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Adrian Daily Telegram Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1942 - Page 1

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Location: Adrian, Michigan

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   Adrian Daily Telegram (Newspaper) - November 27, 1942, Adrian, Michigan                                Continued Cold Weather Details on Page Tiro NOVEMBER 1942 PRICE 3 FRENCH FLEET IS SCUTTLED OF If ffiiSARY GAS But Jeffers Declares Immedi ate Nationwide Rationing Is Imperative THE PRESIDENT ORDERS IT By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ers and war workers will be al lowed necessary gasoline to meet their Rubber Administra tor William Jeffers told senate investigators today in reiteratin that immediate nationwide ra tioning was an absolute neces Jeffers to Capitol Hil backed by President Roosevelts order of yesterday that nation ivide gasoline rationing should go into effect 1 to conserve rub despite protests from Con gress Testifying before the specia Senate Defense Investigating Com Jeffers disclosed he hat asked Price Administrator Leon Henderson and Transportation Di rector Joseph Eastman to make changes in the rationing program for farmers and war I suggested to that farmers and stockmen gener ally have a very necessary use for trucks and that pending ironing out of local difficulties they shoulc be given to inderstand that thej are to continue their normal op erations until such time as their individual needs are In the case of war he said in a memorandum that ra tion boards should be governed recommendations of management labor boards set up to determine individual needs of the If there are any he as they will be resolved in such a way as to preclude the pos sibility of there being any diffi culty in geople generally going about their activities without in until the matter can be straightened Face Rationing Problem With no new rubber Jeffers we face the ab soute necessity of the rationing which will enable us to continue essential driving through the fall of 1943 and spring of Jeffers said the production of synthetic rubber was clouded by ifs incuding a big If in regard to the success of the processes and the size and continuity of out He added While all the experiments are and the outlook is reasona bly I deem it plain com mon sense at a time like this to err on the side of President Roosevelts order left congressional opponents of ration1 ing with the alternative of giving up the fight or carrying it to the floor of They huriedly called a meeting to decide whether to proceed with legislation that would stay ration ing by statute for from 90 days to six months but privately they ex pressed belief that there was little they could A special Senate War Investi gating seeking to de velop the facts on both sides of the rationing called Petro leum Coordinator Harold Rubber Administrator William Price Administrator Leon Henderson and Transportation Di rector Joseph Eastman before it Going to Kansas City The committee planned to go to Kansas City next week to hear midwestern civic and representatives of oil com There has been so much com both from the midwest people and midwest congressmen against extension of gasoline ra tioning 1 that the committee thought it best to hear both sides of the rationing Chairman Truman told The Presidents announced last emphasized that the need for extending what Roosevelt preferred to call mile age rationing as a rubber con servation measure was becoming more acute We must do everything within our power to see that the program starts 1 because victory must not be delayed through failure to support our fighting the President said in identical letters to Jeffers and The text of the Presidents letter to Jeffers and Henderson follows Following submission of the Baruch rubber report to me in I asked that mileage rationing be extended throughout the Certain printing and transportation problems made it necessary to delay the program until Turn to Gas Page 2 AUCTIONS northwest of Hud Victor See on Market Public east of Hud son Victor See on Market YANKS ROLL THROUGH ALGERIA An American tank a selfpropelled 105 artillery piece for antitank rolls across the Algerian countryside after the Allied landings in North APTelemat from Army Signal Corps Seaman Edmund Alexander Horger Attended Marys High The navys losses in wound ed or missing since Pearl Harbor totals officers and The 1st of missing included one Adrian Up to the Navy Depart ment reported last the Marine Corps and Coast ualties wounded and missing as a result of war operations in all parts of the The total was disclosed with the release of casualty list 17 con for local the names of 774 wounded and missing reported to next of kin from 1 through The 1st included 304 252 wound ed and 191 The list included the names of 26 men whose next of kin reside in Eleven were listed as dead six wounded and nine miss Among those reported as missing was Seaman First Class Edmund Alexander son of and Edmund Horger of 139 Union 19 years