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   Record-Eagle (Newspaper) - February 11, 1946, Traverse City, Michigan                                BROKD'BAOUB, TBAVBM1 CITY, MICHIGAN TWO MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1946 SURPLUS GOODS GONE BY 1947 MOST ARE SOLO AT PftlCM bulk of billions of dollai's of surplus army and navy goods nil over the will be by the end of this year, For. Liquidation Commlsslonei Thomas B. McCabe said today. tome have placed the ultimate total of surpluses over- seas, as high as but FLC officials believe this figure may be too high by half. More sur goods are piling up every day however, with a peak expected this spring. In January, In the European .theater of operations alone. 000.000 worth of material was de dared surplus. Up to Jan. 19, FLC figures show the army and navy had declared .surplus materials which cost J1.6U.OCO.OOO. Of this amount poods originally worth have been sold for approximately a return of better thai 60 per cent. There remains In In ventory goods worth about 000.000. McCabe said the figure Is misleading because It represents original cost, whereas much of the material has been used. Much of It. he added. Is use less for civilian purposes. He salt1 the material fell Into two cate and "dodos." McCnbe explained, In eludes which are desirable for civilian use, such as clothing or food, and which bring high re turns. "Dodos" are at the other end at the scale. The prime "dodo" so far appears to bo the bridge the mobile, prefabricated device for fording streams In enemy ter rltory. McCabe said also that the re- turn on aircraft, which make up large part of the surplus, Is ex- tremely small. Because of a shortage of exper leneed personnel, there Is a lag of about 60 days between declaring material surplus and putting It on sale. McCabe said. The Pacific, where total surplus is expected to be more than on the basis ot present army and navy plans, presents peculiar McCabe said. These flow >ily from tha wide diversion ot supplies among small island bases, deterioration ot ma- terials because of the climate, and transportation shortage. Frequently, he said. It Is less expensive merely to abandon the property than to try to sell it. He added, however, that much ran.' torlal has been sold to private In terests In the Pacific, principally Chinese businessmen and British firms in Shanghai. TORPEDO CAR WILL BE MADE IN CHICAGO DETROIT. Feb. 'group of automobile executives pushed plans today for production of the radically-different Tucker torpedo car In the Dodge airplane engine plant at Chicago. Preston Tucker, designer the unique vehicle, announced that ne- gotiations were virtually complete the War Assets Corporation ior use of tha massive Chicago plant. Tucker said production oC the new lightweight, rear-engine car, slated to sell for between 'and will begin within six after occupancy of the Iplant U obtained. Officials ot the company, whose icapltallzatlon was not disclosed In- 'elude: I Ray vice president In 'charge of manufacturing. Rausch with Ford Motor Company years and was in charge of all Ford manufacturing except Wil- low Run. Joseph D. Burke, sales. HurUo is a Detroit veteran who hns work- ed with six Detroit manufacturers. George S. Lawson, in charge of style and color. Lawson was with General Motors for eight years. Lyle D. Mlddleton, chief master mechanic. WHS with Ford from 1019 to last year. Maj. Mark J. Mourne. La Grange, 111., is secretary, Tucker said. Tucker, who was associated witb Harry Miller, racing car maker, from 1925 to 19-11, said the new car. to be built principally of alum- inum, embodies much ot radng car design. He emphasized, however, that It was not a racing vehicle, though designed to reach speeds pt ISO miles nn hour. OTHMAN LAUGHS AT LITTLE GUYS WHO FIGURE OUT H.C1. By, FREDERICK C. OTHMAN (U. Staff Correspondent) WASHINGTON1, Feb. studious little, men in long rows .fiddle with their alide-t'tiles and make about the cost ot living on their ehai'ts; Sen. Ken- neth Wherry of Nebraska and I think they're blowing bubbles. We believe they ought to get their noses out of their electric calculating machines, actually buy themselves a guess again about the high cost living. Tlie senator told A. F. Hlnrlfihs, acting commissioner of labor sta- tistics, that his totals were screwy; that anybody kuew the H. C. L. was far higher than the official showed, I remained neutral until the last my old sorry day, went to the laundry and came back as locomotive-wiping rags. 1 had to get new ones; that or a coat ot paint. There are plenty of shirts on sale In Washington; one leading haberdasher has shelf upon shelf cotton shirts..The cheap ones I wouldn't ovon wear to a laundry- men's oyster raost, They cost 17.66 ench. They come In gravy color, streak- ed with egg cinammon drops. They are the ugliest shirts, bar none, 1 ever saw, The medium-grade shirts, a little better In quality and a little less wild-eyed shade, sell for fS.50. That's one for not four. Fool that I was, cold