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Benton Harbor News Palladium Newspaper Archive: November 30, 1974 - Page 10

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Publication: Benton Harbor News Palladium

Location: Benton Harbor, Michigan

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   Benton Harbor News Palladium (Newspaper) - November 30, 1974, Benton Harbor, Michigan                               PAGE TEN THE NEWS-PALLADIUM, BENTON HARBOR, MICH.1, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER SNOW KEADY FOR PRESIDENT: Skiing conditions at Vail, Colo., are reported at 12-inch, packed powder. Present plans call for President Gerald Ford and his family to spend a skiing vacation at Vail over the Christmas and New Year's holidays. .Monarch has 42-inch depth and Wolf Creek along with Berthoud Pass have 36-inch depths. (AP Wirephoto) Their Fingers Crossed For Jupiter Rendezvous MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) Scientists are banking on the "luck of Pioneer 11" to survive a hazardous rendezvous with Jupiter and give them an armchair view of the giant planet's weather, system. Dr. Tom Gehrels, chief of the Pioneer team operating its pic- ture-taking instrument, said Pioneer 10 luck a year ago gave scientists their clearest view of the solid light weather zone in the planet's southern tropical region. "It would be the luck of Pioneer 11 if we could see this zone break said Gehrels at a news briefing Friday when the spacecraft, traveling at miles per hour, moved to within 2.5 million miles of Jupiter. Pioneer 11 is expected to make its closest approach Mon- day night. At that point, it will be bombarded by intense radia- tion. Earlier, Dr. L. V. Baker said in an interview he already had detected a dark spot in the south tropical zone which indicated the solid light weather zone could already be breaking up. Ford Will Miss 1-196 Dedication LANSING, 'Mich. (AP) President Ford will not attend the dedication next month of the western Michigan freeway that bears his name, a state highway department spokesman said Friday. Ford has informed state of- ficials that he won't be able to show up when the Gerald R. Ford Freeway otherwise known as Interstate 196 is of- ficially opened to traffic Dec. 11, the spokesman said. The highway runs 80 miles from Benlon Harbor to Grand Rapids, Ford's hometown. The highway cuts through some of the territory Ford represented for 25 years as a congressman. Some 56 miles of the freeway already are in use. The ceremonies will mark the open- ing of a 24-mile portion from Holland to Grand Rapids. It is not known if any White House representatives will be on hand, the department spokes- man said. The legislature passed a resolution naming the freeway after Grand Rapids' most prominent son, the 38th U.S. Air Force To Buy Fighters WASHINGTON (AP) The Air Force has awarded General Dynamics Corp. a increase in a contract for Fill fighter planes, even though President Ford is seeking to cancel congressional authoriza- tion for 12 more planes. An Air Force spokesman said Friday that the additional money is intended to keep the Fill production line open in case it is decided later to buy the planes. Ford earlier this week asked Congress to cancel the authorization as part of a series of budget cutbacks. President. Meanwhile, all but a little cleanup work is completed on Michigan's other Ford Freeway named after Edsel Ford (no relative) and located in Detroit, the state highway department said. The Edsel Ford Freeway and the John Lodge Freeway, also in Detroit, have undergone exten- sive repair at a cost of about million, the department spokes- man said. The Edsel Ford and Lodge Freeways are the two most heavily traveled highways in the state. He said a picture showed the spot to be on the opposite side of the planet from where the famous giant red spot, a cen- turies-old hurricane, is located. "My guess is that'the dark spot indicates the zone may be breaking said Baker. An analysis of the pictures will give scientists detailed knowledge of how the weather patterns on Jupiter operate, and may help them better unders- tand the earth's weather sys- tem, say scientists here at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames Research Center, which operates the Pioneer programs. If the spacecraft survives the radiation bombardment, it will give scientists their best view yet of the mysterious north and south poles of the planet, Gehrels said. "These are very strange, deep gaseous regions that we've known about for a long time, but Pioneer 11 will give us a look at he said. Scientists expressed op- timism that the spacecraft would survive the intense radiation and send back the in- formation. Pioneer 11 will come to within miles of Jupiter's cloud tops. Scientists hope to compensate for the greater radiation by sending Pioneer 11 through the most dangerous area at miles per hour faster than any spacecraft has ever traveled so that it will be exposed to the most intense radiation for only two to five minutes. THE FOLLOWING DOWNTOWN BENTON HARBOR STORES WILL BE OPEN SUNDAY, DEC. 1st to JC PENNEY ZALES JEWELERS CUNNINGHAMS FIRESTONE BOOTERY ARISTA THRIFT SHOP EAST END FURNITURE SUNDAY SALE Texas Oilman Was 85 Frugal Billionaire H.L. Hunt DALLAS (AP) H.L. Hunt, who parlayed