enlisted in the Navy two years ago and entered active service when he became 18 years He then for six months at a Rhode Island naval base and was then stationed at San Diego for three At the time of the De cember 7 attack on Pearl Horger was aboard a ship which vas sunk in the When his parents last heard from he vas serving in the south Pacific Graduating from Marys ligh school in Horger wa employed in the mailing depart ment of The Telegram before his In addition to and Horger have four other three of which are in active serv Staff Charles is be ieved to be stationed in England Robert is now receiving offi cers training at Fort and Francis is now stationed vith a coast artillery unit in Pan All of the men The ourth Joseph is a student it the University ofDetroit and is attempting to enlist in the Army as an avjation The total registration of Lena vee county automobiles for gas oline rationing last week was according to the rationing board figures given out Al so 43 motorcycles were registered n the schools throughout the The rationing board is receiving housands of applicationsfor sup plemental B and C and some employees of the board worked in their homes yesterday o tailor books in preparation for the December 1 Work is going on and volunteer vorkers are at the court house each night to process the applica The board set up an information lesk in the hall outside the office or the convenience of the public oday An employee of the board s at the desk to assist persons in illing out applications and an swering New Low Hit In Holiday Accidents By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A wellfed America saw its first Thanksgiving Day of the war bring what probably was a new low in the number of fatal accidents for the holiday as uninterrupted pro gasoline rationing and the absence of many now in the armed services joined to reduce sharplj the flow of In contrast to past Thanksgiving reports of death by violent means trickled Early 78 persons had been re ported 28 in eight by trains and42 in conl mine and by drown Sudden death last Thanksgiving By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Deep snow blanketed sections of Michigans northern peninsula to day after a Thanksgiving Day storm accompanied by a precipit ous drop in together causing some danger to deer hunt It was the areas worst storm in three Although the storm was general throughout the the cop per bore the brunt of it with an hourslong fall choking highxyays to the extent that a number of secondary roads were still drifted More than a foot of snow fell in the eastern end of Marquette county in less than The fall was also heavy at Houghton and some precipitation was re ported at Escanaba and Sault County highway crews went out in force to keep the main roads During the day the tem perature in Marquette fell from 40 degrees to A number of citizens went about downtown Marquelte on State police brought nine strand ed hunters into Marquette after their automobiles had bogged down in snow in the Saux Head lake region about 20 miles north of the The hunters walked five miles to reach a The drifts virtually buried a number of cars in Ne gaunee and Scores of others were stalled on the high Lake vessels had received storm warnings from the United States weather bureau on Wednesday and all were believed to have reached GASOLINE COUPONS MUST HAVE NUMBERS OF LICENSE PLATES Gasoline station operators and automobile owners were told to day by the county rationing board that license numbers and the state of registration must be writ ten on the back of gasoline cou pons when they are turned in for jasoline after rationing Holders of C 21 and T2 ration books must write t he iicense number and state of regis tration of the vehicle for which such ration was issued on the back of the In the case of in terchangeable coupon issued Tor official or fleet tho information shall be the official or fleet designation and the state and city in which the principal of 5ce of the fleet operator is In the case of nonhighway ra tion the purchaser must write his name as they appear on cover of the In the case of bulk the purchaser must sign his name and All signing must be done in ink or ink Thanksgiving Observed By Our Fighting Men Abroad By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS America plunged back into the job of making hash of the Axis to day after beating its lustiest drum stick tattoo on Except for a brief interlude of religious observance and a heavier thanusual dinner yesterday was many another for most Americans who kept the factories cr the spirit wandered farther from jts native land than ever spreading overseas to Americas fighting men in far corners of the In England where London news papers explained the significance of the thousands of British homes were opened to American Roast pork instead of the traditional turkey was the main dish at overseas Special services were held for Americans in Westminister Many Catholics observed Thanks giving at Westminister Cathedral and the Jews at West End Syna President Roosevelts proclama