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Benton Harbor News Palladium Newspaper Archive: January 17, 1958 - Page 10

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Publication: Benton Harbor News Palladium

Location: Benton Harbor, Michigan

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   Benton Harbor News Palladium (Newspaper) - January 17, 1958, Benton Harbor, Michigan                              PAGE TEN THE NEWS-PALLADIUM, BENTON HARBOR, MICH. FRIDAY, JANUARY. 17, 1968y8 Corrections Chief Talks In Buchanan Brooks Praises Parole System BUCHANAN, Jan. 17 Stressing OBITUARIES thst 85 per cent of the Inmates lodged In Michigan corrective in- stitutions are freed to return to civilian life, Earnest Brooks, chair- man of the Michigan Department of Corrections, described the functions aMd relatives attending tho services isnd operation of slate prisons to the were Mr. and Mrs. Linden Frakes, Berrien County Democratic cluu Larry and Llnrty Prankcs, of Bark Wednesday evening at the 111.; Mrs. Harry Tutton of Frakeg Rites Held Funeral services for Mrs. Leah Frakes, 61, of route 3, Coloma, wen held Thursday afternoon In the Florin funeral home. The Rev. Stanley Buck of Hi Methodist Peace Temple conductec the services, with Mrs. W. W. Butch- er at the organ. Casket bearers were Morris Paul- ;en, Harold Frakes, Robert Frakes Ton a Id Frakes, George Frakes, and Wayne Fi-nkes. Burial was in Crystal Springs cemetery. Among the out of town friends Chicago; Mrs. Bess Pearce of Val- half of the paraiso, Hid.; Mr. and Mrs. EnrI persons convicted of minor offens-1 Frakes and Willlnm Prnkes of Cov- es, particularly first offenders and'ert; Joseph Coash and Howard an township hall. Brooks said that Coash of Chicago. Mrs. Frakcs Monday In the Wntervliot hospital. She hud been youths, are placed on probation. CLAIMS SAVINGS Michigan, he said, has had great! success in the field of probation and'111 December.___ parole, and has saved taxpayers "great sums" through tlie intelli- Manorial Dedicated gent use of thc.se practices. f Brooks said toe cost of keeping A memorial erected in memory of a prisoner in a stale prison is about j n "h peb a year as compared to about1'957' w bc Dedicated at the Clul- year when placed on proba- of Israel ce.neUry Sunday, a year lion or parole. Another new and successful proj- ect of the state corrections depart- ment has been the establishment of prison camps for prisoners who are considered ready for supervi- sion, rather than confinement be- hind walls, the chairman continued. "These camps, established with local consent, become a part of the maintainance of our stale parks and aid in the conservation of the natural resources of our Brooks said. "The only restraint on the prisoners In these camps is a moral one, and there nre no guns in the camp, and only one guard. "Here again, considerable savings are possible due to lower inlllal cost.1! ot the camps as compared lo prisons, as well as lower con- finement Brooks said. REPORTS HEARD Business coming before the club included a report by Roy Stanley on the legislative conference held in Lansing Jan. 11, a report by Tom Slattcry, Fourth district state central convmitleeman, on the Democratic stale central cominitce's meeting In Lansing, Jan. 15. Slattery reported that the central committee has established R com- munity service committee lo pro- vide a liason between the people and state officials who can help them. The community service committee svould not act on patronage prob- lems, but would act only as a con- tact to help fill requests for infor- mation. The Berrieu County Democratic club has scheduled a meeting for Feb. 19 when Miss Teresa Farrell. member of the Michigan social wel- ware commission, will speak. Time and place of the meeting is to be announced later. Bnrncl Alberts was an parly set- tler of Benton Harbor, coming here 52 years ago. He is survived by his wife, Lena; two sons, Harold Alberts and Alex Alberts; a daughter, Mrs. Marty (Pearl) Gran, and five grandchil- dren, all of Benton Harbor. Also surviving are two sisters, boih of New