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Adrian Daily Telegram: Friday, September 18, 1942 - Page 1

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   Adrian Daily Telegram (Newspaper) - September 18, 1942, Adrian, Michigan                                ADRIAN DAILY TELEGRAM SEPTEMBER 1942 Not Much Change in Temperature CWoUxr Detail OB PRICE 3 GERMANS DRIVEN FROM STALINGRAD OPA WILL TIRE AND One Set Used Tires Sold for Official Says at Meeting INSPECTOR LAXITY NOTED Lenawee county tire and automo bile dealers were warned last night at a meeting at the court house that beginning today strict enforce ment of the regulations governing the sale of tires and cars would be carried out here by the The statement was made by Willard Kime of the state who call ed a meeting of tire and automo bile dealers after a months in vestigation showed that terrible laxity concerning OPA rules ex ists The meeting was attended by 20 Kime explained that the OPA first began its investiga tion when ten reports of violations In Lenawee county had reached the Lansing We sent a man to look the situation Kime and it wasnt long be fore he called for The OPA spokesman stated that serious violations of the rules had been discovered but that it ap peared that they were largely due to a terrible laxity in obtaining general knowledge of the rules governing both tires and automo SO Violations Discovered Approximately 30 instances of violations have been discovered in the Kime He in dicated that two or three were flagrant attempts at evasion and that the data may be sent to the Department of Justice in Washing ton for criminal The Investigation will continue he The sale of used automobile tires at excessive prices is the most common according to In one instance a set of used automobile tires sold at 550 Good used tires appear to sell for from to he went while the maximum price allowed by the OPA is for a x 16 Another vio lation which the OPA is looking for particularly is the bumping Increasing of mileage on the speedometer of an automobile so that the owner can apply for a permit to buy a new He did not cite any instances of this viola Kime also said that the in vestigation showed laxity among official tire inspectors who pass on the fitness of a tire for retread ing or He stated that such inspectors were officers of the federal government charged with a deep responsibility to conserve the nations tire supply and get the most possible mileage out of every Tires must be inspected on the he The loca tion of the the serial the size and other identifying marks must be along with the actual condition of the its tread design and whether It can be repaired or In spectors must also keep records of the inspection and give the cus tomer a sales slip showing the the grade of camelback used and the depth of the mold design If the tire is Dealers Submit Problems The entire meeting was conduct ed on a discussion basis with the dealers telling of personal exper iences and presenting individual Kime began by say ing that the OPA assumed that ignorance of the rules had led to the violations in 99 per cent of the and that it would be an edu cational meeting to show the funda mental rules laid down by the The discussion for the most part concerned the sale of new and used but later the rules con cerning the sale of new cars were reviewed Kime urged the dealers who attended to carry the information they obtained to other men in the same He also asked them to impress customers with the growing scar city of both tires and There appears to be more rub ber in Lenawee county than in most of the state of he but let me assure you that when the present supply of tires is there will be no We will have synthetic but every bit of it will be used by the military Right 51 per cent of our armed forces are fighting on retreaded and that should give you an idea of the seriousness of the rubber He also said that 67 per cent of the nations stockpile of crude rubber already has been used in the war Individuals Also Warned The individual tire owner also came in for a warning from the OPA Under the OPA an individual automobile owner can not sell an automobile tire of his own for more than the ceiling Tom to Page FARMER BRECKEL DOES HIS BIT HOW ABOUT YOU August who lives three miles and a half northeast of put his name on the dotted line of a coupon printed in The Telegram thereby taking the first step towards starting the scrap metal on his farm on its way to the steel plants to be trans formed into armament Under his foot is part of the metal being piled up for collection after October 1 by a Lenawee county road commission And Ive got some pieces of old machinery scattered around here that I intend to gather up before the collection he I never knew that they needed scrap metal to make steel until my told me about it a few days Breckel His who is a chemist in told him just how the scrap is added to pig iron in fashioning the tons of steel plate needed for tanks and When he realized just how vital is the need for more and more scrap Breckel could see the great value of an allout drive to get in the nations And thats why he and scores of others are enrolling their support solidly behind Lenawee countys part in the campaign by signing the coupons and sending them in now so that routes for the collection starting October 1 jnay be A coupon that will lielp all start their scrap toward the steel mills appears on the farm page to The first signed coupons were received yester day and today by Richard county salvage chair and Lenawee Many more are ex pected over the week War Equipment Made In Coun ty Also to Be Shown Lenawee residents who plan to make the Victory Auction one of their mustsees when they visit the county fair next week have an op portunity to view the merchandise today and tomorrow in the win dows of three Adrian The ranging from a car ton of cigarettes to electrical appli has been donated by city Similar donations are being made and displayed through out the The idea for the a me dium