tion giving thanks for the great est harvest in the history of our was read in London by Ambassador Winant who added an expression of gratitude for recent the sick and wounded of both Britain and America received a touch of of turkey donated to the hospitals by the United States Tables Laden With Turkey In the mess tables of our troops held plenty of turkey and tHe menus bore a mes sage written by a Gerald Scanlon of of fering thanks to the Supreme Be ing and Father of We are it for the rich heritage that is ours and the assurance that the spirit and motives which inspired the Pilgrim fathers are to be found in the fight ing men of the United States forces wherever they may On the home many war plant bulletin boards bore a greet ing to workers from Eisen commanderinchief of the expeditionary forces in North Af On this Thanksgiving Eis enhower let us thank God for the American labor and has given us the weapons and the equipment with which to conduct our North African More power to The high officials of the government and of the Army and participated in prayer and song service in the While After the nationally broad cast and Roose velt and a few guests sat down to a dinner of roast Then the President and his staff went back to work on a full sched ule of wartime 5 Tons pf Metal Likely at Matinee Salvage officials are hoping that another fouror five tons of scrap metal be collected tomorrow morning at the second scrap mat nee for Adrian boys and girls at the Croswell Five pounds of scrap metal will be the admis sion for the matinee starting at 0 As a special inducement or boys and girls to attend and contribute scrap a Autry The Singing has been obtained for the ity trucks be on hand to col lect the Clash With Axis Forces at 25 Miles South of Bizerte RAID TUNIS AIRDROME By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS spear heads were reported today to have lanced to a point 15 miles from Tunis and to have clashed with Axis forces at a commun ications junction 25 miles south of In an effort to drive a wedge between the fortified cap ital and the naval base at Both developments were an nounced in a Berlin radio broad i The position of the task force striking at Tunis was not but an Allied communique earlier announced that British First Army striking had captured Mejez El 30 miles southwest of over stiff resistance and were advanc ing Mateur lies athwart the railway line and one of two highways be tween Tunis and in which Hitler has concentrated the ma jority of German and Italian troops in London com mentators estimate their numbers at If is 40 miles north west of the to ward the Mediterranean runs another highway between Bi zerte and The Morocco radio said all ground engagements this fought amid the first showers of the Tunisian rainy had been on a small It reported the French forces under Hen ri Giraud were advancing rapidly eastward in cooperation with the British and American The need for disciplined speed was indicated by the German Italian troop movements from Lib ya and Sicily despite Allied air and were shorten ing the manpower Authoritative London quarters estimated the Germans now had about men in northern Tu several thousand more ready to board transports in Sicily and between and transferred from western Libya to man coastal defenses against the French and American divisions perhaps the British See MEDITERRANEAN Page 11 ON LAKE Once more Adrian has a lake at its back door and water depart ment officials believe it will Two wekes ago most of the wat er in the reservoir impounded be hind the citys recently completed Wolf Creek dam was released lo enable workmen to sink a six foot deep barrier of clay to stop leak age around one end of the superintendent of the said today that the leakage was reduced about half by the re The rest of the leakage is just slow seepage that probably will disappear in about two years he The valves in the dam were closed at 5 oclock Monday after noon and at 11 oclock yesterday less than three days lat the reservoir was Smith said that he didnt know how many of the fish that were placedin the reservoir some lime ago were lost in the operation but that the valves were opened as arefully as Although the water was ten feet deep at the dam while repair operations were being carried that amount of water scarcely overflowed the banks of Wolf Creek which meant that the lake was practically TOM IN Fourteen persons were admitted lo United States citizenship Wed nesday afternoon at the court with Judge Rath bun of circuit court The new citizens and their for mer nationalities are John Hadas of Czechoslovakian Otto Hansen of German Elizabeth Walper of German Mary Stewart of Brit ish Bridget Ward of Brit ish William Arthur Engel of Adrian British Isabel Pearce of British Frank Tdmecekof Czechoslovakian Frank tolezal of Czechoslova dan Beatrice Currie of British John Wood of British Mildred Steward of Clay British Flora Denecker of Belgian and Margaret Bech tol of The examinations were conduct ed by Donald Donohue of the De troit office of the Federal Bureau Another