York, Nelson Rites Set Funeral services for Mrs. Odus Nelson, 38, Box, 208, Riverside, will be held Saturday, at 2 p. in. in the Benton Harbor. Tabernacle. The Her. Guy Wnlsh, pastor, will ofli- i Burial will be in Crystal Springs cemetery. Mrs. Nelson died early Thurctlay morning nt St. Joseph Memorial hospital after H six months illness. Friends may cnll nt the funeral home. Area Deaths South Haven BPW Elects Albert Labz SOUTH HAVEN, Jan. bert Labz, manager of the South Haven branch of the Michigan Fruit canners was elected president of the South Haven Board ot Pub- lice Works Thursday afternoon. Labz, former vice-president re- places O. M. Whitlow, who resigned as president several months ago. Elected as vice-president at the BPW meeting was Edwin Apple- yard, a plant superintendent of the S. E. Overton company at South Haven. Safe Cracking Attempt Fails An attempt to crack open the of the Thaycr Paper Co.', 627 Wes Main street, last night, was unsuc cessful, according to Benton Hnrbo police. The dial was knocked off, but th burglars failed to get the safe opct: Nothing else was disturbed in (li  one son nnd three daughters. Mr; Michels of Bloomingdale, Walte Sherman nud Mis. Kalhiyn Kcl.ste of Kalamiw.oo; Mrs, Frances Maxnn of Jacksonville, Fin.; 10 Rrandchil dren; and one groat granddaughter Burial will be at Riverside come tery, Knlamnzoo. Gray, Evans Due To Attend Whirlpool Dinner Eiisha Gray, II, president of the Whirlpool corporation, and Glenn Evans, genera] manager of Whirl- pool's St. Joseph division, are ex- pected to attend the Whirlpool Em- ployes' Federal Credit union's an- nual dinner meeting, starting at 7 PIT.. Saturday at the Shadowland Ballroo.n, according to credit union Erwln Hoehne. announced that the Three Sunr, veil known nightclub and ctara, have been signed to the banquet. There will b: three other acts performing. the show, Bert Rose hU orchestra will play until 1 Parly Held Near Glendom GLENDORA, Jnn. and friends from Barodn, Stevens vlllc. New Troy, Berrien Springs an South Bend surprised Mr. and Mr EmU Pranks, Gleiidora, at a house warming party. The couple recenl ly moved into ihdr new home wcs of Glendorn. They received man gifts for their home. A ham dlnnc was served. Democrats IVow Control MSU Board Have Four To Two Voting Majority EAST LANSING, Jan. 17 took control Thursday if the State Board of Agriculture, overnlng body of Michigan State University. They now have a 4-2 majority. Dr. Conner D. Smith, PJncoiiiilng eterlnarian, was elected chairman. ie succeeded Clark L. Biody of East Lansing, a Republican and xtard member since 1921. The last time tlie Democrats had majority was in 1938 and 1933, if any policy changes were ontemplated, Smith replied: "We wouldn't want It. We hone o continue to ntnke this a great ntverslty and have every conft- ence In the administration." New board members are Q. Don- Id Stevens of Grand Rapids and an C. Vanderploeg, who were elcc- ed lost April. They succeeded Tle- ubKcans Forest H. Akers of De- roit and Frederick H. Mueller of Grand Rapids. ANNAII KEY FIGURE Dr. John A. Hannah, MSU presi- ent and generally regarded as a cpnbllcnn, is the strong pollcy- iRker nt Michigan State. The board named Durvvard B. arner, vice president for off-ciun- us affairs, to take charge of de- elopment of MSU's new Oakland ranch college. ainer said bids probably will e taken the last week in February or the first building to be con- truc'ted on the Meadowbrook Farms stale donated by Mr. and Mrs. Ifred O. Wilson. The board accepted gifts and runts totalling for the imi- ersity. (ilso Approved Theodore Lcipprandt us assistant agricul- nral agent in Macomb County. fingerprints Changeable, Joctor Says CHICAGO, Jan. 17 (AP) contrary to the encral belief can be changed ermancntly, a New Orleans physl- an reported yesterday in a medi- al publication. Writing in the current Archives f Dermatology of the American ifedical association, Dr. Jnmes W. iurks described two medical 'cases 'here Ihigcrprlnb; were obliterated. "The potential inconsistency of ngcrprluls renders positive idenli- cation by this means