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Benton Harbor News Palladium Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Benton Harbor News Palladium

Location: Benton Harbor, Michigan

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   News-Palladium, The (Newspaper) - December 14, 1962, Benton Harbor, Michigan                               Michigan's Biggest Buy For Reader And For Advertiser FINAL EDITION BENTON HARBOR, MICH. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1962 32 PAGES PRICE 7 CENTS WEATHER Light snow toiilglit, Saturday; low tonight 5 to 15. TEMPERATURES Reading! from noon to Frl. noon: 12 n................ 7 3 m..............it 6 p. ni............. II 9 p. m.'............20 12 6 a: m...... 9 a. ni. 12 n......... 28, at noon Frl.; low, 7 at noon Thuri. Shovel Into Till Santa Sure Weather To Turn Better Good Fellows started shovelin out today, knowing there's a Ion way to go but confident that San ta's JuiicT would snow bail to successful finish. The Good Fellow total took healthy jump despite som of the worst weather In years And Santa noted optimisticall "The ;weather has been so bad, can phly improve now." The blast or cold and sno' caused the Good Fellow new. paper sale to be postponed week until Friday, Dec. 21. Ex change newsies vowed to be with more vigor than ever to pus the fund over the top. "EVEN IN ZERO" Santa was "delighted with th latest receipts: "It shows heart are warm even in zero weather, he said. He noted the presence of som long-time contributors. There wa from Harold Viet Auto Parts continuing the tradition of hi late father, Charles, who-was a annual Good Fellow subscriber Sears, Roebuck and'Co., wh6s local manager, Harold Geary, i one of our biggest civic boosters contributed Season greetings came from th Fruit Belt Navy Mothers' No. 164 along with Also putting each in the Good Fellow till were Peter Pan Child Study Club and Daughters of Penelope, Andro- mache Chapter No. 14. DON'T FORGET "Clubs. haven't been able to meet in this weather, but they haven't forgotten to join the rank of Good Santa praised The fund now has risen to 725.52. Here's the complete ronor rol as of'today: Klwanls Club of Benton Harbor 50.00 "From Me To JTou for Walter Gilllce 8.00 Benton Twep, Fire Dept. No. 2............... 5.00 Harold L. and May B. Scherer in memory of Harold L. Scherer II 10.00 Town Country Dance Club................'. 3.00 Christy Slough, Jr.........18.00 Sanitary Cleaners 10.00 Deer Forest Wishing Well 125.00 "In Loving Memory ol Paul C. 5.00 "Eighteen 18.00 Pleasant Beauty Salon 5.01 Salon 5.00 Michigan Hotel 10.00 Roberta Scher Resnick A David Scher, "In Mem- ory of our brother Lewis Allan Scher on his birth- day, Nov. 9th" 5.00 Producers Creamery Driv- ers' Association 15.00 Washmobile Car Wash 20.00 Arnold G. Luther 5.00 John Glassman, "Your' Friendly Auctioneer" 10.00 B'nai B'rlth, Benton Har- bor Lodge No. 1272 10.00 Williams 20.00 Benton Township Fireman Fund, Post 1 15.00 News-Palladium ........150.W Farmers and Merchants National Bank 100.00 Patti Bull Stetler 10.00 Harrison E. Boll 10.00 John G. Bull............. 10.M Bill B. Bull..............-. 10.00 Jim B. Ban 10.00 RenryGrieie 5.00 McDonald CUnte 15.00 Thayer Paper Co. Employes of Hambnrgen J.M.tO Fraternal Order of Eajlei, Ladlei AuilHary, Lake View AuJlHary, No. 425, St. Joseph, Mkb. 5.H From All the Employe! at Benton Harbor Holly'i 15.00 Berrien County Package Company .....2M.M Duke at Serutan" (ret.) 2.M A Friend..................1W.H (See page 11, 2, col. 4) NO BLIZZARD SO AREA CAN DIG ODT NOW SNOWSHOERS TO THE RESCUE: SEeriff's Deputy Richard Worra (left) and Van Buren Health Administrator John Fleming used snowshoes to take aid to a marooned heart patient north of Glendale yesterday. They trekked half-mile through fourfoot snow carrying food and medicine to Ellsworth Allen, a heart patient who was down to his last two pills. State police, sheriff's officers and county officials ran half-dozen mercy errands on snowshoes in snow-buried Van Buren county yesterday. Note depth of snow by signpost. (News-Palladi- um photo) A. EDWARD BROWN Canner Gets High Food Industry Post William Hewlett, president of Consolidated Foods orporation, today announced the election of A. Edward president of Benton Harbor's Miehifan Fruit "tenners, as a group vice-president in the parent corn- any. In addition to managing Mich- an Fruit Canners and Colum- la Foods, Brown, a St. Joseph esident, will exercise over, all upervision of Consolidated's oastal Foods division at Cam- ridge, Md., and the United tales Products corporation, at an Jose, Calif. The action places him in large of all the canning opera- ons in the Consolidated corn- any. In a similar action, Roland ognazzini became the other iroup vice president in the Con- Jlidated line-up. In addition to ontlnuing direct management the Union Sugar division, he ill supervise the Shasta Bev- ages and the Gentry divisions. 