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Adrian Daily Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Adrian Daily Telegram

Location: Adrian, Michigan

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   Adrian Daily Telegram (Newspaper) - August 25, 1942, Adrian, Michigan                                DAILY TELEGEAM Warmer Weather Details on Two AUGUST 1942 PRICE 3 AIR BATTLE RAGES IN SOLOMONS Germans Massing Huge Force For Push Against Stalingrad Chute Anti Tank Motorcycles Dropped in Caucasus Areas By THE ASSOCIATED PKESS 25 The Ger mans massed large forces of tanks on the eastern bank of the Don be fore Stalingrad today while dive bombers swarmed the skies and parachutists descended in the Don and Caucasus areas with antitank guns and motorcycles to menace further the alreadyprecarious Red army A frontline dispatch to Comso mol official paper of the young Communist said the Germans had been able to concentrate large masses of men and machines across the It said the Nazis brought up re serves during the night and attack ed at tanks being followed by men with automatic rifles while planes rained down many tons of The first wave was turned but a halfhour later more bombers appeared and another charge be Iii hard handtohand fight the Red army stuck to its trenches and refused to this dispatch Night fighting in that sector was featured by rocket and tracer bullets streaking across the sky while German siren bombs An account to Commun ist party said the parachut ists at one place landed in sufficient strength to permit their transport planes to alight on an air field and unload antitank motorcycles and Turn to Page 9 War At A Glance By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS RUSSIA boasting fate of Stalingrad will be settled before end of force Rus sians to new retreat less than 40 miles from Volga steel city as other Nazi columns strike within 85 miles of Grozny oil fields in Central Reds reveal Nazis cross Don with large tank fleets as dive bombers swarm skies and heavilyarmed parachutists drop behind Soviet SECOND FRONT London movements after Churchills return from Moscow and Near East indi cate imminent moves to take pres sure off Russia Prime Minister confers with war cabinet ECROPEAN force of 300 planes bombs Rhineland centers of Frankfurt and Wiesba with 16 planes after Flying Foreresses plaster Nazi shipyards at Le occupied by Forty Rus sian planes make night attack on Finnish fighters step up air forays artillery duels not still quiescent land CHINA reporting further report Japanese in vasion armies withdrawing from China east coast provinces to pre pare another thrust possibly on Russian India or air men blast Japanese bases in New downing four of 13 enemy planes and damaging others with out Japanese troops dispersed in Kokoda area of New Guinea ne news from THE STORY OF WORLD WAR II WILL BE TOLD NEW 25 ff Free Men Are a hu manized history of nearly three years of World War on the scene by Associated Press correspondents in collaboration with Oliver Gramling will be published in late It is a daytoday account of one of the most tragic at the same thrilling periods of all according to the farrar Rinehart of New It is whitehot and color ul ironic and some times even The book is composed of daily dispatches from AP reporters around the world tied together given an overall meaning by 38yearold author of Story of a best eller two years Swiftlymoving and dramapack Free Men Are Fighting tells chronologically what the AP cor respondents saw with their own only the toppling of na but the effects on little peo It is a peoples book on a peo ples Gramling There are some stories which do not deal lirectly with the Their pur pose is to reflect the interests of everyday people in What the correspondents gen erally have written about World r IL as well as what they con inue to is what they The is fitted heir stories may help to highlight the worlds most tragic The title of the book was taken rom President Roosevelts state ment of last July the des ert sands of along the housands of miles of battle lines n in New Zealand and and the islands of the in wartorn China and all seven men are preserve the liberties and the decencies of modern assistant general man ager of Press dedicated the book to newsmen BULLETINS 25 important base from which Japan might be is under direct attack by Chinese forces wlu have driven the Japanese in side that city in southeastern Che kiang the high commend reported The Japanese already have suf feeed great saifl a commun which announced the recap Saturday of Tcngpn in the westward Chinese drive in Kiang si 25 Brit ish said today that S Indians were killed August 19 ft Fatna and in the Shahabad Dis trict of Bihar Province when po lice opened fire on disorderly throngs attempting to damage railway track and