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Benton Harbor News Palladium Newspaper Archive: December 05, 1955 - Page 2

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Publication: Benton Harbor News Palladium

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   Benton Harbor News Palladium (Newspaper) - December 5, 1955, Benton Harbor, Michigan                               PAGE TWO (The (A daily newspaper published regularly except Sundays and holidays at Michigan, Oak and Colfax, Benton Harbor, Michigan, and represciitinz consolidation of the Daily Palladium and the Evening News THE NEWS-PALLADIUM, BENTON HARBOR, MICH. EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, STANLEY R. BANYON Entered as second class matter February 29, 1904, at the postofflce at Benton Harbor, Michigan, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1819. VOLUME 70, NUMBER 28S Member o( The Associated Press, NEA Circulations. Service and Audit Bureau of Telephone: WA 6-002? The Associated Press Is entitled exclusively to the use for publication of the looftl news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dis- patches. Subscription Rates: By mail: Allegan, Berrien, Cass, Van Buren counties, one year six months three months Elsewhere one year six months SB.50; three months one month These rates for delivery by mail only apply to E. F. D. routes and towns where delivery by News-Palladium carrier Is not available. Were K left for me to decide whether we should have government with- out ncwsjiapers or newspapers without government, I should not hesitate prefer the Jefferson. EXPRESSWAY HOI'KS SOAK Prospects of early construction of a Detroit-Chicago toll m turnpike via the twin cities area are much brighter now thai1 These Days By George E. Sokolsky (Copyright, 1055, King Features Syndicate, Inc.) CONSTITUENTS OF CULTUUE W. C. Whitnall of Ml. Vernon Washington, concludes a letter U me with this paragraph: "The three most prominent con stituents of culture In the U.S.A which arc increasing faster than the population, are, namely, crime religion and th population." What a sac commentary upoi Mr. W h i understanding o American culture He omits, for in- stance, the reallj remarkable work of scientific re- search which i undoubtedly th most brilliant achievement American culture in this century he omits the Sokolsky astonishing re- surgence of inter- est in music in this land, the num- erous American composers who arc producing music that is universally playtd. the great number of Amer- ican artists who are performing in every country; he omits advance- mmte architecture and indus- ut-n "enuiy to all the tools that for centuries were drab and oven ugly, and among these one nnturnliy turns to the esthetic Improvement of the kitchen. I could go on in many directions. I do not know what Mr. Whit- nail means when he says that re- ligion is increasing faster than the population. It is impossible to grasp why he puUs crime and religion in __ f------ Hi t_n me lilLll1] I1LJW Llltl L the Michigan Supreme Court in a formal decision has upheld the Michigan Turnpike Authority and the turnpike law which authorizes construction of toll roads in Michigan. Suit challenging the constitutionality of the act was brought by the city of Dearborn, which contended primarily that the turnpike law violated municipalities' control over their streets and alleys. The court said it interpreted the law to mean thc authority wny ne puts must obtain consent of municipalities to change their category, except that and alleys in existence and on that basis the toll mt' tllink of those humans law was constitutional. P'1 '-heir finite strength against Validation of the turnpike act means that in bonds for the 113-mile Saginaw-Rockwood toll road will be sold within GO days, but it removes obstacles holding up other toll roads within Michigan. A Detroit-Chicago expressway is one of the bigger proj- ects on the drawing boards and George N. Higgins, Turnpike Authority chairman, has announced that as soon as bonds are sold "we'll start on the Detroit-Chicago pay-as-you-go... Dovner mem o, road authorized in the act." He said he will ask Slate High- way 01' 'he other, way Commissioner Charles M. Xiegler, a member of the1 Bllt wlly> bl'othcr Whitnall, ai Tin-pike Authority but a foe of the turnpike, "to join us now incrca, and come out for better highways for Michigan." Ziegler favors freeways. Work is going on clay and night on the extension Surely, we are a religious people. That i.s why there are so many sects among us. That is why even the and agnostics in this coun- try are so active they nre God- coascious even though they do not believe in God. In Europe, similar persons are silent on the subject- it really does not bother them one a hardened criminal. are o A dog is just who man and gives aiiv.