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Grand Traverse Herald Newspaper Archive: May 12, 1870 - Page 1

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Publication: Grand Traverse Herald

Location: Traverse City, Michigan

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   Grand Traverse Herald (Newspaper) - May 12, 1870, Traverse City, Michigan                               MALICE TOTVA'RD WITH CHARITY WITH FIRMNESS IN THE J'' VOL. XII. to nb 3S I'UJiMSHKD AT Traverse Grand Trn verse Midi. O. AMI G-KAND TRAVERSE MAY 1870. NO- 20. JOB PRINTING. Two Dollars a Vcar ill Advance. AovKKTi-iKMKyTS for One per lor the ilirl iinei and thiity ct'iiti f.jr earh insertion.' Yearly Advortisomi-nN ijlo lot one for two 820 t'iree -quaics fnrlinlf column nnd dollars for one column. l.i'Kiil iidvr.-rtiH'.-rmTits at llic prc- scnbrd by j-ovunty per lulio ot 100 for the fust uml thirty-flu' i-enli. for each Kveiy a word. Figure WOI'H without SO pr r link-mid figure ilouMp price. AllU'gai advertisements to paid for .s'.uct- Iv in i JOB llie Publisher of the i.s hippy to an- nounce to flic that ho has oric'of Gordon's Job And n large quantity ol TIlAVJUKSsK COl'A'TV Oi'TJT- CKKS. It.UtTLKTT. KKKIHI SB oi' MASK Cor.s-rv K S'i .1 fc or S-'n. Ai'iuiiM v. Ciiici-ir CVrnr I'. Si-iivhvoit.............tt'M M.AWhO.v. HIT. Di' 11. IIAVJI.ANP. COUNTY OWICKK.-'. The wagon wanting clenixena of the Grand Trav- crse Kegioii will'do welt to CALL AND EXAMINE A RPLKNDTD JiKSORTMRNl OF HONESTLY MADE LEACH BATES'COLUMN. AND To his former Stock of or Wll.sO.v. CILL. or I. .MILLLit. Cui-.vrv CI.KUK-.........A. HU'lTAl'.K. ATI CIHI-I-JT COL-HT COM ...SKTH 0. MOKKA1T. SI-ILVKV.VII..............iOIIN liWR'fKU. liAV. KARTO.V. OF buioui.s......S. .J. UUTCIIIXSO.V. C'OlfSTY K I XTJ I. ................I. I'. KUANIt. li.VCiUT. or Iti.i.Di___HK'liAlflJ BAIiOl'. .'isKA-i-iiiiit.... KLVIX SI'KMJCK. .II-IX.K OP I'KOISATI. L. M. Corur CACIO A t i nicM.v.L II. S.MI'rif. L. WOOD. j I CJIMUOYOAN COC'M'Y ol-'l-'ICliUS SuKHirr.................Milli .M ''1C VIA. Co i NTi- I'li'iiiATK.....W.M. II. CM.UK in ...A. .f Si ISMJKUS. COUNTY f-'.HS. Ami he in now prepared to execute ali Kinds of PLAKV AND OJiXAMEXTAL 3XT T I TST in a manner that fit'-tidiuiis. the most I Hw.tuvv IIAUIU.-'O.V II. rtKI.VXICIi. II. Vv'HKKI.KH M'V I.KI'.dV I'. AMI'KXOIS. i IK I'. CIIAMI'IIVDIS. .IriK.B or I'lioiiArr.lSA AC X. lil'DV'l KK. I'RO-i. A. I'CK'll .-U.S. n. Cor HT Co'l li S H. DAVIS. FINISHED AMD TWO HOUSE O NOW UEADY 1'OR SALE AT WAGON S EC O _ l-iy Jilain 'J'ruvorsc Mich. ABSTRACT OF TITLES. We have made a complete Abstract of'Titles Every Legal Subdivision of Land IN GRAND TRAYERSE COUNTY. In preparing this Abstract we have found in the County a large number of IMPERFECT This ixudora it a matter of the highest impor- tance to TRAVERSE CITY- Photograph Gallery can now he hud lit Henry L. Miller's To mo tlmt the On RYKUY r.'dirKTY Ofi' I' Co. K. VOOIMI Kl ..'I en- Tl or Piui. ...J. I'nos. Cm. COM. K. S'I Si-i'T. oi'Kciiooi.s A. K. WAI.KKIi. CoitONim.....A. .1. KKXNV. 1'iintrd t noticenad at rensonalde rats-s. urn niiw prepared to hike Photographs eqiuil tu the Ail kiud-i of picmrorf from the to the largest. JSTG. Old Pictures Copied. RunidKi- n cooi'Kii. CI.IIUK JOHN' s. IHAO.V. IMJAI.I.S. itKii. nr Diti.DS M. J. HI OCKMA.N. oi' I'KOHATK. 1 1 1.O Itt-II-'. IIs. IOIIM.V ir. riitKMV. II. S IA.M Mll.l.KU. HOliO.MOX Cm. C'oi nr COM JM-I i. MI- Si STATION 1. A T 'i u rrrv Rl'.dlSTKK...... uBKN ciooniiiuir II. Griui'l Truvursu Co .fit.. Deputy 'I'nivcrsc Mirli. KTll Noi il C. Mtiiiiii-y at r tin- Jiunu CM Mu-li. JlvSSlO t LJoin'i'j 111. mi I'lavc'ii Truveise t'ily. Mich. jiunl to Operative 1'i ll Ki'lil Altoiiii'.v nt I'u' 1'Nllllf ll''l ilil liill'i are nlno prepaied to piiiit And all Kinds of COMMERCIAL WORK With ntiiitucsa nml di'-'piitch. flood J'iHum uarunlged it k.t.dij .Weather. Particular attcntiun ptiitl to Children's Pictures. l assortiiif-at facilitieri for K ll'T. MiiuKu M H hi AUoriK'y- li. I1'. Surveyor and Hl-itughtsuian. Mii'li. A tteiilinn lo the i-ud sale ol lands.__________ __ I. CouiiJelK--'at I l.itenlid K Agi-nL. Tith--. and We v ford ilii'li. SHM.S. lloti IIOTKI.. 'J .S. l-'rmik I'r I lirs-t eise Cit v. llk-lii- A good IMI paid to oil tv PRINTING IN COLORS hy any in Northern Michigan. NVt1 Ho the special uttontion of our I'lustotitoi to tliih ilepai tnit'Mt ot our busiru'SH. madu thobc tuUIitioiia tu our ustabli.-ih- nu'Ml lor llus purpu.-iO of KoopUiK pace with the ol' Lliu tuitl onablino our bnsi- IIHMI to secure ttnyaiul all kinds ol' n'ithont the tumble aiul delay at teiuiant iijtou sending tibroatl. NVe sluill continue Vo mid to piintlrig mate- truia time in tiino a.s thu wants of tho public may yeein to being vK-tcnniaed to keejr pnce with the uinvanl iniu'uLi of business and ibe ilev.-lopment of this nipidly improving region. Always on 39-Om U. L .Artist. CHAIN OF TITLE Gun be traced back through properly executed and recorded instruments to Original Purchasers. We are prepmed furnish Abaliacts on a few minutes at reasonable rn'.es. JLKACJE A 'I'AX TITLES. AYo give liolow n list'of Tax Titles TVC hold from the State. We will Quit Claim at low to thoso wishing to buy. we sliall bo glad to coinmunicatu with tlie original owners of the i regard to a compromise. We will relii qnish our claims to original owners at vor low or we if bu in their interests. this mutter of Tn we wish to deal i'airly and jnatly li all. 'Tis not the ninnuuring voice of spring That s-tirs my heart and makes me sing not the blue sky bubbling o'er With sunshine spilfed along earth's floor Nor yet thd flash of bursting Nor bloom of 'any flower that It is that long years ago Win n all the world was blushing It is that my check blushed My beat fast for love and you There was a music in the air I fan lind now- anywhere. And so ivhen spring comes wnndering 1 lose the thread of misery Trusting the promise of her I tune my voice to sing her And cheat myself with the sweet pain That in the Hpring lovu blooms again. Prom the Independent A. Condemned AUGUSTA 1A1USK15. Hubert on his way homo from n husking one pleasant autumnal eve- with the stars all aglow above liim and a crisp touch of frost in the enter- tained u feeling of bitterness in his which would not be whistled down or Milliner Shop at Lelar.d MRS. H. A. CAMPBELL SVonUl inrorm the citizens of Lelnncl ami vicinity that sho will opnn a Milliner Shop in t.hut on the lirst ot April. Alajxjh IH70. Millincrv Dress Making. I'ont Ollico. On lianil a good asso'tincnt of Millinery Goods. Please call ami c.xnininc. Also in'cnarcd to do g and plain scnvinfr. MRS.' It. A. MKS. li. A. CAJlPliELb. A l-'ICtirj.1 I'ARIH JKOK on the Hay shore of a mile hoitlli of Oamphell Xorlh- port. including acres ot good grass and fruit a pint and a choice variety of thnftv fruit some a nev frame house 16 24 and 21 x good cellar iinilcr and excellent spring of of S. or of the subscriber at Traverse City. 10. Pastor Baptist ChurclJ. Sub-division. ej of ni'f of of swt Lot No. 1. .swt ofnt'l nej sej of nwf n'4 ol riwi s.l of of s ol'sel ol sef of nwj of nef Lot No. wj of se.i swf net of set 20 2H afi 0 1 1 I 7 HI 19 19 2H 31 4 25 20 20 9 12 5 24 T. 28 '27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 '27 27 27 2.3 20 2.5 27 27 25 It. W. Acre U 10 n 11 n 11 n 11 11 11 11 u 12 13 14 14 14 15 bO bO M 40 40 07.0 20 40 40 36 SO 100 100 160 ICO 1 GO 40 ICO T. T. Notary Public and Xiccnsccl Conveyancer REVENUE STAMPS. A FARM Of 100 cm town 27 norll range 10 7 miles from Traverse Gity Eighty .acres improved. Good log house Frame etc. First rate land. TV by streams and springs. Aboil 100 acres balance rolling. balance on time. No. A THU SI'ATE A farm of SO ncrOR 3 miles from Traverse Cily on the Tiaverse and Midland State liond. Thirfy acres cleared and under log house Ins bam and triune etc. About fruit trees. Surface level. a good loam. Ac. Well wittered. A first-rate place. balance on time. No. VAK9K PO1VKR Merc'iaul front Ti.ni'i-u Sli'.li. All neatly anil inninplly executed. A choice ntent ui and cuustantlv on Uami. Lion to oll'i'i- the fanners it. One of the Dlt. C. W. Knint .iiitiiors of the e hook has been Secretary of How to Make the Farm believe the book the above litie to be jubt btiok the InnuL'rs need. flhey do not long scientific but plain practi- cal imtounation Mali as lill.s tlu.s voluiiR'. How to make the l-'ann is just what our want to I.IKMV. If any one by long experience and careful cxpciimeiila i cully any uil'nuaa- Mich. PHI tit ular atten- tion 3iven to the preservation of natural leeth. ArtiiU-iiil teeth all the lute mi- pi ovc meats. l-ly Att ty. Jlich. Ollico of Olic-bovsnn. T ly siKloiitlrit Attoiacy at haw and Couti- of and 'M.iine Sis.. Ollice. other and re-JitU-iiee of rn-1 in pei-son Mondays aud H. K. STKU'AUP. Tn-a-mi-i-. Traverse Oet. ISi'.'.L .VI Ijil'o and Accidcni Inbiiiance of Hart- Conn. Home Piie Insurance Co.. of Kuw and the Phoenix Kre I iisiminco of Conn. At the Post Office. E IV. Attorney it Coun- seUn-ut iVc. mice Agent. Collections promptly nude reasonable. imper-i neatly and tu-omptly executed. Tii-les luxes pur- chases made. Mich. 10-1 V Doctor one door insat of the Guntan Will uttond to nil calls in Traverse and any n liars in tills 1 December Masj-aehubctth State .Hoard of loi nearly and every iinpiovemeiii upon old has bt-en made the subject of oareful inquiry. The other names wo see in tiie preface are those of the prtu-lical Agricul- tural mt'u in the cutiutij. The result is iliat we luivc a with the hue-it and most fcnmathm upon every subject connected'with llie dim-rent chapters treat o I Utuin- 1 llrasses. Hoot ypeciill Rotation ot Bwinu and other Domestic Animals. 1-Yuit tli-ape GuHuie a.id Small Ilise.ises and I-'ann L'.uHu- Market and ninny other items It a liiui co lection of liecipes for cook- j i ami n cliaptir on the ordiuaiy dlaeiises lor the i Uie f.imily plain and simple remedies. tile u'hole n most complete nnd should he in every farmer's house. The book is handsome cnoiifih for the table aud durable enough for a general ion. There are one hundred aiul fqity-one line tllus-j not mere pictures but instructive and useful to the of the toil. SVe uu- dersiand that tlie agentf who pro eaiivai-sing in othei ale nu-utillg with gieat success and li list thnt the farmers in our own.county I will soon have a chance tu secure tlii- work. to Make the Farm oi-tlio Farmer's book of 1'ractical by C. C. I'Miut and albeis. iMcCurdy ik and St. Mo. Floral Guide for 1870. The lirbt edition of one hundred and twenty thousand copies of nV'.lV Jllustratfil Ctitnlofjiie of anil Vloral IP nnil leaily to scn.3 out. H is ele- gantly printed on tinted with.about '200 iine wood EnBiiiviujts of Flower's aiid-Vugetn- bics. and n beautiful Colored seven vaik'tics uf IMilox making u line J30TJQUET PHLOXES. It is the most as well asj.be most in- ve Floial Guide ing plain and thorough directions for tho Culluru of and Vegetables. The Floral Is published for the benefit Of my t.o whom it is .scut free without but will bo forwarded to .ill who ap- ply by for Tun which iV nm half tlie cost. JAillilS 4- i f N. v. SOMETHING NEW NEi Pec. Town 32 Range S 100 acres ol' splendid level and well timbered. acres cleared and 3 more chopped. Comfort able log lionsif. This land is only one quarter milo Intermediate anil has two first- rate mill 'sites wltlrlH or M feot head. Price only one-half down.' No. HOlfSJE JLOT. Ou State between Boardmnn Arc. and Wellington being Lot Block 12 of tlic Village Plat. one story 20 x SO with kitchen addition. Price VERY liberal terms will be mado' as regards time. No. 141. A VtlXR FRUIT FARIM. On sections and T R 11 Srj bordering on the 12 miles from Trav- erse Cily by land and lOj miles by water. 60 acres frame story and a 18x28. Frame barn '2i x 30 and Cone shod 11 x Well at barn and house. All kinds of small frnils in abundance. apples hearing. A locution at once convenient and delightful. En- tire cxciirption from frosts. Sl.OOn balance ou time. No. Mkh. v T--.T Cr'R I C31-TJOXT TRAVERSE MICH. .n KPA mnra AT SHORT NOTICE. Shop in Allen's Blacksmith near Hol- burds' Store.' Work 8-1 IHT WKXPORD IS'.J of nei section towc range 12 101 acres choice farming Innd unimproved. County Line Koad on north side. Soil first class. A desirable lot. Pi ice only No. A I'AKM Off1 144.40 Being nwfli sec. town 27 north range 12 Tj miles west of Traverse City. First ratu sandy surface 25 neres and 25 more good log house. Price balirace in 2 and 3 years. No. 135. and For sale. Price of the Report 75 cents. Price of tlie Hap alone 50'Cts. ejectud'from the patched toes of his old as ho valiantly breasted tlie steep hill road. He looked abend to where ho could sec a of tall cut- ting into tho sky ivith the air of ready to dispute the and life at tlltit moment seemed like such thoroughly up-hill did not try to eiti- mntc the value of the pines were on the Dearborn or let his mind run off into vague calculations of much straight stuff could bo got out of provided there had been a mill-site on the or tiny funds in tho fami- ly coffers for setting up a business. tVlthough tho neighborhood where Hu- bert was born and hud always lived lay less than half a hundred miles from u great tlie tide of improvement and innovation had eddied round and left it more deeply rooted in dogged preju- dices and old-fashioned ways than over Thu sleepy gray with tlicir protuberant ovens aud antediluvian roofs ind seemed to get smaller nnd lower every as if they were slowly sinking into thu that smelt of sage and and flhimtcd gayly their poppies and hollyhocks. llusking-bees were still considered orth- adox amusements for young nnd .hat very evening a gay party had assem- bled in Squire Palton's barn and it is a little singular that a young manlike Hu- bert Dearborn should have gone home in i of thu considering when the red ear was lie hail kissed Bes- sie Spinner. There was nothing acciden- tal about and Bessie htid blushed down o the tips of her and ex- jericnccd the queerest sensation he had over felt. Bessie Spinner only a little lailoress it Kcdwood Center. Sim made pants and inen coats by the dozen on her sewing- and .sent them to the oily in charge of a friendly who re- turned her a package of equal bulk the next .where she stood waiting on the station platform. Bessie had a very old arid exacting mother to take rare and the wonder was with long hours of stitching to get and a bed-ridden invalid upon her she did not lose her bloom and young and the nrat ways Hu- bert so much admired. lie had never fairly known that ho was over head and cars in love with Bessie Spinner until tlmt kiss touched his lips like an electric and telegraphed the news to his heart allliough many a in his longings for a home aud fireside comfort such as he had never Hu- bert had wandered away to a favorite knoll by the and looked down on the willow-fringed and away at the dimpling blue Bcathaway and pic- tured to himself the cottage he would build and somehow it was always Bessie Spinner who was flitting about the rooms and twining vines over the low windows. as he thought of with the so- bering influences of thu crisp air and the hill road upon it seemed impossible that this should ever come to pass. .Most likely be was doomed to spend his best days scratching to small purpose on the old farm while sweet Bessie with a face like a into a bloomless old forever bend- ing over the sewing machine. Ahead of where ono solitary light glimmered from the Dearborn there Mras nothing pleasant or cheerful in the prospect. Lie could dimly remember a far when tho homo acres were spoken of with as yielding full and when there was thrift and plen- y about them but a change for the wor.sc had gradually beun taking and now the old buildings were rotting down for want of half the fields were fal- barns stood fences were uid the stock had been thinned off until only a few starvelings remained nibbling on the brown pastures. The neighbors generally believed that old Zachery Hubert's and partially lost bis in country was means any- thing from the mildest form of lunacy to 'aving madness. There was an shifting expression to the pale blue eyes of the spare old man and people would how many years' back ho began to ncg- ect his farm-work and run into unsafe which left him out of utterly his mania hnd taken a turn for Miying all manner of useless lumber at luction-sales in the where he went once a and the garrets md sheds of the rickety old house were crammed with every species of nondescript from a ship's figurehead to a dam- iged stock of patent medicines. Expos- ulation and entreaty could do nothing vith the old man. Ho was childishly san- there ain't a she rocking back and forth in a chnir with a particularly exasperating and 1 should think you'd be the last man on earth to ask such a tired and dou'ti .want to said the old man is no better than trying to a dry cow. But 1 can't sec why a .man shouldn't ask for what he wants in his own if that will fill the replied Sirs. tartly. never was used to skimping and scraping the bone till I came to this house. At wo had everything and were as good livers as need if anybody hus a right to 1 guess I not a blessed shoe to my and you lient on making me and helpless children said the old put- ting out his hand. heard that tune so often it buzzes in my head like a At the moment Hubert opened the and old Znchury's gray face bright- ened up at thu sight of him. he cried eagerly. glad you've got home at for I want to tell you about my strike. It was a condemned and I knew the moment I put my eye on lying there on tho there was money in the. thing. It was plain the bidding would be plagucy so 1 got a friend of a bigger man than 1 to keep close to the aud have it knocked down to me at any price. 1 know I've got hold of a fortune this but you won't any of yon believe it. think the old man's and the light all faded out of his face and he let his stubbly chin drop into the hollow of his tremulous old hand. Do hear how he keeps agoing put in Mrs. creaking her chair more energetically than ever. 1 declare to it's enough to rile u and if me and my children ain't brought oil the it won't be his fault. How can you sit there and harkuu to him Hubert Dear- Whal is it all con- demned you know Miid not heeding his step-mother and determined to show some kindly interest in. the old in spite of tho effort he mado to bear patiently his folly. my he his listless face growing animated in a mo- ment. You don't think your old father is a fool do you father. It's fair lo suppose 1 don't think any Mich Von are like your 1 lube.'' And the old man got tip and went and smooth- ed Hubert's curly brown hair fondly wit his shaking I've dreamed of he three nights and if she lived things would have gone better wit for she always respected my boy Of I've made mistakes in my tim men are liable to but they may sin what they Old Zucb's judgment i as sound us a what about con downed be said the old ening up. Jt was condemned by tin ovoiseers of a factory because it wouldn' bear high or something gave out with a little it's my opin ion thuvu isn't a sounder tho country. Mteam-ingine cried Mrs. Dearborn you don't pretend to say you'v gone and bought an O Lud next thing he'll be leading home an elc Hubert himself scarcely strove to sup press a pitying sort of .smile over old man's delusion. Aren't you little thnt they have palmed ol on you a lot of iron nm such Those auctioneers know lion to play tho humbug game thoroughly they have laken in very sharp people before sir I'1 cried the old bringing his hand down on tlie table until the dishes rattled again '.here isn't any humbug about it. 1 know enough of ma- chinery lo sec with half an eye there was money in the thing. Vou may look at it yourself and you will say the for you have inherited my mechanical turn. All the Dearborns have Three days with much pain and creaking of and rutting ot tlic condemned lot was drugged up from thu somewhat distant am dumped down in the chip-yard of the Dearborn strewn already with ev- ery species of distracted looking litter. There it a black inert under the beautiful October sunshine. Hubert out of tlie barn and went on whistling as he stopped before mysterious with his hands deep- buried in his pockets. Tt was true what the old man had said. Hubert was possessed of a invent- ive faculty and at one time he had eager- ly read every work on mechanics upon which he could lay his hands. as ho looked at the old as torpid as if it had. 11-3vor known the wrath of Jlnino and the llmig began to come out nine thnt each successive bargain was _oing to make his until it arrived n the limbo of the Dearborn farmhouse lien he forgot all about with his ild unrest upon turned his city- to commit some new piece of folly. S'o then that Hubert skcp- ical and hitter in life as he attempted to ook a little way into the knowing iOW terribly the old place was burdened nth debts and mortgages. as he approached the crazy old ho saw through the uncurtained vitcheu by the light of a flaring allow his who had arrived and was sitting at a table-leaf opened gainst the side of the house and sparsely proaei with eatables. Isn't there a mossle of butter or a sup f milk in the the old man to make this dry crust of read go down a little My teeth re most you and I can't chew s well as I once the person un- tdy with'a great shock of reddish the old man's second much oungor than himself. From this ill-as- ortcd marriage had sprung a brood of as they are little ing their mother's redundancy of hair nd tiie house'with clamor. Hop- ily- they were in bed and asleep. intelligently under his and his fin- gers ilchod to handle the bolts find all working harshly from rust and disuse. Pretty however the whistle died from olf his lips. He had got absorbed in liis occupation. It was cortnin 'ho ohl man was not so far out of the after all. With some skill and money spent upon the condemned engine could be mado to run. Thus much he knew for himself. It was of tho portable kind used for mechan- ical and there were curtain parts but lion down in Binnt- who had worked in u boiler could tell him just how much it would cost to replace and undeisland just how the power ought to be applied. Up in the carriage-house loft there was a lot of cross-out and circular saws the old man had bought of Aleiid when he sold out and moved West. Hubert remember- to the ivpst chamber nnd peering 'through a cobwebbed window she could see thnt bu kopl on toward Sijuirc llrs Prissy Celt in her bones sometbing was and Ifubii't evidently need- ed close1 willing. At last the morning arrived when Uio old man -was to set out OH his weekly visil to llie lie had grown fidgety arid and liis little bundle was made up in his hand. 1 guess I'll walk over cross-lots llie station with said assuming 11 careless tone. Thu old man expected a and would rather have gone but ho could not very well refuse his son's com and the two fared forth together tbrough the smoky October haze. Mrs. Dearborn left her dishes cooling in the and leaned her bared elbow on tho window-sill to take notes as passed down Long toward the where the maples were blushing scarlet and the beeches wore a crown of glory. Every motion of Hubert's had become to her now and she noticed that talked earnestly by the and made gestures as if laying down the law. They stopped against a and the 'old man ap- peared to listen attentively and then they went on and were soon lost in the shadow of the trees. Toward nightfall the two 'came back to Mrs. Dearborn's unfeigned as- although Old had brightened tip and seemed younger than for years she could get no satisfaction out of him concerning his re- except Unit he had changed his mind. That evening lather and son repaired to the square dreary catchall for one tallow and such meager writing materials us came to Ittind. Although tbu door was. looked on ihe whether by means of tlie kcy- lolo or the chimney I cannot Hrs. Dearborn discovered thnt some sort of a paper was drawn up and signed tho lext day when her lino theory of llubert's HirpHude in getting his imbecile father to sign away the thereby defrauding ler and her children of her wae jowled down by a frnnk avowal that the jiysterious document contained nothing but a partnership agreement between iDuai'born who proposed to forth- ivith establish a steam-mill upon thu prom- Mrs. Prissy considered herself a uinch- ibused woman. It came that Squire JJalton had promised to furniiih money on a new mortgage. One of the low uselass burns was to be turned into the the other might in time become a snsh and blind factory. a month after that everything meant business about tliu Dearborn place. .Hu- bert had skilled workmen up from tlie although Joe Smallweed thought lie wis bossing the nud old Zuchory witli a glow of triumph in. his wuiv pottering making long-wimlec speeches on tlie fortune his bargain hue brought in spite of the general opin ion Unit he was a crazy-brained old fool There was so much bustle and excitement at home now he forgot to make hi.s perni- cious visits to and discontinued them from that time altogether. At the end of some absorbing the old engine was practically test' and found to comu up most sun guinc expectations the saws once set ii eating their way through the heart of a great log which had been haul- ed down from the ljuic nearly succumbed. Nothing hut tbu strength ol his constitution saved him from n course of fever. The mill stood not many rods from tlie and tho sharp whizzing and of ils machinery could be distinctly hear by passers-by. The effect was biglitened Kni-rcnMetl Product I on' olT Iron. These free trade1 men iu their tions need as careful looking after do' the Democrats in their figuring 'the' debt hitd thc'cxpeViditVres'bf'the'' Government. To p'rove-thatr tlwproduc-' tion of iroii 1ms been as revenue and free trade tariffs as under tho present the Chicago Tribune says The existing tariff on iron 'in its'' vari- ous forms is from 50 to 100 per ad valorem. The tariff prevailing -froui 18-10 to on the same was 30 pet and from 1857 to 24 per cent.' Under tho operation of tho' ta'riff.of. the production of pig iron in this increased .at tho of 63 per eent.-jpKT an- and under the tariff of 1857' at the rate of'Ct per per annum. The' duetion in tho year 1800 was 3n the first the highest ad valorem duty ou iron under the present' tariff is neither fiO nor 100 per -but 45 per cent. In the second the. production of pig iron under thu tariff of 1846 Jwas not 62 per per nor wiis the production of pig iron under the tariff of 1857 61 per per dnaitim. According to the figures of 31 r. Wells' report 1808 which is free trade authority ihe pro- duction of pig iron was as follows Instead of the increase being 62 per cent. the increase was only per per annum. The following is the' table in Mr. Wells' Irom which the probably took its figures. In order to.show it has perverted Imvc emphasized the years which it gives as tlic annuttl per of increase. Toni1. Vcars 1B-IO ISoO 1S55 IbOQ No. of Per cent. TBN PiVO 3 It 61 Now tlie years from 1840 to 1850 were not the decade under the of jut the years 1840-55 were nearly so. In that decade the annual. increase wus not 03 per as the. Tribune This misrepresentation could mrdly hnvu buen Mr. Wells remarks immediately afterwards that during the last thirty tl'io in- crease of production him been lit the nver- ige rate of 8 per per or more .ban double the ratio popu- Vot in' the very face of the Tribune deliberately puts thu innii.il production at sixty-tito per cent. Let us see what the production under tho j resent tariff bus f-which went ipcrnlion in 1004 into by a painlcd in clear hcarin_ these Steam Sawing and The old as they came jogging along with produce in their long-bodied let their horses slacken into a and stared at it with unfeigned atunzememcnt. if tlmt don't beat was the usual before tlie off horse was touched up with the snapper of the long whip. the tiling prospered. Black who had engaged to run up bouses in Jjruntford before the following contracted for all the lumber Dear- born Sou ceuld run out in six months. I filbert was hard pushed with and tbu past hud begun to seem almost like a when one day close on the edge of he was startled by hearing ol the lenth of old ilrs. Messic's mother. The day after the funeral he snatched an hour lo run over to Redwood and sill on Bessie. She was in her mean little dressed in a cheap mourning .vith the sowing machine shut for one nit of respect to the old wonuin'H IIKMII- ed them now and he paced slowly round the and put his hand to his head with the feeling a man has when he hard- ly dares entertain his own thoughts. When the call came for quite contrary to tho young whose tastes were by nature somewhat dirl not remark on the slovenly condition of the or the unwashed faces and tousled heads of the younger children. whose curiosity was up lo the average of her noticed his ab- straction nnd a certain suppressed excite- ment about him that he could not fully control. Fn the afternoon she let her bread run over the to watch Hubert go out with his best coat on and fake the road to a pretty town for sum- mer residences which was springing up on the railroad some two miles away. He did not return home until after and Mrs. happening to be awake in tho middle of the heard him rise and open his although there was a stiff northeaster blowing at the and the thought came into her head that perhaps he was getting like the old man. It must run in the blood. During the following and tlie one that came she had occasion to notice that Hubert's abstraction rather increased than diminished. Ho was unsocial and solitary. Two or three times he took the road to the Pine and by going up in- Uome out nnd take a walk with said 1 after the fir.st greet- ug and a few words of condolence. Jt ivill do you They out under the deep blue and picked their way across he spongy- where blackbirds vere beginning to to the banks of he willow-fringed with thu bright ScaUmwuy Hills in the distance. This is where J am going to build my said Hubert. stuff a all out for in the mill yonder and I hink it i.s about time I have a home of Jiy responded .Bessie i ear you are growing but i have found means to vork and thank God. shall lear all about tlie condemned lot K Bessie. It's a curious story. J3ut rst 1 must find out if you will come and hare my little house with me else i shall fail in the heart to build it. J have never hud a to call such and I have pic lured a hundred male ing the little cottage 1. meant to build if God prospered as bright us Bessie put her hands up before her and began to tremble. But Hubert softly drew them and when it was all set- he can always make a place for the old man when he wants to can't JJo will be an harmless asalittlo will love you right away. J'oor old Somehow he missed of affection and fireside comfort lie needed them and it told sadly on will do all 1 can to bring him a bless- said with glistening eyes. those children up that are running nnd cherish remembering that our own childhood was not quite so happy QB Vein-H. Tons. US 1808................................. limited. Under the freo trade tariff of 1810 .the annual increase in pig ironi was per not 62j iis the Chicago Triliune while uridcV'tfio tariff of the increase has been' 100 per or an average annual increase of -JO per and at the close of this year will bo 14.3 per or an average annual increase during tho six -years -of 24 cent. Mr. Jauies a Now Vork Demo- recently complimented the Tribune as haying more influence with the-'pcoplo than forty Congressmen. If it is with that class of Mr. Brooks' constituents who arc accustomed to hear of tho National debt as ranging from five to ten billions of and the expenses of Grant's ad- ministration as anywhere from .two to three thousand millions par Post. lioiimVnt. Prom Hie New Yoik Tribune. We assume that tho Senate will not se- riously at not successfully at- tempt to overrule tho decision of the House for the next the num- ber of Hep rcscn tali vcs in Congress slmll bu with such additions only as tile idmission of new States from tiuie to involve. These will hardly exceed live in or one each for and as they shall severally bo admitted. assume Hint Mexico will bo admitted at this HCH- so that her member will bu one of the In the following table 1. The total population of each us returned by the census of 2. The estimated population of each Slate accord- ing to the census about to be 'J. J'lic number of its present .Representatives 'n 4. Tho number to which it vill probably be entitled under tiie new census. We think this will vary but one each from the actual number in any ind not at all in most instances. it might have Trnn snir bless said fervently and he. raised her hand to his lips and kissed it with reverence. writer in the Mxaminer'anil the Baptist and Methodist churches of Philadelphia were Thirty years says a about equal in number. Now there are Baptist 00 65 Pres- and 70 Episcopalian. He thinks the Methodists show greater tact in keep- ing themselves before the as illus- trated by the fuct that last year the 40 Baptist ministers married 480 while the 60 Methodists married iainc llninpHllil-e Vi'rinont Conniictfcnt.. thoiJe Ibluiid. Vew York ____ 3.8H0.727 Jersey... Penu Virginia... .T-M.OJO Virginia N. Ourollnn... K. Carolina... fieoi-Bia Ohio Inrlmim Illinois WiHuoiioin Miniieiinta ____ Iowa H48 MlaHOurl Kaunas Nebraska Delaivnre Maryland Kentucky Tdimessi-e ____ Alaliuma Mississippi Arkaiimis Louisiana ____ Florida Texas talifornia ____ Nevada Orctoii New Mexico.. 32 I'rolmlilo I'o 200.000 350.000 1 400.000 aOO.OOO 150000 3' I 10 2 31 5 24 3 8 7 4 7 19 H K C C 2 4i 1 1 1 a 10 a is 4 3 4 1 3 1 1 3 1 10 I 33 y 7 fi 8 13 13 IV a u 4 8 11 3 I 1 C 9 8 7 C 4 e i o i i i 241 Sn.un- RKTMOT. The following clcrer retort from Henry Ward Beecher is taken from tho last number of the New York DKAH MK. I linvc just a curious letter from ind I give it to verbatim Owosso 1870. 'I have heard of a man wbo wrote let- ters and forgot to sign his but nev- er before met a case in which a signed name and forgot to write the' Icttjer. H. LKT Us Tnv IT. A celebrated physician says if people would eat the phosphate of ime contained in instead of throw- ng it as they now do in n two or three generations men and wo- men would be j- nnd have better teeth. Let' try-it   

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