for the sale of war stamps and is being used with the permission of Dave Elmans Hob by Lobby radio program and is being promoted here by the coun ty retail committee for war stamp and bond There will be four such auctions during fair two on Thursday and two on At each of the the arti cles of merchandise offered for sale will represent a piece of war equip ment and its price wil be the equiv alent in a war bond Here are some of the things to be offered for sale men and womens canned an over Turn to Page 11 rWo Kid Ferguson Pledges 18 ing he was pausing only long en ough to take some needed rest and plan his Circuit Judge Homer Ferguson of Re publican nominee for said he would embark Monday on a no kid gloves campaign against the incumbent Democratic Senator Prentiss Brown of Ferguson conferred behind clos ed doors with Harry the Republican nominee for and other party leaders They said they discussed problems of itinerary and notably how to arrange schedules so they coulddo more traveling in trains and buses than in automo The judge said he would tour the state from end to and there will be no kid gloves to my He said he would be rate congressional delays in solv ing wartime tax and ac cuse certain national legislators of being too interested in seeking tax exemptions for special groups to get their votes in the NAZIS EXECUTE 3 Sept 18 dis patch from Stockholm today re ported that three identif ied as a Jew and two had been executed in Prague for pre paring high treason and sabotage against Germany and the new order in the protectorate of Bohemia Expect Failure In Effort To Revise Parity Price Formulas Upward By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Sept 18 gressional farm leaders conceded today they were likely to lose their efforts to force an upward revision of agricultural parity price formu las in legislation designed to give President Roosevelt broad controls over the cost of Senator Bankhead who has urged that wages of farm la bor be considered among the fac tors determining how much the producer ought to receive for his said he feared the Senate Banking Committee would reject any amendment changing the basis for We wont get it over the Presi dents he told report The President wrote Chairman Wagner DNY of the Senate com mittee and Chairman Steagall D Ala of the House committee yes terday expressing unalterable op position to any change in the me thod of computing which is a price level calculated to give farmers a return equal to that of past favorable usually He was promptly joined in this opposition by Secretary of Agricul ture Wickard and Price Adminis trator Leon both of whom said any change would tend to increase the cost of Considerable sentiment was ap parent among members of the House committee for revision of the Steagall bill to eliminate the redefinition of parity and to insert specific requirements for regula tions of wages and Influential not wishing to be quoted said the re definition of raising the lev el to include all farm labor would not be approved in view of the Presidents Steagall himself told newspaper men Ive an idea there will be strong insistence that the new par ity definition be eliminated or lim ited to cover only hired labor on the Turn to INFLATION Page 2 AUCTIONS Auction east of See on Sept Andy Market Auction sale north of Llnehan See on Market TRAPPED ON THEY PLAY ACEYDUCY WAITING FOR DEATH By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN Coxswain Howard Sites of Aus a survivor of the air craft carrier told how two trapped carpenters mates fac ed death in a compartment five decks below the flight deck They were in a compartment still but there was water all around It was hopeless to try to get them The tele phones were still working and they called down to the trapped men Do you know what kinda fix youre in they called We know you cant get us but we got a helluva good aceyducey game going on down here right When you do sink put the torpedoes up We dont want it to last VERY RAID TwoThirds of Force Employed Is Wounded or Missing TROOPS WERE USED By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 18 Canadian government disclosed to day that twothirds of the Canadian armed force used in the Dieppe raid 19 was wounded or miss and said that a very high price was paid considering what was The government announced that Canadian troops were used in the Canadian which had been announced totaled A review issued by Defense Minister the first comprehensive official state ment on the summed up the raid as follows For lessons learned and the ad vantages the and particularly the land paid a very heavy The Canadian army furnished all but a small part of the land forces and suffered casualties 633 wounded and the costliest Canadian military operation of the These the statement were probably due in part to the misfortune of a chance encounter with an escorted German tanker in the English Surprise Marred Such small circumstances are often important in operations of this the statement for that mishap marred complete achievement of Out of the one armed enemy trawler was sunk and an other probably was but the incident had two results on the later land operation Turn to DIEPPE Page 2 CALLS JAPANESE JrittZK Says They Will Fight Until They Are Crushed 18 Describing Japan as our most for midable far tougher than former Ambassador Jo seph Grew told a war rally luncheon here today that the Germans cracked in 1918 and they will crack but the Japanese will fight until they are utterly who was an American dip lomat in Berlin in 1917 and Amer ican ambassador in Tokyo in indicated he was profoundly shocked to hear people in this country talk as if Germany in time would be defeated and then well mop up the Japs He agreed with those who be lieve German morale will not sur vive a series of But he in a prepared speech broad cast over the NBC network Turn to GREW Page 4 Says Petrillos Music Ruling Threatens to End 40 Per Cent of Nations Radio Programs Sept 18 Chairman James Lawrence Fly of the Federal Communications