The communique reported riots at Katra and small towns in in which police stations were A con stable was killed at Katra and a subinspector of police was shot Adrians first shipment of old phonograph be broken up and made into new ones for Ameri can soldiers all over the is shown with l commander of the William Stark Post of the American and Roswell chairman of the legions record making a final A total of pounds of ecords was collected and shipped to The local drive began during the first week in August Schroyer Authorized to Train Corps of Officers James professor of chemistry at Adrian has been appointed senior gas officer of the Lenawee County Citizens Defense it was announced by Squire county command Sehroyers responsibility will be to develop and initiate plans for the decontamination ol persons and property after enemy gas He will also be avail able as consultant in matters per taining to gas protection and the selection and training of senior gas officers throughout the Mr Chase The addition of a gas and the training of civilian volunteers throughout the county in antigas technique will be one of the next steps in perfecting the civilian de fense Chase said Schroyer will attend the state gas officers training institute in Detroit this week The in stitute will begin Friday and last until GERMAN CITIES RAIDED BY RAF 25 strong force of RAF bombers smashed al Frankfurt and Wiesbaden and oth er objectives in the upper Rhine land last night in the first RAF night attack on Germany in a the Air Ministry said The of the force sent over Germany was not dis but the announced loss of 16 planes indicated that some 300 planes took on the basis of a five per cent However bad weather over the continent last night may have contributed to the Frankfurt is on the Main River 22 miles from its confluence witl the Rhine at and is an im portant German commercial and industrial electrical supplies ant chemicals are its most importan Wiesbaden is best known as a fashionable but it is also a manufacturing city of some import ance and a communications center The Berlin radio broadcast a DNB report that German planes raided a few miles eas of Plymouth on the English south coast Besides the two railway objectives were attacked in the Low Countries by planes ot the fighter command and some locomo tives were it POUNDS OF MUSIC FOR SERVICE MEN More Than Half A Dozen Japanese Ships Damaged Enemys Attack Expected JAPS WITHDRAW CHINAS EAST CHINESE Believe Japs Plan tack on India or Australia and records were The American Le the 40 and the Womans Auxiliary took part in the headed by a committee consisting of Fetkenhier and Harold The collection of old records is Burr and persons who did not give records for the first shipment are urged to make their contributions Records may be left at Goldmans Watsons Flower or the Adrian Fire Grant Her Non Belligerent Status By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS RIO DE 25 Brazil marshaled her military strength for the test of war and moved quickly against Axis enem es within her borders today as her South neighbors act ed to simplify and lighten her Paraguay and Bolivia granted their warring neighbor the status of a nonbelli gerent yesterday as Brazil seized 17 Axis ships and closed three Axis owned banks with assets of nearly The granting of nonbelligerent rights gives Brazil the unlimited use of the airports and harbors of ler neighbor as in times of The hunt for Uboats prowling Jie South Atlantic off Brazil was intensified and an authoritative source said three were sighted yes erday and one attacked with un known A new dragnet was laid for Fifth Columnists and enemy radio The government announced the sinking of an American Lhe bound for Rio De Janeiro with The Axis vessels seized included 13 Italian and four German ships with a total tonnage of The largest German ship was the which was sabotaged by her crew and now is being As informed sources reported that a gradual mobilization of the army would soon be re servists not yet called and from all corners of the vast land came offers to Support Vargas Large groups of citizens visited the palace of President Getulio Vargas to express their Even Julio the president elect in 1930 whom Vargas ousted by sent a message from his farm applauding the govern ments While granting Brazil nonbelli gerent Argentina did not move if at from her policy of prudent neutrality and in an other move indicated she planned to avoid possible shipping diffi culties with the Axis by rerouting vessels bound for the United States around the Straits of Magellanto the west coast The state mer chant fleet offices announced that the Rio De La schedul ed to sail next month for New would go to San Fran cisco the Argentine foreign Enrique Ruiz Guinazu in a letter to the Brazilian ambas sador in Buenos said that