11 three units are in California. OLICT UNCHANGED Hewlett said the action does ot change Consolidated's basic olicy of having Individual exec- Ives manage separate divisions, jut in preparation for addition- growth by Consolidated Foods, has been deemed advisable to legate some of the responslbll- es of the president's office." Brown, 55, left his law practice St. Joseph In 1947 to assume e management of Michigan Tult canners. He took over the alignment created by the death Wflliam A. Godfrey, of Bin- on Harbor, a co-founder rm. On March 30 of this year, Ichtgan Fruit Canners merged to Consolidated juodi. Th. A. EDWARD BROWN transaction, based on Consoli- dated's stock price at the time, was a million dollar trade. Brown became a director In the parent concern and shortly after received the additional re- sponsibility of supervising the Columbia Foods division. v Snow, shovels good supply.. Em- pire Hardware, 280 Empire, Adv. Snow Shovels, John Plcdt Sons, 2400 M-139 Nlckerson. Adv. Anderson Building Materials will be closed Sat., Dec. IS due to the dealhofMr.Andenoo. Adv. Cigarettes, Finger Tip, Family Fun They All Had Part In Snow Crisis PAW Wide range of human reactions to being snow- bound for a week was reflected in a sampling ,of the hundreds of calls that besieged; the Van Buren County Highway depart- ment office in the last several days. One man pleaded to be freed from his home. He had run out of cigarettes, and the involuntary withdrawal pangs were real dis- tress to him. A much more stoic response to the enforced isolation came from a Paw Paw family. It fi- nally asked to be aided In getting a daughter to a doctor, The girl had :cut the tip of a finger off Monday and had been without a doctor's attention for three days. The parents had, treated the wound as best they could, and asked for help only when it appeared the need for profes- sional attention was imperative. DIFFERENT VIEW And contrary to the tone of most of the urgent pleas that came in over the road depart- ment phones, was the voice of one area: mother. She was thankful -for every snowflake that fell, she said. Both parents have full time jobs and their'family life is a constant rush of coming and going to work and to school. But being snow- bound, the family, which Includes two children, has become "reac- qualnWd." With a good supply of uel and food on hand, they spent snowbound days playing games, singing, reading and do- ng a variety of other things all together a family, related. Eight-Day Snowfall Siege Ends Light Flurries Still Expected Over Weekend BY JERRY KRIEGER N-P Farm Editor A predicted blizzard that might have capped snowbound south- western Michigan into almos complete immobility failed to de velop last night and gave the area a chance today to dig ou 'from an unprecedented eigh days of snow. Just as Lt. Gov. T. John Le> sinski ordered extra state polici troopers and National Guards- men sent into the area Thurs- day afternoon, the devastating storm subsided. The Weather Bureau forecast only occasional light snow flur- ries in sight through Sunday. An .official at the Grand Rap- ids Weather Bureau said a sec- ondary cold front that movec down from Canada last night turned "but to be much weakei than had been anticipated. II failed to generate heavy new snow conditions in moving over Lake Michigan and the winds did not blow. PUPILS SENT HOME The blizzard warning, however, had caused most schools in Ber- rien county to close for today. Those school systems that were open yesterday sent their classes home earlier than usual as the prolonged storm promised to grow even worse. Three area counties, Van Bu- Cass and Allegan, asked the governor's office to declare a state of emergency here, to the end that outside help could be sent_ in. Many hundreds of fam- Hes had been marooned in their homes, some as long as eight days. Food, fuel and medical sup- plies were being