uncertain nd thus lias tegnl implications will undoubtedly affect ccv- ain judicial decisions." Burks said Burks, of Tulane university schoo if medicine, noted that law enforce- nent agencies and other workers 11 the field of Identification long iave considered fingerprints unal- erable, In the cases described by Burks, volving wire brushes of a type sed to remove acne or smallpox cars were used In a technique ailed skin planing. :AR, BUS CRASH Goes After Bases Ticketed In ollision Berrien sheriff's officers Issued wo tickets yesterday aftcrnoor fter an auto and a Twin Cities Coach Lines, Inc., bus had minor collision nt Pontiac und Onondaga roads, in Fnlr Plain, The bus driver, Bobby Roberts, Route 3, Benton Harbor, was, harged with not having a chanf- eur's license In his possession. The inr driver, Barbara Ringer, 1415 jnngley avenue, St. Joseph, was :hnrged with falling to yield the Ight-of-iray. Young Driver Is Arrested PAW PAW. Jan, iouch, 17, of route 3, Paw Paw booked nt the Van Buren Jni em-ly this morning by Paw state police on a reckless drlvin; charge. Police said they arrested Coucl at about n.in. on M-119 i Porter township after chnsing htti and another motorist at high speed northeast, from Decfttur. They sal' they lost tlie other car when th two cnrs split up near the Decnlur- Porler township line. Couch was to be arraigned this morning before Justice Olenn B. Hucy of Paw Paw. BHIDE AND GKOOM: Edward G. Robinson, 64, and Jiis bride New York dress designer, Jane Adler, 38, are all smiles.in Robinson's dressing room at the National ThoaLez1 in Washington last night after it was disclosed they Avere married.earlier in the day at nearby Arling- ton, Va. The bride holds Camp, Robinson's miniature Doberman Pinscher. Robinson is playing the lead in the stage production of "Middle of the a play centering on the May-December marriage of a man to a much younger woman. (AP Wirephoto) Venezuelans Get Appeal Stmleiils Urged To Cease Riots CARACAS, Venezuela, Jan. 17 AIJ) Venezuela's new education nliiister has appealed to Caracas tudcnts [o end their dempnslra- ions against the regime of Fresi- lent Marcos Perez Jimenez. The speech by Dr. Fernandez Moran over a na- tionwide hookup last night wns Inkcn as an indication of tlie government's concern over the sluilcnt outbreaks. Tho demonstrations have con- inued for four days. Five were re- >orled yesterday. (Reports In New York said the lolice fired on 250 students dem- instrnling in a Caracas schoolyard Vednesday and wounded two. The govern m en t continued its tight cen- or.slilp, and coinniunicalions with he outside world were virtually lonexistcnt most of yesterday. They mproved last Fevnimdev. Mornn promised high school nnd university students in did not siiy how many vcrc be released when dcr is restored. TUB COUNTUY has been In nstiint slate of tension since the abortive Nen' Yem-'s Dny rebellion >y disgruntled nlr force units. The new education minister, hlm- ;elf an 'atomic sciential, asked Iriking students to go back to their Masses and announced government lor a. brotul scientific pro- rrnin. He said student teams would be mined iibrond Jfiid in techni- cal institutes nt home for the oil nrt chemical industries. He also R program to build atomic re- actors would be studied. Asks In Accident Suit REAL ROMANCE Thco. Cleurtencn of St. Joseph las nskcd for in damages :o compeiisnte him for injuries he received when he was struck by in nuto at Colfax and Empire avenue. in Benton Hnrbor on June 8, 1351 Clendcncii, represented by til Benton Hnrbor law firm of Ciore Williams, names Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hassle, Route 2, Decalur, as do fendants In a Berrien Circuit Cour it. Mrs. Hnssle was driving whei the plaintiff was injured, the su! said. Stage Star Robinson Is Wed Again WASHINGTON, Jan. 17 (AP) Veteran actor Edward G. Robinson WBB married yesterday lo New York dress designer Jane Adler in a usticc ot the Hence ceremony in learby Arlington, Va. Robinson, appearing in stage production here, disclosed (he a backstage Interview Inst night. He Rave his as 61, and