a inheri- tance into one of the world's greatest fortunes, once said thai anyone who knew how rich he was wasn't very rich. Hunt, an oilman with conser- vative political views and deep- seated opinions on how money should be used, died Friday at age 85 after a lengthy stay at Baylor Hospital here. He was admitted with a virus last Sep- tember. The family declined to Kive the cause of his death. Funeral services will be held Monday at the First Baptist Church in Dallas with burial at Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park. Hunt, whose fortune has been estimated at billion, gave this formula for making money: on have to be lucky. You have to be of an acquisitive nature, aggressive and thrifty." He once was known as a big- time gambler, particularly on sports events. But he stopped gambling and smoking in his later years and he claimed he could have been five times richer had he never gambled. Stories of his frugality are legion. He carried his lunch in a brown paper bag, walked blocks to and from his office to save 50 cents on parking fees and toured his home turning out unneces- sary lights. Conservatives viewed him as a great spokesman; liberals considered him a symbol of the far right and of big business. But Hunt preferred to be known as a "constructive." He said he aimed his money at better government and once told a national television audience that the last really good president was Calvin Coolidge. Hunt, who was born Feb. 17, 1889. was the youngest of eight children of a Confederate war Veteran. He quit school at the fifth grade to roam the country working as a farm hand, lum- berjack and cowboy. Five years later he inherited That inheritance became the basis for what billionaire oil-' man J. Paul Getty called the largest independent oil fortune in the nation. Hunt bought a plantation in Arkansas mostly for taxes and debts. But when Arkansas drillers struck oil, he headed for the fields. By 1920 Hunt had his first million, but the big riches came at the East Texas oil field, greatest ever found to that time. Hunt slogged through the muddy East Texas oil fields in a Modei-T Ford buying and selling oil leases and watching over his drilling rigs before moving to Dallas. There he bought an outsized replica of George Washington's Potomac home overlooking a lake in the city. He named his home Mount Vernon. He later diversified into such businesses as pecans, asphalt, canned chickens, roses, and cosmetics virtually guaranteed to keep users looking young. "I've never tried to become the biggest oilman or anything he once said. "For all practical purposes a man with is as well off as a man with million. A millionaire who throws his money around is stupid." Another time, he said, "There are times when I've wished I'd wake up stone broke. It would be a great adventure to see how good I was, to see if I could create lots of wealth again." One legendary story has cir- culated in Dallas for years about when his son, Lamar Hunt, owned the Dallas Texans later the Kansas City Chiefs and the football team was Rising money. The story goes that a friend said to Lamar's father: "I hear Lamar is losing a million dollars a year on the football team. For God's sake, how long can that last." "About 60 the elder Hunt replied. There are signs that a titanic struggle may ensue over Hunt's empire. Earlier court cases in- volving various wiretap charges brought up that possibility. Paul M. Rothermel, former top Hunt security boss, said two years ago in an Interview that there is a struggle between the Hunt children by his first wife and the children by his second. Hunt remarried after the death of his first wife. DIES: H. L. Hunt, one of the world's richest men, died Friday in Dallas, Texas. Hunt, 85, had been hospitalized since last September. (AP Wirepho- to) I INTRODUCING) SECRETARIES NIGHT MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 BOSSES NIGHT TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3 DOOR PRIZE! BOSSES NIGHT: PANASONIC 660 CALCULATOR SECRETARIES NIGHT: MR. COFFEE I FREE FREE GIFT WRAPPING! OPEN UNTIL exactra 21 calculator Texas Instruments Adds, subtracts, multiplies and divides instantly. Bright 8-digit display shows negative sign, decimal point, all numerals and calculation overflow indication. Battery operation operates from 3 easy-to-repiace pen- light batteries (not Light weight and completely portable for use anywhere. 29 95 Many other games to choose from Chinese Checker Game Heavy duty, stackable, interlock- ing and colorful plastic cases. Case size: 90 Day Mlg. Warranly Business Gift CROSS Writing Instruments in 12 Karat Gold Filled Chrome H 1 2 12K Gold Filled MEMOMATIC by Park Sherman Travel Clapper Wood Clappers o Chess Set Miniature plastic peg chess. Walnut peg board in durable simulated leather box hinged cover. OO Texas Instruments electronic digital clock snooze TI-71 Automatic rol memo pad. One hand operation! Walnut grain top. 00 VISIT OUR RETAIL OFFICE SUPPLY 8, FURNITURE STORE Model Tl -70 Without snooze alarm DOUBIEDAY BROS. CO 215 COLFAX BENTON HARBOR PHONE 926-8293 Across from The News-Palladium I p.m. to 5 p.m. cash 'n carry NI1SON FURNITURE 401 RED ARROW HWY. BRIOGMAN PH. 465-6626 OPEN MON. thru FRI. 9 to 8 SAT V to 5 SUNDAY 1 to 5   

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