-rtuj WUSlWaK through Ohio. Presumably the Michigan turnpike will con- nect with the Indiana throughway south of Galien or where the east-west highway enters the Chicago area in the vicinity of Gary, Ind. TV, TT THE LAMPREYS J he United Stales is invaded by an enemy that is ever LILUl IK gaming ground. This is the sea lamprey, an eel-like creature that kills lake trout and other commercial fish. It has prac- tieally destroyed the industry of Lakes Michi- gan and Huron, and now is invading Lake Erie A conference of fishing experts from the United States and Canada will discuss the problem on Dec. 12 at Purdue University in Indiana. One of the first things for them to determine is why the lampreys are appearing in Lake Krie whose water had hitherto been thought too warm for them' I hey may have come up the St. Lawrence through the laiui Canal, by attaching themselves to the bottoms of ships One plan to kill them is to stretch electrical barriers across the mouths of streams up which these lake creatures go to spawn I- ood fish being more sensitive than lampreys, avoid C lampreys swim into them and are ;n i.-ii i r developing some form of will kill eels and not fish. Till this is done, lampreys will continue to be a serious menace to a great industry DO THEY BELIEVE ITt in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; ?.nd with- out him was not anything made that was made. In him was life- and the life was the light of men'. And the light shineth in "No one in Russia enjoys immun- ity from criticisim by the press." This whopper was told by Boris Kampov-Polevoy, head of a visit- ing Russian delegation, in un inter- view. Some one must have asked him if Russian newspapers ever prised at those neckties clio. criticize Stalin. He from Snnta. Aftei there simply do not seem to have been any occasion for criticism." Anyone who believes that will be- lieve anything. LECTERN FOR FATHER Elderly brother and sister came to see the minuter in the old -uid A fellow really shouldn't be he gels who never wears a red suit? may despise religion in any of its forms but what can an atheist or an agnostic have to say against a dog? I turned to my dog, Joe, a beau- tiful Kceshond, who is willing to share a New York apartment with us, and I read him Mr. WhitnuU's paragraph but he understood not a word of it. any more than 1 did. He blinked his eyes and looked very wise, as though to say: "What fools tlie.se mortals I agreed with him. In another paragraph, Whitnall writes: These men (founding fa- thers) intended to create a gov- ernment and society which would free tin- minds and souls of men forever from the horrors of tradi- tional eccle.siastici.5in." What has "traditional eccles- iasticism" to do with the religious outgiving of the human soul? Ec- clesiasticism has to do with the gov- ernment of churches which is no more than setting up the rules and regulations of a club or a cor- poration. Religion is the acceptance who governs the cosmos and all that is therein and whom men wor- ship and to whom they pray. Ii's amazing the day by day im- provement in youngsters' behavior: In the Judaic-Christian culture, out of this relationship of man to God has come the natural law by which men conduct themselves be- cause it i.s light so to do. A philos- ophic mind must take a distinction between the natural law and man- made laws. For instance, man in various legislatures may pass a what kind ofjlnw regarding the size of sheets on ot from a fellow bed in a hotel. No morality is Anything except, involved in its implementation In fact, such a law might be passed only to increase the consumption during a period when the consump- Freedom's Might O MONDAY, DECEMBER MAKING A GO OF LIFE BY ROY L. SMITk PRAYING TO A PERSONAL GOD MONDAY Read Psalm 120 Some-ONE will hear. The second assumption follows logically upon the first. If we are praying to some-ONE and not to some-THLNG, then we have a right to assume that some-ONE hears. Personalities are able to communicate with one another. There may be barriers of language, distance, and experience which make U difficult for two persons to un- derstand one another's language, but at least on some level they can reach an understanding, It may be only a gesture but it conveys