be Is mistaken." SENDS A COFFIN BY MAIL Makes Lid Separate Package to Keep Within Weight Limit. Zanesvfllc, O.. Jan. the flrst time In the history of the country a coffin was sent through the mails from the Zanesville postofflce. It weighed fourteen pounds and was sent by a coffin manufacturing company to an undertaker in Dexter City, O. The lid had to be sent as a separate pack- age, so that the body of the coffin would come within the eleven-pound limit. total postage was 68 ACCUSE OFFICIAL OF THEFT G. E. Fiavin, Former County Treas- urer, Held In Rapid City. Rapid City, S. D., Jan. 3. Former- County Treasurer George E. Flavin. was arrested on charges of embezzling from the funds of this couBty his term of office from 1908 to 1912. Flavin resigned office in the latter year to become manager of a company at "snanris. A year ago county offi- cials instituted an investigation ot the office and their expert reported, a shortage. Johnson and Wifo Chicago, Jan. Johnson and his new white wife, Lucile Cameron, are In seclusion following dem- onstration made sgainst ball of a of state milftin. When Johnson and ais wife stepped out on the floor to dance there was hissing from different part', of the ball. Tbe music ceased Johnson and his wife left the   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication