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Saint Joseph Herald Press Newspaper Archive: March 11, 1960 - Page 3

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Publication: Saint Joseph Herald Press

Location: Saint Joseph, Michigan

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   Herald Press, The (Newspaper) - March 11, 1960, Saint Joseph, Michigan                                Paife Two TTTE HERALD-PRESS. ST. JOSEPH, MICH. Today's Benton Harbor News See Quick OK School Bonds Ex-Harborite Is Wanted In Grand Rapids A former Benton Harbor man is wanted by Grand Rapids police for armed robbery. Benton Harbor police said they received a radio message from state police at Paw Paw to pick up Everett Raymond Scruggs. 27. Dels. Oliver Slater. Jr, and Ho- ward WUlmlng questioned rela- tires of yesterday but to locate him. Scruggs has a crimes dating He was Approval by the Michigan Mu- nicipal Finance commission of Benton Harbor's J600XXX) school bond Issue Is expected next week, over a month ahead of schedule, i Of petty Assistant School Supt. Harold to 1950 He Crocker said the commission has I htre ta February of 1954 for approved the Benton Harbor driving away an auto schools' request for "emergency1 treatment" so that bonds can be told before May 15. The bond issue, approved by voters last Sept. 29, Is expected to pass the finance commission without Crocker said asked for emergency treatment because we have a Community college capital out- lay, state-matching application that much be completed by May 15." he said. The emergency processing for the Benton Harbor bond issue is expected to result in commission approval next week, cutting five to six weeks from the usual pro- cessing time. The bond issue will raise JBOO.- 000 mer a four-} ear period for capital improvements, and 000 ot er a three-jear period for current operation expenses The J600.000 will cover cost of 10 elementary classrooms, ad- ditional space at the junior high school and Community college, plus extra library facilities In the senior high school. The five-mill tax will cost the voter six cents a day or less, Crocker stated. Demands Exam On Check Count Willie Eugene Nelson, 20. of 1160 E. Main st, Benton Har- bor, demanded a preliminary ex- amination when arraigned be- fore Judge Elizabeth Forhan in Benton Harbor municipal court Thursday on a charge of utter- Ing and publishing. Benton Harbor police accuse Nelson of cashing a bogus check at Al's Gulf station, M- 139, on Feb. 24. Nelson was com- mitted to Jail In lieu of a bond. Three men pleaded guilty of drunk charges. Paying K fines were Gustav Granite, 52, of 511 Granada st, St Joseph, and Fred Radke, 46, Benton Harbor. Committed to Jail for 30 days In default of a fine was Albert Denton. 31, of 255 Morton ave, Benton Harbor. Mercy Hospital ADMISSIONS Patients admitted to Mercy Lee From Trip 'Mr. and Mrs. Lee Dustin. 660 West Napier ave. Fair Plain, are back- from a six weeks' mo- tor trip to Southern points. "Their itinerary Included stops at Mobile, Ala: Biloxi, Miss; Baton Rouge, Liberia, and Bay- ou La Batri in Louisiana; Hous- ton and El Paso Texas; and Bisbee, Tucson and Phoenix, Ariz Highlights of the trip was at- tendance at the Golf Course Su- perintendents' Association's Na- tional convention at the Sham- rock Hilton hotel at Houston. Over 2000 superintendents and their wives were at this event. Mr. Dustin has been superin- tendent of the Berrien Hills Country club's golf course for 37 years. While on the trip hi played golf almost every day, something he is too busy to do here. hospital, Benton Harbor, during the past 24 hours were: Surgical Benton Harbor Mrs. Roger J. Maurer, 350 August dr.; Ron- ald Yemngton, 520 Sunset dr.; Frank hWite. 687 East Main St.; E. Allen Zachary, Jr, route 3; Bobby Joe Taylor, 351 Summit St.; Robert Broadwater, son of Mr. and Mrs John Broadwater, 1610 Berrien ave; Gerald Long son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Long. 801 Waukonda ave. Coloma William Veit. route Eau Claire Mrs. George Pope, route 1. Medical Benton Ren- barger, 669 Columbus ave; Mrs. Caroline WakefleW. 578 Ed- ward ave; Mrs. Ollie McCoy. 2302 East Berg ave.: Mrs. George Mayfield. 2080 Empire ave; Mrs. Willie Ewell. 167 Pipestone st; William Caldwell. son of Mr. and Mis'. Sam Caldwell. 1183 Broadway. Coloma Mrs. George Pudell. route 2; Connie Griffith, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. William Griffith, route 3 BIRTHS Benton girl weigh- ing five pounds, 12 "4 ounces was born to Mr. and Mrs. Claudius Rucker. 669 East High st, Fri- day at 4-44 a m. A boy weighing four pounds, seven ounces was bom to Mr.- and Mrs. Henry Rock, 527 East Main st, Thursday at 8 02 p. m. A boy weighing nine pounds, 14 ounces was born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Baise, 352 Lincoln ave, Thursday at a. m girl weighing eight pounds, 15 ounces was born to Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Schin- ske, route 1, Thursday at 10'18 a. m. DISCHARGES Benton Bodtke, M-139; Mrs. Clara Foust, 1283 Superior st; Terry Hamilton, 744 Riverside ave: Tommy Hess, 589 Cass st r Mrs. Jesse Johnson and twin sons, 621 East High st: Joseph Melle, 468 Pipestone st.; Frances Perry, House of David; Miss Alta Sawyer, 381 Summit st: Mrs. Duane Schneider, 690 Jakway ave; Mrs. Frank Urban, 1015 Douglas ave.; Miss Lela Wells. 380 Broadway; Michael Williams. 466 Pipestone st St. Thomas Fogle and son, 723 Jones st Lyman Bittner and son, route 1; Gary Batter- white, route 3 Eau Earl Hart- line W. Davis. L. Peterson. Pastor's Father Will Speak At Harbert Church HARBERT, March 11 preacher at the morning worship tmice (or the second Sunday In Lent at the Harbert Community church will be the Rev. Emil R. Bolln, superintendent of the Central Conference of the Evan- gelical Covenant church of Amer- ica. The Rev. Emil Bolin Is the father of the Harbert church's pastor, the Rev. Arnold R. Bo- lln. The guest pastor has served churches In Buffalo. N. Y, St. Paul, Minn, and Moline. 111. Prior to his pastorates he was In YMCA work in Chicago. A graduate of North Park Theo- logical seminary, Chicago, he has served In his present capacity since 1949 The topic chosen by the Rev. Margaret Lyle Hospital ADMISSIONS Patients admitted to Margar- et Lyle hospital during the past 24 hours were: Surgical Benton Harbor Carolyn Slrk. daughter of Mrs. Otis Nel- son, 410 Ohio st. Coloma Kenneth Weater- 'ord DISCHARGE Benton Harbor Karen and Ethridge, 2021 Hatch st. Blind Girl Risks Lite, Aids Rescue PHILADELPHIA, Mar. 11 Blind. 17-year-old Theresa Hayes was anxious that her parents mow she did not fall In the per- formance of her duty. That's why the slim blonde stayed at her braille-equipped switchboard Thursday, risking her life to help save 329 students at the Overbrook School for the Blind when a fire swept the main building. "I thought It was my duty to stay at the switchboard to bring u much help as I could reach to Mp the nurses rescue the chil- she said as she shrugged REV. EMIL BOLIN off acclaim as a heroine. I Felt It Was Dnty Bolin for Sundays sermon Is All of the students were led to We Would See Jesus.' FRIDAY, MARCH 11.19W Herkner Panelist Robert Herkner ol Herkner, Frailer and Smits. CPA. Benton Harbor, will be a panelist on -Ibe Certified Public Account- ants' Small Business Problems when the Southwestern chapter of the Michigan Assn. of Certl- ted Public Accountants it p. m March 24 In Gales- >urg. WANT MENTAL HEALTH the financial need for children's mental health in Michigan before a special program sponsored by the AAUW and the Michigan Probate Judges Assn. to gain public support for these funds were, left to right, Dr. R. D. Rabinovitch, director of the Hawthorn center at Northville; Miss Madeleine McConnell, chairman of social economics issues group of the AAUW; Dr. C. M. Schrier, medical director of the Kalamazoo state hospital; and Berrien Probate Judge Julian Hughes. (Herald-Press Photo) Urge More State Aid To Fight Children's Mental Problems safety but Fire Lt. William Adgie, 42, was killed fighting the blaze Six other firemen were Injured. "I smelled the ex- plained Theresa, "but it didnt bother me. I thought It was my duty to stay at the switchboard. "I heard a big bang and the sound of breaking glass and some firemen shouted at me to get an ay from the switchboard I had no feeling of danger and stayed there until someone pulled off my headset and drew me from my chair. Cause Of Fire "Then a matron who was lead- Ing some students by the board took hold of my hand and di- rected me out the main en- trance" Joseph G. Cauffman, principal of the school, said the fire started In the third-floor bedroom of one of the employes who had been smoking. During the sen-ice, the Rev. Emil Bolin will officiate at the laptism of his grandson, Brad- ey Karl Bolln. son of the Rev. and Mrs Arnold R. Bolin. Soloist at the service will be Mrs. Dayle Weller. Twin City present tj EHID lACKOtD March 11th 12th P, M, St. Joseph Junior High School Local Economic Growfn Topic Of Toasfmisfresses Mrs Jack Spicer was table topics master at the Spotllghter Toastmistress club's meeting at Holly's In Benton Harbor. Every member spoke on the day's topic, giving her own ver- sion of "How to Encourage Ec- onomic Growth in the Twin Cities The rest of the meeting was devoted to Lesson Five in the 17 weeks' economics course spon- sored by the Twin Cities Cham- ber of Commerce and directed by Edwin B. Kellogg, Its assistant secretary. Mrs. Victor Miller was discussion leader for the lesson which was on "Government Con- trol In Free Enterprise Lesson Six will be presented at Withholding Tax Repeal Proposed By Texas DAR AUSTIN, Tex, Mar. 11 Ul Repeal of the federal withhold- ing tax as a first step toward wiping out the federal Income tax was proposed yesterday by the Texas society. Daughters of the American Revolution. Other resolutions approved by the society's 61st annual con- ference advocated withdrawal by the United States from the United States from the United Nations, limitations on trials of cases Involving this country be- fore the world court, reductions In foreign aid and stricter train- lug against Communism by the armed forces. The delegates went on recorc as opposing federal aid to edu- cation and further opposition to civil rights measures. Hits Parked Auto And Flees Scene Bernard Leroy Stevenson, 34 rt. 1, Bemen Springs, complain- ed to Benton Harbor police tha a hit-and-run motorist damagec the left side of his car Thursday while the vehicle was parked on Second street near the Intersec- tion of Territorial road. Plugged Chimney Smokes Up Home A plugged chimney filled the Charles Williams Jr.. residence 432 Lincoln avenue, Benton Harbor, with smoke at a m. Thursday, according to Ben ton Harbor firemen No fire wa reported. next Wednesday's meeting and the following week the annual) The loose-flowing outer gar Spring Speech Contest will be.ment worn by ancient Romans held. I was called a toga. Make that date at... SCO1TS Famous Steak House and Crystal Bar FEATURING: ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY Dance to the music of Eddie Wilson and his Keynotes, Friday, Saturday and Sunday till 2 A. M. Organ and Piano music during the week. SCOTT'S Famous Steak House Private parties and banquets by reservation. U. S. 12 at New Buffalo Phone 897 Financial Execs Guests Of Lawyers ROLUN B. MANSFIELD More state aid to alleviate children's mental health prob- therapeutic." lems In Michigan was urged Thursday night by_ two experts In the field of as one such bill died In a state senate committee. Dr. R. D. Rabinovitch, director of Hawthorne Center at North- ville, and Dr. C. M. Schrier. med leal director of Kalamazoo State hospital, spoke at a special pro- gram 'sponsored by the local chapter of the American assn. of University Women and the Michigan Probate Judges Assn. The session was held In Benton Harbor high school auditorium. Both speakers stressed an ur- gent need for public support to help sohe the state's mental health problem for children. At the close of the program, mem- bers of the AAUW distributed mimeographed letters to be sent {state legislators as a plea for the ammendments. The Community and the Dis- turbed Child' was the subject of Dr. itch's talk. Pro- viding state hospital funds is only a part of the mental health program, he said, because the community has the responsibil- ity of pimiding a private agen- cj for children who don't belong In state hospitals A good besinninj on the local level is to provide trained foster parents work- in; with an agency for dis- turbed children, Dr. llabino- lilch said. "Without aid on the local level state hospitals will on- ly have to fravt he said. Dr Robinovitch said each town needs "a kind ol child guidance clinic, emphasis on court pro- and detensfon service that Is Area bankers and savings and loan executives were guests of the Berrien County Bar Assn at a dinner meeting Thursday evening in Tosi's restaurant. Speaker for the occasion was Rollin B Mansfield, a vice pres- ident In the trust department of The First National Bank of Chi- cago. Mansfield, a lawyer and the author of numerous articles on estate planning, gate a humor- ous lecture on the community oi Interest between attorneys and financial experts. W. J. Banyon, editor of The Herald-Press, served as master of ceremonies. He called the "bread and wa- ter" detention method "a pre- Vlctorlan" means of treating children, "which well have to pay for In the future." He emphasized the need for establishing rehabilitation sys- .ems In Michigan: "Three months In an overcrowded vo- cational school Is not the answer, but separation from the com- munity, training, and counseling, jrovided by a rehabilitation cen- Is." Dr. Scbrier's topic was "Hos- pitalizatlon for the mentally Re- tarded He labeled Mich- igan's mental health effort as a 'disgrace to the whole Dr. Schrier said his hospital is under staffed in eiery field Although more children have been committed to his hospital In the last few years, he said, and despite more difficulty in canng for children In compar- ison to adults, the hospital staff has been cut Some of the particularly weak spots in the Kalama- 100 hospital, M outlined by Dr. Schrier, were need for more teachers, more doctors, and more psychologists. He said only three teachers cart for 56 disturbed children when one teacher should be allotted for every three or four. Only 15 doctors and one psychologist serve abont 3400 patients. Excluding the psychopaths, with the proper facilities 60 to 80 percent of the children con- fined to the state hospital can be cured." Dr. Schrier said. Berrien County Probate Judge Julian Hughes said, "We 1m e room to confine criminals in our In our state hospitals for men- tally disturbed children who may be helped. "Only 85 children are allowed in the state hospital at Kala mazoo. At this moment a chil ou hit it hum the platter. Chicken Nook Open 11 A. M. till P M Closed Mondays Phone VU 3-3145 1111 Main St, St Joseph i   

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