Com mission testified today that James Petrillos ban on music record ings threatened to dry up more than forty per cent of the nations radio Many he said might be left with no stations to tune Fly testified before the Interstate Commerce subcommittee on a re solution by Chairman Clark D Idaho for a full investigation of the president of the Ameri can Federation of say ing that canned music meant loss of work for has de creed that no member of his union may make records or electrical transcriptions for We must recognize the vital contribution of the musicians to the radio industry and the com pensation they receive should be commensurate with that contri Fly But just as the musicians are vital to the broadcast stations are vital to the They are performing a really great a service of great import ance to the war a we must make every ef fort to sustain Already these stations are con fronted with a shortage of the skill ed personnel and certain critical materials and items of equipment necessary for continued An industry struggling with these difficulties is now faced with the drying up of the source of over 40 per cent of its This presents a serious problem which not only must be solved but must be solved Fly presented compiled from questionnaires returned by 796 of the nations 890 to show how extensively the radio broadcast industry is dependent up on phonograph records and electri cal The charts showed that 76 per cent of the total broadcast time of the average station is devoted to musical Of this musical per cent is devoted to recorded music and per cent to live which means that per cent of the total broadcast time is devoted to recorded The figures clearly show that if the ban on recordings it will not be long before the radio broadcast industry is very serious ly Fly the stations have a supply of records on and they also have available to them the services of the transcription But this doesnt solve the Recordings wear out And of mediate stations will lose their audiences if they cant get new Fly said that whereas a goodly number of network stations will be seriously and in some cases griev ously affected by the the great bulk of the nonnetwork stations face the drying up of the source of most of their program Russians Making Supreme LastDitch Effort to Save Great City From Invaders Smashing Blow Is Struck At Jap Supply Base at Buna By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Approximately rounds of GENERAL MacArthurs Headcannon and machinegun fire were Sept Australian troops 18 loosed by the Allied raiders in a concentrated destroying or While Australian troops battled esroyng or Japanese forces in the New Guinea damaging 15 landing barges and jungles only 32 miles air line from setting fires in supply dumps which Port American fighter were visible for 25 a com planes struck a smashing blow yes muniquS terday at the enemy supply base at yuuiiucu General MacArthurs headBuna for 45 one of the quarters announced To Supervise War Programs and Schedules By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS task of assembling the jigsaw pieces of the war production pic ture for a twiceaweek scrutiny of armed services needs fell today to a newly created production com mittee headed by Charles Wil president of the General Elec tric The committee was created by the War Production Board last night and Chairman Don ald Nelson with seeing to it that programs and schedules for all phases of our war effort are In another WPB source the new unit obtains a position from which the entire war production picture can be surveyed continually to perceive the diversif ied needs of the the air navy and maritime Twice each the committee will bring together the military the Maritime Commission and WPB for a checkup Extra sessions may be called when Turn to WILSON Page 4 New Thousands Of Soldiers Arrive in Britain Sept 18 sands of American troops arrived in Britain recently to swell the ranks of the rapidly expanding United States army in this country waiting for the opening of a second front While they have been whisked away to camps announce ment of their arrival was not per mitted until They came in a typical convoy of great which were well passenger liners and disembarked at a number of Brit ish The crossing of the Atlantic was made swiftly and not a single Ger man submarine was it was Special trains waiting at the docks rushed the Americans and their supplies away from the busy ports where bombing danger is the They were taken to pre pared camps in the quiet British The arrivals consisted mainly of fighting men and antiaircraft and transport There were also hundreds of army technical experts and some army air force person The American airmen pounded attackers sweeping so low that his plane clipped off the top of a palm tree and gouged a iarge section from a wing but the pilot brought his plane home The returning pilots said they started fires which sent flame and smoke swirling up feet in this which followed a 26ton Allied bomb attack last Saturday on the Japanese air base at The assault obviously was de livered with a view to relieve pressure on the Australian forces locked in combat with the Jap anese near the village of on the southern slopes of the lofty Owen Stanley The fighting in that which the Japanese reached Wednesday after a swift eightmile apparently had abated somewhat in the Allied communique describing the action as A spokesman at Allied head said that both sides were busily maneuvering for and it appeared probable that the lull would be Turn to AUSTRALIA Page 2 4 MORE JAP REPORTEDJEST1YED 4 Others Are Hit By Torpe Navy Says Sept 18 The toll taken by United States submarines on Japans western Pacific supply lines was raised to day to 107 ships sunk or damaged the Navys report that four more enemy ships were destroyed and four others were struck by The Navys latest communique announced that the American un dersea campaign recently sent two large a medium sized tanker and a small patrol boat to the bottom of the In last nights