his bride's as 38. The short, cigar-smoking aclor, vho frequently portrays the "tough is -starring in "Middle of the a play dealing with the narriagc of a man to a much 'ounger woman. The piny ran for i85 performances on Broadway be- fore going 611 the road. His bride is associated with the production. ASKED ABOUT FLAN'S for :ioneynioon, Robinson said; "The road Is a honeymoon." And his tall, brunette bride com- mented: "I don't know about Mr. Robin- son, but I'm very happy and ex- cited." Robinson's first marriage, to Gladys Cnsscll of New York City, ended in divorce in 1950 after 29 years. The first Mrs. Robinson was nn actress whose professional name was Gladys Lloyd. Suspected Of Hurli ing Object Benton township police this morn- ing picked np a n-year-olct youth Kenneth Alfred Manners, 238 Pine street, for investigation of mali- cious destruction of property. Police said Herman Brush, IIo- bnrt, Ind., complained Sundny after- noon he wns driving on US-12 in Benton township when a youth ii a car coming from the opposite di- rection hurled on object agains the windshield of the Brush car The windshield wns badly shattered no one wns hurt. Hauncrs admitted he was in the other car, officers said, but main- tained another person In the ant had hurled an ear of corn at the Brush nuto. Held For .Missile Sites WASHINGTON, Jan. Michigan's Upper Peninsula has aunched a campaign here for In- creased defense spending to pep up he area's economy, It was disclosed oday. Upper Michigan has in- :ercontlnental ballistic mine i ICBM' launching sites, atomic in- stallations'and generally Increased defense spending. A representative of the Upper Peninsula Development Bureau this week visited the -Atomic Energy Commission Civil Defense Administration and Defense Depart- ment offices In quest of a variety of projects. Gerald L. Johnson, who heads the mrean's Industrial department, was here Monday to push the Upper ?cninsula's fight for natural gas. LOCATION "IDEAL" But he told reporters today he itayed through the week in an at- empt to convince federal officials hat the peninsula's' geographic re- moteness makes it'ideal for defense establishments. 'There -was a good reception to our Johnson said. He declined to give further details of ,he officials' reaction. Johnson asked for; 1. One or more TCBM launching sites. 2. Underground atomic storage jrojects and atomic 3. Underground storage projects of medical supplies by civil defense authorities. t 4. More air in: addition to .lie existing Kinross Base nenr Sault Ste. Marie and K.'I. Sawyer Base near Marquette. "We're trying to' make the things work for us that have alwas's been problems for said Johnson. Traditionally, Upper Michigan's industrial development has been lamstrung by its extreme norther- ly' position and the lakes that sur- round it. CITES SEAWAY But Johnson said the government wants remote areas for defense projects. The lakes will become re- vived roads of commerce with the opening of the SI. Lawrence Sea- way next year, he added. He said abandoned iron ore and copper mines, and some active ones, could be utilized as underground storage areas. In arguing for atomic installa- tions, Johnson pointed to the prox- imity of Canadian uranium veins and the availability of large tracts of federally and state owned forest land. He said the location of Michigan Tech In the Upper Peninsula pro- vides a ready source of scientists to help with atomic projects. Johnson was to pay another vis- It to Defense -Department--offices today before returning to Michigan. Driver Is Fined THIRTY-DAY FORECAST: These maps, based on those issued. Jan. United States Weather Bureau, show the precipitation and temperature out- look for the country for the next 30 days. (AP Wire- photo maps) PAW PAW, Jim. A. Menchum, 42, of Route 2, Hartford, was fined and costs Thurs- day by Justice Glenn B. Huey of Paw Paw for reckless driving. A drunk driving charge against Meachum was dismissed alter conference' between Meyer Wnr- shawsky of 'South Haven, assistant county prosecutor, and Attorney John Verdonk of Banger, repre- senting