Hitler Promise Broken As Germans Seize Toulon All France Occupied BTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS ALLIED HEADQUARTERS In by strong and wellequipped marine Japanese troops crammed into the narrow BunaGona beachhead are holding their major positions in the face of daylong air assaults and steady but slight ly abated pressure from allied ground Comparatively meager official reports from the New Guinea front today showed little geogra phical change in the battle picture in the last 24 But a check on the Japanese dead confirmed earlier indications that the despite severe blows by Douglas thurs aerial had suc ceeded in bringing reinforcements into Since the night of 19 Unit ed States and Australian bombers have sunk a Japanese four destroyers and two landing have heavily hit and probably sunk a fifth destroyer and dam aged another moving toward the 12mile shoreline still in Tomatore Horiis A dispatch from the New Guinea front said fanatical Japanese re sistance and beautifully placed defense positions confronted American troops in the Papuan peninsula but they determined to the GainsMade Tortuously Gains were made by feet and by enemy gun posi tions fell one by Major Beaver of commented that whoever said the Japanese cant fight de fensively are The Japanese are in there to stay until we kill he They have had a long to prepare for our drive and they have made the most of It may take a long time to dislodge but we will do Todays allied headquarters com munique said some Japanese dead bore marine insignia and Ybko suka depot indicating special landing forces of shock and their new uniforms and excellent physical condition confirmed their recent landing by Japanese naval forces in the fre quent sorties off the north The Yokosuka Sasebo and Kure are the principal stations from which the Japanese navy dis patches the empires landing force shock Attacking allied air units were out in force throughout but so were Japanese Formations of zero fighters and allied bombers and fighters worked n relays over the narrow battle interrupting low level at tacks occasionally for dogfight Six zeros were said to have been shot down against a loss of three and Australian Turn to AUSTRALIA Page 11 THINGS QUIET ON THE DESERT 27 British Middle East high command said for the first since the British eighth armys offensive was launched against Rommels El Ala mein that there is nothing to report from our land forces and aerial activity was rela tively A large force of our medium bombers attacked a landing grounds at Marble west of El on the night of the communique Bombs fell among dispersed air causing gasoline depots and oil anks were declared fired at Tunis by raiders cooperating with the fliers Dwight Eisenhowers and direct were scored on railway in freight yards and ware Three Axis ships were damaged in a series of at sea and in the communique Yesterday a northbound Junk ers carrying was at tacked by our twinengined fight ers and shot down into the sea off Cape Bon it was de It was not explained why Axis troops would be flying north when Hitlers efforts are directed toward reinforcing Axis regiments in but such a party might be staff members heading for the Sjcialian The communique said all Allied planes assigned to the operations Russians Close In On Nazi Invaders By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS fighting swirled across the life lines of Hitlers partially trapped Stalingrad siege armies today as latest battle reports indicated a fastwheeling Soviet force was driving in from the west on the in vaders Aimed at annihilation of the es timated survivors of Axis legions that have clawed at Stalin grad for three the Rus sians VolgaDon offensive surged into its ninth day with en emy soldiers officially reported killed or captured outside the city and possibly The German radio acknowledged the Russians still were on the of fensive around Stalingrad and al so expanded on its earlier reports of a major Soviet drive in the Rzhev area 600 miles to the Broadcasts told of heavy fighting at ISO miles due west of and said Red Troops were operating west of Toropets which is about 240 miles northwest of Moscow and only 135 miles from the Latvian Soviet communiques again made no mention of these operations which indicate that the Russians may entering into a winter offensive much more extensive than the 194142 cold weather drive threw back from the gates of LastBights special andregular communiqtTes like all the earlier ones on this gave no clear indication of just how the various Red Army columns were moving in the wide open warfare that was precipitated by the Russian thrusts from the south and north west of Stalingrad and it was ap parent that there were no clearlv defined Enemy Thrown Back after listing seven towns captured in the Don the special communique signifi cantly In this sector the Red army threw remaining enemy units on to the eastern banks of the River This gave a picture of the Rus sians headed eastward in an ad vanced phase of a great circling movement aimed at pinning the besiegers