com munique a large tanker was torpedoed and left ablaze and a large a large transport and a medium sized cargo ship were The the navy were unrelated to the continuing campaigns in the Solomon and Aleutian The last previ ous report of American submarine raids was issued Sept 3 but the navy did not indicate whether the newly announced successes had oc curred since The announced total of 107 Jap anese ships sunk or damaged since the war started was viewed in naval circles as a severe blow to the island empire in maintaining vital supply lines to her mandated bases and garrisons in the Philip pines and Thirtytwo of the vessels were naval craft of various Testimony is Taken in Shooting 2 Girls at Roff Melon Patch The justice court examination of Herbert 67 year old Raisin township farmer who was arresteS after shots from his gun injured two girls in a party which was raiding his watermelon patch Sep tember was recessed at noon to day after three witnesses offered Justice Franklin Rus sell ordered the examination re sumed at One of the girls injured during the unfortunate melon cooning the driver of the car and the doctor who attended the in jured girls testified this morning and there were two or three more witnesses to be called this after Roff is charged with felon ious intentional discharge of firearms and the reckless use ot Lois 16 year old Tecum seh girl who suffered gunshot wounds in her left thigh in the was the first witness called by Prosecuting Attorney Lawrence Her testimony started with developments after 8 oclock September when she met her Joyce attended a theater in Later they went to a confectionary store and then started she told the court They first saw a car containing five boys whom they didnt know while walking home on Adrian Street Lois The car went past and soon returned with two boys in Do you want to go for a ride the girls agreed and got into the A short dis tance outside of they picked up three more boys who were sitting beside the road and then continued Lois testified that she and her cousin didnt know that the boys were going after melons until after four of the boys had got out of the car at the Roff The four boys came back in ten or 15 minutes with she and as the last of the boys was preparing to get into the car a shot was The Thomas of hur riedly started the motor and drove toward Tecumseh amid several more It was not until they were part way to Tecumseh that she realized that she had been struck by a Lois Then she felt a stinging sensation in her thigh and found blood on her skirt to Page 11 GERMAN THRUSTS ARE HURLED Russians Start Offensive In Voronezh Area Northwest of Stalingrad By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Sept a with the banks of the Volga at their very the defenders of Stalingrad have counterat tacked and wiped out the two en emy wedges within the city in a lastditch effort to save the great manufacturing center from the the Russians said The Germans precipitated this bitter and successful Russian coun teraction by rushing into the city proper from the northwestern out and pushing almost to the cliffs overhanging the west bank of the With no choice between counter attack and the Russians A terrible battle flamed along the treelined avenues leading to the riverfront The first German units which had speared through the pointed by were forced Two successive German efforts to take Stalingrad by storm were re ported repulsed in the last 24 The first penetration into the citys announced in last nights Russian has been The midday bulle tin said that two battalions of en emy infantry again rushed into one of the streets but were forced to retreat after severe handtohand Meanwhile the Red army was credited with a new offensive in the Voronezh about 300 miles northwest of Red the Russian army said that an mortar and aerial bombardment to soften the German positions and plough paths through the enemy mine barbed wire systems and firepoints was folowedby an infantry advance in several Russians Advance Russian troops moved forward swiftly from the south and the dispatch and occupied sev eral positions around German be sieged On the north side of German defenses were said to have slowed down the but the Russians nevertheless were credit ed with their way through the On the west bank of the on the opposite side of the river from a series of important hills was re ported On the central front where the Russians have been on the offen sive for some time they were said to be pressing the foe still farther away from This evident ly is a reference to the Rzhev northwest of the Russian Red Star said that anoth er fdrtified line had been 10 German dugouts captured and 900 enemy officers and soldiers The Elite SS greater Germany division which recently appeared on this front after being taken to the rear for reorganization was report ed to have suffered a serious de having lost men and more than 60 of the divisions orig inal 110 the most vital sector of Russias whole great Turn to RUSSIANS Page 2 War At A Glance By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS RUSSIA Dramatic llth hour rally by Red Russian defenders of Stalingrad seizes initiative from German invaders and drives them from the city new attacks in Voro nezh sector takes toll after Stalin orders offensive by Russian armies on all of jitters hits southeastern Europe after air raid scare in Sofia minor German ac tivity over Britain RAF hits Bor deaux as weather spares per vaded over the Egyptian but the German radio announced a re port unconfirmed elsewhere that an Italian force had penetrated into the waters of sink ing a steamer and damaging five other PACIFIC Japanese advance again on Port Moresby with heavy fighting reported 32 miles from the city American planes assault Jap anese using aerial cannon and machine guns along with bombs British continue advance against capital of Madagascar after French refuse surrender additional British troops landed on east coast of   

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