an idea, and the passing on of idea from one personality to another Is the beginning of knowledge. That a deep mystery is involved 111 the thought that we can com- municate with God must be admitted, but a very great deal of life by- passes th physical pears as intellectual labor. But we do not cease eating because we cannot understand the mystery by which a plain meal finally emerges as the so- lution of an intellectual problem. If it seems difficult to believe that the God of all the universe is abls to hear you and at the same time lend n listening ear to all the appeal! that go up from his other children, then consider for a moment the ver- satility of the sun. The rays that come to you come to no other person in ill the universe. They arc yours and yours alone. If it is possible for the mn to distribute its wealth and warmth to all men, is it not reasonable .0 assume that our heavenly Father can give his attention to all his children? For the mercy and patience which have been extended to me and me especially, dear Father, I offer (hee my profound and grateful thanks. I will walk this day as If I am surrounded hy thy personal care and solici- tude because 1 am thine. Amen. Go back over two of the conversations of today in which you shared. Was there anything in either of them you would not have wanted your friends to hear? Was there anything in them you would not wanted a holy God to hear? From "Making a Go of by Roy L, Smith, published and copyrighted by Abingdon Press. Do You Remember 50 Years Ago Benton Harbor Elks lodge held s annual "Lodge of Sorrow" yestcr- ay at the Bell opera house. Me- loriiil services were held for five eparted brothers. Failure of the steamer City of 3enton Harbor to maintain a speed 18 miles an hour was guaranteed y Craig Shipbuilding Co. of ihio which overhauled the Graham Si Morton vessel, has resulted in a .lit for being filed by the ical firm to recover damages. December term of circuit court onvened in St. Joseph this morning tha oalamier somewhat sliort- necl when several cases listed for ial and hearing were canceled due i deaths of plaintiffs. Both house of Congress assembled or the 49th session at noon today j I., Ci ith a message from President Roo-. Olp evelt expected tomorrow. vices or vaporizers in their business places after hours to notify his de- partment, to avoid unnecessary damage- in the event an alnrm is turned in. Deputy Sheriff John Mammina, Benton Harbor, resigned his post at the sheriff's office and will leave this week for Dallas, Texas. He will operate a new tourist court on US- 80, between Dallas and Fort Worth. Robert Rinker, Buchanan, who was Collier Hears 7 Guilty Pleas Seven persons pleaded guilty to discharged from the Army last month replaces Mammina, Only five building permits, au- thorizing a tola! of in new construcUon and repairs here were issued from the office of the Ben- ton Harbor city engineer during the week past. Ticket 5 Drivers eiavor, needs a calendar to toll tlntition of cot'on small. When m 11-II IIILIL I Christmas a just around the I llle consumption of cotton increas coiner? i es, the law may be inadvisable, or sheets might br- made of some other GKl-AT urn VTIX mg. They had heard the coiwre'-a-j Two iri-inK Natural low is eternal universal, tion wits building a new church ancl'thp fnt' i i unchangeable because it is God's they came to discuss making a a e e gaoed i, 1'd'irT., 'T is "m subject temporary modest gift in their father's mem- h iilnm A d-sP "K1 certain to adjustments which man makes for mem .bieakjjut in the coming session of practical reasons. Not everything therefore which we coll "crimes" which. is nn infraction of a moral system. i nm ory. He had been a loving and hard- u... r__ ._i __ h M- working member for more than 50 years. Basis for the dispute. dox had ten what eve its outcome, is certain to proposals made last April bv the Father had" how "to "them Committee on BpfK suras? rhc-re was a fund, the Income to determine the wnich went to further the cause of charged shippers religion. Every year came the ques-i Thc i, tion of how to use it- nnp voar i' scholarship for rates are opposed to this i Mjnoiarsmp lor a young theological I' -irim nH o new church. Brother was an L, wollld bc able to lower their in the broadest aspect that is probably impossible. But a good man can and gener- ally docs try (o follow, in his own life, the natural law, as diligently as his nature will permit. It is God's law and makes for an order- ly life for the individual and among his family. It