into the 45mile wide strip between the Don and the Vol ga and then driving them against the bayonets of the dogged Stalin grad The fluid state of the lines west and northwest of Stalingrad and the lack of strategic details in the communiques made it impos sible to say how near the Russians Turn to RUSSIANS Page 11 BULLETINS heavy ranging ahead of the British eighth made a punishing attack yesterday on main Axis base in Af and also raided 100 miles to the it was announced The big fourmotored bombers flew through bad weather to plunge their bombs on shipping in Tripolis harbor and on the Spanish the announcement NEW New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune said today reports were current in Washington of a major cabinet reorganization which would assign Harold Ickes as secretary of labor to consolidate control of war manpower and pro curement under civilian jurisdic An executive order to accomplish the revision had been the paper The reported shuffle would in volve naming secretary of the to the labor post held by Frances Perkins and would place under Ickes control the man power jurisdiction now belonging to Paul war manpower commissioner and federal security 27 a tilth of the whole German air orce that was facing the Russians before the outbreak of American and British operations in French North Africa has been moved to ace the new Sir Archibald British de clared In addition to the Italian air orce we are engaging in the home and African waters more than half the German air he Last Vestige of Frances Liberties Are Erased By Sudden Move By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Defiant French seamen scuttled the entire French naval squadron of 62 warships at Toulon today as ruthlessly crushing the last of Frances free homeland under the Nazi seized the big French naval base after overcoming resist A Nazi communique did not tell which three bat sunk but a Vichy broadcast recorded by Reuters an nounced By orders of Admiral De La vessels of the French squad ron at Toulon scuttled At 10 there was not one vessel Reuters heard a Vichy broadcast today saying that Admiral Darlan and General Giraud had been de prived of their French All the captains stood on the bridge until their ships sank most of them lost their said the and many lives were lost both among the defenders and the Germans when the crews opened fire to hold off the Germans until the scuttling could be At the moment tnat Nazi arm ored columns entered Toulon at 4 said the Vichy broad cast quoting a dispatch from Mar Admiral De La Borde gave the order which was im mediately carried out from one big force of German bombers spotted the ships at their anchorages before it while other bombers sowed magnetic mines to block the road stead This sudden in violation of Hitlers specific pro voked the first officiallyrecorded resistance to the Germans by French armedforces on home soil since the armistice of Compieene in Final Bid for Liberty It was the final bid by French men for their for with it the last trace of their sovereignty was the last spot of unoccupied motherland seizedand the whole country turned over to Nazi military A German communique franklv attributed the jointly ordered by Hitler and to fear of the growing Allied might in North Africa and the refusal of French armed forces to submit to the Axis An accompanying letter to Mar shal Petain informed the French chief of state that Field Marsha Rudolf Gerd von Rundstedt will be in charge of all measures deem ed necessary and will take all deci sions in French French naval and army forc es were demobilized by Hitlers The armistice of 1940 had allowed France an army of SO 000 The communique contained only the line that part of the French fleet has scuttled itself and it was not known which or how many of the 62 French war ing three Frances Mediterranean fleet were at the bottom of Toulon The order to enter Toulon was given by the Axis war leaders last night to prevent the French fleet from putting to sea as planned and to demobilize unsure contingents of the French it France Eradicated with one stroke every trace of French sovereignty was acre of her homeland was left free of the she became subject to absolute Nazi even her meager means of selfdefense were made as Hitler tried to defend his Nazi Europe from the threat of invasion across the Mediterranean and of insurrection against his I am determined not in any give Europe over to chaos by allowing a free hand to these agi Hitler wrote Petain appar ently meaning his opponents gen erally and the fighting French and antiAxis Vichy French I hope it will be pos sible give back to France an army wfiose officers at least obey the chief of I am convinced you took no part in any of these but I am compelled to carry this war through to the Hitler accused Admiral Jean Darlan of having once more be trayed Germany and With a frank avowal of the peril in which he stands from his ene mies within Europe as well as out Hitler wrote to Vichys aged marshal to TOULON Paae 11   

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