exhausted in a number of these homes. THURSDAY'S SNOW Six inches ,or new snow fell over most of Berrien county during the day Thursday, and it tapered off nland to about three inches at Paw Paw. This brought the total fall in eight days to 44 inches at Benton Harbor as measured at the twin cities airport, and to 55 inches as neasured at Paw Paw by the vil- age public works superintendent. National Guardsmen were alert- ed in units at Sturgis, Niles, Do- wagiac, St. Joseph, Three Rivers, iouth Haven, Holland, Grand lapids, Muskegon and Manistee, in the face of the impending bliz- zard. Four carloads of state police roopers were sent in to the Fifth district headquarters for emer- gency standby. ROADS CLEARING Spared from the new blow, county road officials in-all. four See back page, sec.-1, col. 7) FIRST MILK IN THREE DAYS: Patricia (left) and Susanna Sawicki happily guzzle their first taste of milk since Monday when their rural'home-was'iso- lated by snow. Milk was lugged in by News-Palladium icporter in search of pictures. (News-Palladium photo) Isolated Family C 9J. TT Keeps spirits LJp Wife Still ThinksOf Neatness No Bread, Milk For Five Days EDITOR'S NOTEl James Trelnar, News.Palladiutn Paw Paw bureau re- porter, parked his car on a main high- way, then waded walif.deep in snow to .........rvlew. A native of nlnsula and a ski ry later he hodn't ift. "If It er he cet the following- fat Michigan's llppei tan, Treloar was so aken his skis nut bad been one hotis puffed, "I'd By JAMES TRELOAR N-P's Paw Paw Bureau PAW PAW Stirring an 1m- rovised concoction of boiled entils and cabbage, Mrs. Rich- rd Sawicki indulged in grim umor: "We learned during the war ow to stretch things." Sawicki and his wife, who work Paw farm, are Polish 1m- jgraiits whose parents spent World War II in a German orced labor camp. By nightfall yesterday, the Sa- wicki's and their three children ad been without milk or bread ince Monday and their food applies had dwindled down to wo grapefruit, a little flour and owdered milk and not much se. They were one of over 100 fami- es shut in by the 55 inches of now that has smothered Van uren county the past seven ays. But when this News-Palladium eporter managed to creep the fiile and a'half, into their snow- 'ocked home, Mrs. Sawicki could WANT groceries, Mrs. Richard Sawicki mixes last batch of pancake batter concocted from flour, water, powdered egg and applesauce. The family has lived on this for the past three days. (News-Palladium photo) only give the hallowed American iousewife's cry: "But my house such a OTHERS MORE TROUBLED The Sawicki's, for all their are faring better than many other Van Buren families (See back page, sec. 1, col. S) Blizzard Fizzles, And Plants Humming Again The week-long snowstorm that Twin Cities residents have battled Imost without letup suddenly nd unexpectedly called it quits ast night. The storm died, however, In a union befitting the best of the Id-time winter selges when it dumped: toother six Inches of MOW to the more than three feet (ready standing, and prompted he weather bureau to predict pos- Ible blizzard by. mid-1 night. CLOSE EARLY The severe weather 'forecast made at noon caused the closing in early afternoon of some offices and businesses as office workers and clerks started for outlying homes. The forecast also was responsible for early factory shut- downs and the canceling of shifts scheduled to work last night and today. Continental Can Co. 60 of home today following cancellation of today's shift due to the forecast. The Ben- dlx Lakeshore division canceled the Thursday afternoon and mid- night shift after sending day shift workers home early. Bendlx (See back pane, 1, col, I) Rum'ge, Sat., 1023 Plpestone. Adv. Double Sweep Stake'every Sat., 4 p. m. Twin City Rcc. Adv. INDEX TO Inside Pages SECTION ONE Editorials Page 2 St. Joseph News.........Page 3 Women's Section Pages 4, 5, 6 Ann Landers Page 8 Obituaries Page 18 SECTION TWO Area Highlights Page 1 Sports Page) 2, 3 Farm News............. 9 Comics, TV, Radio .----Pagf U Markets............... Page II Classified Ada 12 to 15 W. Bird Seed Sunflower, cwt. Shady Acres. Adv. Free of extra chg., doll with ea. purchase. Unger's, 106 W. Main. Eyeglass service, Musser Opti- cians, 171 E. Main, 2nd fir. Adv. Lunches, 69c up. Candyland. Adv. Candles, 39c up. Candyland. Adv. Hat Sale at St. Joseph, X   

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