is what the first 100 or !5fl words of the Declaration of written 25 Years Ago The decision of the Michigan Su- irerne Court whereby riparian own- rs of property along the shores of he Great Lakes are given virtual itle to the water's edge was the ubject of much favorable comment i tha twin cities today. It was aled as the beginning of new lake ront development by realtors. Berrien county school executives ttendcd a dinner at the Hotel Vhitcomb in St. Joseph this noon i connection with the mid-winter leeting of the Berrien County Su- erintendents' association. Prank Heffner, one of Benton [arbor's most popular clothiers to- ay became president of the city's ewest mercantile firm nc. A series of first meetings, prc- mlnary to paving roads included the county's 1931 Covert road rograni, are scheduled for tomor- ow, it was announced at the of- fice of the Berrien County road commission's office today. 10 Years Ago The tanker ship Mercury, sailing ticketed by Friday on Five motorists were the St. Joseph police various charges. They and the charges were: Speeding Ray Block, Jr. Co- loca: Lester R. Runge, route 1, St. Joseph: Louie Hegedas, Muskegon; Richard Dcchert, route 2, Benton Harbor. various charges when arraigned before St. Joseph Mu- Friday nicipal Judge Joseph Collier, Jr. They and the charges were: Speeding Donald E. Wedde, route 1, St. Joseph, fine and costs; Ralph Dahn, 1394 Ogden avenue, Benton Harbor, fine and S4.30 costs, Socrates Rantis, Chi- cago, 111., fine and costs. No operator's license William Ewers, St. James street, Benton Harbor, fine and costs. Running stop sign Willis L. Blosser, Baroda, fine and costs. Defective muffler Donald Disterheft, Eau Claire, fine and costs. Drunk and disorderly Wendel Melburn, Coloma, fine and costs. Running stop sign Bush, Grand Rapids. Warden Glass GETTYSBURG, Pa.. Dec. Bullet proof glass has been installed s in the windows of President Eisen- hower's temporary office here. White House Press Secretary James C. Hngerty said this is usual precautionary measure is taken very time the occupies a ground floor office.' "the that Four Drivers Get Six Tickets Two persons were given a pair of traffic tickets each Friday by Ben- ton Harbor police. Plorian M. Huber, route 3, was given summonses for speeding and having improper plates. Frank Por- ter, Napier avenue, was charged with careless driving and not having mi operator's license on his person. Speeding tickets went to Donald C. Swanson, 1887 Broadway, and to Henry L. Christopher, 347 Walnut street. Named To Committee MIAMI, Dec, S (AP) Mayor Claude Verduin of Grand Haven, Mich., has been elected to a two year term as a member of the ex- President ccutive committee of the American temporary office burg postoffice. is in the Gettys- end, and is scheduled for a third trip today unless the 24-hour na- tional maritime strike "The Mercury is due with a million-gallon .V Rdptisl Pldll Program WATEBVLIET, Dec. 5 The an- interfei-s. "ual Christmas pot-luck supper of toniqht 'he Midway Baptist, church will be cargo of held Thursday, Dec. 8, at p. m gasoline, and we have not had any! at. the Coloma township hall information to the contrary." said Patrick J. McMullen of the Thoisen- Clemens gasoline terminal here, Municipal association. SHOP AROUND Get Our Prices Before Von Burr Watervliet Furniture Name flrands Li.k4.it IT'S SMART TO SAVE Huge The.iler tttdg.. Show Room Rebekahs' Yule Party On Dec. 13 NEW BUFFALO, Dec. 5 An- nouncement was made at a recent meeting of the LaMjirbelh Rebekah lodse at village hall that the Christmas party and dinner will be ay, Dec. 13, at village embers are asked to bring a 50 cent gift and ft covered dish. Entertainment chairman le Mrs. Edna Schroeder. Mrs. Roman Kottsick was nom- inated as noble grand; Miss Ruth Kremske, vice grand; Mrs. Wilbur Shermak, secretary; Mrs. Margaret Jones, treasurer and Mrs. Schroed- er, degree staff captain. A report on the Rebekah assemb- ly was given by Mrs. Leo Giossin- ?ers, and refreshments were served by Mrs. Frank. Kaspar and her corn- Mrs. Shermak and mittee. Mrs. Jones, Miss Kremske were remembered on their birthdays. Marriage Applications PAW PAW, Deo. follow- ng persons have filed marriage icense applications Rex S. Martin, Van Buren county clerk: Chauncey B. Hill, 23, of route 1, South Haven, and Lucille E. Stall, 9, of Holland. Robert O. Baldwin, 24, and Dcnise H. Martinson, 24, both of Lawton, Anton Klias, 69, of Paw Paw, and jjubica Klemenic, 56, of route 1, South Haven. John H. Bucher, 40, of Decatur, and Eleanor