Meachuni. Stnle police arrested Meachum Dec. 21 and lie was released on bond after pleading Innocent to the drunk driving charge before Huey Dec. 23. Fred Stanflll, 16, of route 2, Paw Paw, was bound over to Van Buren circuit court on a charge of larce'ny from a dwelling after ex- amination, before Justice Glenn Lowman of Lawton Thursday. StanfUl Is accused of taking from the Frederick .Oaborne home in Lawton Jan. 5. He was arrested by Iiawton police. Stnnflll was re- turned to the Van Buren jail under bond. Changes Are Opposed By Townships Constitutional Convention Hit LANSING, Jan. 17 Michigan Townships association has gone on record as opposed to the ceiling of a state convention to re- vise the state constitution. Winding up its annual convention here Thursday, the group said any changes in the constitution should come about through gradual amend- ment as m the past. This way, the resolution declared, individual amendments could re- eive more careful study and con- deration than if many amehd- lents were submitted under a gen- rnl revision, The group also voted to plan for conference with, the governor, imilar to the recent mayor's con- ercnce, to discuss township prob- ems. JEFEND JUSTICES'- Other resolutions 'called "for' a'bbl- shmenl of the Michigan Turnpike Vuthorlty and opposed any .move o abolish the office of justice of the peace. Another resolution opposed any hange in the law permitting a armer to shoot an unaccompanied Victor Eckardt of Lake Odessa was lamed association president. Eiect- :d vice presidents were Francis Drake of Crystal Falls, Milford Mellon of Ashland and Clark Mos >f Mendon Township. Drunk Driver Fined In St. Joe Mrs. Virginia Elem, of Battle Jreek, who was originally arrestec by St. Joseph police last Nov. 11 01 a charge of driving while drunk, re- appeared in St. Joseph municipa court Thursday. Mrs. Elem pleaded guilty to drlv- ng while drunk, and was fined J50 plus costs by Judge Joseph R jollier, Jr. SAVE Apollo Egg Coal FUNERAL HOME WAInut 6-6147 420 Pipettonc Benton Harbor [Prompt, Service] '14 Only 65 Tan Webb Fuel Co. 301 N. Short WAf-dH We Give Green Phone Wl 6-6159 OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS BRANDS OF MEN'S APPAREL AT REDUCTIONS OF 20% 50% IFOR MEN AND BOYS 132 WATER ST. ONE BLOCK FROM 4 CORNERS BENTON HARBOR OPEN FRIDAY NIBHT'TIL I P.M.... PARKINfl MACE IN Crash Injures Local Woman Mrs. Betty Sue Townley, 27, 248 Bellview street, Harbor, released from Mercy hospital after she treated tor minor injuries she received in a two-car collision ate yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Townley'e car collided with an auto driven by Arnold Francis, 44, Route 1, Sodus. She was pulling onto- Naomi road from a. grocery store driveway when the mishap oc- curred, Berrien Sheriff's Deputy. Fred Baker said. Mrs. Tonley was issued a sum- mons charging failure to yield igh6-of-way. Kiiigfish In Trouble, Out LOS ANGELES, Jan. 17 (AP) The king fish Amos 'n' Andy television show has been ordered held for trial on his wife's com- plaint of assault with a deadly weapon. But Just as "Kingflsh" Harry ,B. Tiin squeaks ovit of one; scrape after another on the, program, it looks' as if he'll avoid this real-life one too. His wife Viv- iari hjis libld the court slie doesn't" want to prosecute. The sat together, arm In arm and smiling, at his Municipal Court perliminnry hearing Thurs- day. Mrs. Moore had told police that during an argument in their home over a missing roast beef Jan. 7 he fired a pistol shot that landed in a china closet and hurt nobody. PRIVATE PARKING AT YOUR CONVENIENCE FLQRI TRU LY A WURLlIZER' Educational. Wurlitzer Piano provide exciting houri of musical enjoyment for you and your family. Exclusive Wurlitzer design and ultramodern Wurlitier production facilities give you. utniort you hav< purchased the finest when tt'j Piano-America's No. 1 Choice for musical excellence, rich beauty outstanding value. Stop il our stott and JM wide variety ot it) Its and ALSO AVAILABLE ON STUDENT RENTAL PLAN 208 E. Main W A 5-8821   

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