and desperate, too, I bought one of these. I've yot it on now. It Is the color ot a cloudy clay at sea, Just before the dawn, but with white stripes every inch. I told the man It didn't look decent, He said, no, It didn't, He said he'd show me some good shirts. I must report they were beauties. They were In solid shades of soft yellow, blue, gray, green, and pink; they had good buttons properly aewn. The material was excellent. "Ten dollars the man said. "They're going fast; you bet- ter stock That made me sore. I told him I'd phone the OPA and that Ches- ter Bowles, himself, would be over within 20 minutes to jail him as chiseler number one. He smiled a superior smile. He said he was used to hot-tempered but Ignorant fellows like me. Then, so help me, he showed me the celling price tag on each shirt. He said the reason they were expensive was because the cloth was Imported. "From 1 demanded. "From he said, "and made up special, strict- ly under all price regulations." Chasten what's going on here? Bureau of labor statistics, why don't you buy a shirt? Statistician Hlnrlchs Insisted his figures were correct except for quality deterioration. He told Sen, Wherry he couldn't take every Hem going Into his list of necessi- ties and decide whether it was worth the price, Let's take one Item; my new pair of pajamas. They have no collar, they look sleazy, and they are speckled like a pup, but pajamas are pajamas. I put on the pants and drew the woven draw, string, and bloole. It busted. I pull- ed It out and it turned out to be two one-foot pieces of draw-string. Each sewn with three locfoe stitch- es to a double-up piece ot cheese cloth. Only the woven cord show- ed: the cheesecloth was invisible. What good Is a pair of pnjaui pants that won't stay up? Ches- ter, I'm asking you. Hinrlchs, what do your statisticians figure pants like these are worth? You name the nrlcc and I'll sell 'em to you, LEGISLATURE TO CONVENE TONIGHT LAXShVG, Feb. Michigan legislators, re-convene to- night for the second week of a special session with attention fo- cused on appropriation measures. Tho lower chamber will consider :he administration appropriation lilll for tin? University of Michi- gan and .Michigan State College while Representative John P. Es- R., Eagle, chairman of the ways and means committee, has promised his committee will report out other financial bills early this wet3k. The senate will receive the louse-approved bll Iftxlng June IS for the 10-16 primary election. An- other house bill passed last week granting local units of government "50 per cent of taxes on southern Michigan land acquired by the State Conservation Department for park and recreational use __ Company Lonf Mand Cilv, V. Y. DOSSIN'S FOOD PRODUCTS, DETROIT, MICH. Gay Flowers for her coat, suit, dress or to wear in her hair Daisies, roses, gardenias, sweet peas and mixed are among the varieties in this colorful showing. Sketched Is a gardenia with comb attached at A new belt to accent her spring costume Choose from pigskin, patent suede or kid In her favorite color. Illustrated is a brown suede, set with coral stones, at Pamper her with jewelry on Valentine's Day Jewelry is always high on the preferred list for gift occasions, and pearls are favorites with young and old alilre. Shown above is a similated pearl choker at Treat her to a fine luncheon on'ValentineV Pay. Bring her to MILLIKEN'S BALCON TEAROOM Give her a cosmetic case filled with her favorite toiletries This beautiful case filled with Charles of the Riti, Rubinstein or Elizabeth Ard'en prepara- tions will make any woman happy on Vtlentine'a Day. Case alent. A Fitted Case for his i Valentine Here Is a handsome gift for the man la your life, A leather case fitted with brush, mirror, comb, manicure accessories and containers for .bis toilet articles. Jumbo size Coin Purse It's small enough to go in your purse and large enough to carry alone if you wish. Of durable calf leather. Leather Bill Fold with coin purse attached Illustrated is one of our popular-numbers with' coin and compartments for 'cards, identi- fication, etc. Others are priced from 2.25 to 7.95 acceptable with or without monogram Plain- stationery is a fine gift and her monogram makes it just a bit nicer itill! The following boxed assortments are especially nice for mono- tramming. 24 sheets, 24 envelopes. Folded to 24 sheets, 24 envelopes. Folded to 60 sheets, 50 envelopes. Sizes 50 sheets, 50 envelopes. Folded to IMPRINTING CHARGE EXTRA GIFT HANKIES A fitting gift for every lady on your list. Choose from linens, hand em- boidtred 'Swiss, lace trim, prints or initialed types. Priced from 29c to 3.65 each Special Sale at 39c A large group of hankies, tpecially priced through Val- entine's Day, Is our gift to you. embroidered whiter and white with colors are in the lot. WINTER STORE HOURS to J. W. MILLIKEN, INC. Traverse City's Beit Store Listen to Milliken's Shopping Reporter Wednesdays ana Saturdays a.m. Stations WTCM and WATT. :D   

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