Pore, 39, of Knlama- to. Jerry Ellis, 19, and Dorothy E. Black, 18, of Breedsville. Dixoii Yates Quiz Resumes In Capital WASHINGTON, Dec. Senate antimonopoly subcommittee pursuing what Chairman Kefauver (D-Teun) has called "a criminal side" to the abandoned Dixon- Yates power contract called gov- ernment officials for questioning today. Among the witnesses scheduled for the public hearing were Adm. Lewis L. Strauss, chairman of the Atomic Energy commission. and Rowland Hughes, director of the budget bureau. Both agencies played a key part in framing the contract for a priv- ate steam plant at West Memphis, Ark., to feed power into the Ten- nessee Valley Authority (TV A) system to replace TV A power need- ed for atomic installations. The contract for the 107 million dollar power plant, negotiated by the AEC with the Dixon-Yates utility group at President Eisen- hower's direction, was canceled after the City of Memphis, Tenn., a major TVA customer, announced it would build its own power plant. Last .month Strauss announced that the AEC had repudiated the contract a decision which meant the AEC would make no cancel- lation payments. The decision was based on a legal opinion that "there is a substantial question as to whether there were material vio- lations by law find public policy Di.xon-Yates said it would ooa- test the decision in the courts. BENTON HARBOR PEOPLE WHO WERE RUPTURED When ihey came in 3 months ago, report RUPTURE NO LONGER COMES OUT! Let us show you how you may have IMMEDIATE and LASTING RELIEF without time off from work or play. NO INJECTIONS, NO STRAPS, NO BELTS or BUCKLES. SYKES HERNIA CONTROL SERVICE is recognized as the least expensive, most satisfactory method of life- time RUPTURE RELIEF. We Specialize in hard to fit, difficult post-operative cates since 1916. SKE F. K. ANDRKWS ONE DAY ONLY Wednesday, December 7 n> A. M. to 8 p. M. VINCENT HOTEL Benton Harbor Sykc.s Hernia Srrvire Chicago, HI. Women of the missionary guild will be hostesses. The program will include special music, carol sing- Fire Chief Ray Hall asked that Jim; and films on the work "of "the merchants who intend to use in-! Rural Bible Mission. "Uncle Bob" sccticide ditfnsors, fumigating de- Shannon will speak I- Thomas Jefferson, spea'ks about. new church. Brother was an active'- member in his own town To him 'vculd oven be able to giving to a more liberal church bus operations, loomed all right. Daughter vJ, n thcy wollld be what she called a straight, sincere. e" of agnostic. But she had promised her Thc American Trucking Industry father to administer the trust faith- ectills a fund for fully, So she had to be orthodox "Shting these proposals, claims Hint too. the railroads already enjoy a strong- Quietly the minister went down er position than the the list of needs. Communion kit-. lt'uckcrs, who receive no .subsidies Chen? No. This? That? Then he iand ni'e nlore tightly regulated than got to Lectern in his alphabetical tnc railroads. T11C Sland tnat receive no such direct held the Holy Word, from which subsidies as railroads But the lessons were read-that would receive an indirect subsidy in the please Father. They added a new.i form of piiblicly-nnanced md mi fine Book. It was for old and roads roads tZv conservative and straight-laced i don't have o provide ml modern and sociological. For every-'their own righT-of-wa no ,cl d one in that church the Word on tracks ami signals The Cf' thc mattcr was'rail roads, on the other hand main Snc made Rnd "cry-jtajn_that_ those proposals, if acce Community College t. Differ- We liclieve in keeping ahrensl of ail Ihe Newest Discoveries, so lha( we can supply you wifh any Drugs y o u r Doctor may pre- Free Delivery. which helps all men thfrm'. fcv, imu tjjLin- selves as part of a great and .in- clent Plan. At the reading or the Word they meet and are as one "In the beginning was the Word, SEASON TICKETS GOOD FOR ADMISSIONS Usable as single admission or jjraup arlmissions in ;my (oliilinij 12. PRICE 5 FIRST HOME GAME Wilh Muskegon Wed., Deo. Armory Tickets Ati Fidelity Drug Benton Harbor Gjrtlner's Armory (Wednesday) Any Community College Student The World's Original and Finest Washer-Dryer Ali-in-One All New 1956 6ENDIX DUOMATIC IT WASHES with the best, cleanest, most thorough and gentle ac- tion the world has ever known. IT DRIES quickly, com- pletely, gently and safe- ly with famous RENDIX FLUFF 'N' TUMBLE ACTION. 95 E-Z Ttrms Tritft-lm 95 Wall Si. EETER' Ph. WA 5-2104 S Benton Harbor   

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