Argentina in solidarity with the United States of Brazil reaffirms once more her faith in a perman ent regime of right and respect in the interrelations of peoples Argentina and Chile are the only South American nations still main taining jelations with the Chile was extremely cordial to her Brazilian ant Foreign Minister Ernesto Barros told the Brazilian ambassador tha Chile would not permit any kind of activities in the national terri tory or waters of Chilean jurisdic tion which might harm AUCTIONS northeast of MorencL Llnehan See on Market EXCHANGE LINER DOCKS TODAY JERSEY WO minus luttering handkerchiefs and eager awaits American diplo newspapermen and business men returning from the Orient today aboard the diplo matic exchange For when the ship docks the passengers will be submitted to a thorough examination by agents of the State and Justice De Army and NavyIhtelr Services and a process which may take several The pier will be closed to the public during the examinations and passengers will be able to greet heir relatives only after they have cleared inspection and are permit tod to leave the Investigations were begun while the liner still was at Agents on board took jegan their questioning and asked jassengers to name five citi zens who could vouch for their loy Some sources aboard the ship said it was feared that the drastic cleanup of Japans fifth column in the States after the start of the war may have resulted in an attempt t send a fresh corps of In Attorney General Biddle said precautions would be taken so that no enemy agents whom we know to be well train ed and clever could enter the First to leave the ship will be American diplomats headed by Ambassador Joseph Grew and his staff from followed by other then American citizens and then Vehicle Leaves Highway and HitsTree Three persons were injured seri and nine others suffered cuts and bruises this morning when a Fort WaynetoGrand Rapids bus slidfrom Highway miles south of Coldwater ant struck a Sheriffs officers who investigat ed said the bus suddenly went ou of swerved from side to side of the highway and finally crashed into the The lef panel of the from the seat was ripped open for 10 or 15 Robert of Cold the was brought to a hospital here and ap parently from internal injuries His condition prevented his being Miss Marjorie Battl who was returning from a vacation in suffered multiple fractures of both a shattered and is in critica She was seated directly behind the Also remaining in the hospita was Bernard of Grand suffering from head injur ie and Nine other persons were treatei at the hospital for minor injurie and were 4 JAP FIGHIER Allies Suffer No Loss In Air Battle GENERAL MacARTHURS 25 second air battle in as many days in which the Japan ese lost more than onefourth of their planes and the Allies none at all was reported in a communi que from General MacArthurs headquarters Of 13 enemy fighter planes en countered over eastern New Gui it four wereshot others were damaged and the only Allied casualty was one plane which returned to its base dam This followed the announcement yesterday that 13 out of 47 enemy planes were shot down Sunday over Again last night Japanese planes tried unsuccess fully to bombard the far northern Australian port Their bombs fell in a the communique Another for enemy avia tion occurred over New Britain it where two enemy Zero fighters tried vainly to intercept an Allied reconnaissance unit anc one was last seen In the first action reported aground in the jungle warfare on New Guinea since the said Japanese grounc patrols were dispersed at Kokoda the point where enemy forces which landed at Buna and Gona have penetrated deepest in the ov erland thrust toward Alliedheld Port ALLIED ATTACK IS URGED By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Chinese dispatches said today hat Japans invasion armies were from China east coast rovinces to prepare another thrust an attack on Russian India or In General Chiang war informed uarters agreed that some bigscale evision of Japanese plans had irompted the enemy to yield hard von territory in Chekiang and Jiangs A Chinese army spokesman said he Japanese were withdrawing be ween and troops from he two half the iriginal invasion aban loning city city to Chiangs The China appealing to he Allies not to sit still waiting to be urged a genera United Nations offensive to thwart fapans new strategy which mos1 observers forecast would develop n an attack on Siberia at Russias ack Chinese headquarters announced the recapture of Linchwan Fu second biggest Japanese base in Kiangsi and said another Chinese force was attack 30 miles of Nanchang main enemy base in the Chinese troops were reported al so to have recaptured in and to have ad vanced within six miles of the im portant Chekiang base of Chuhsien 25 Treasury proposal that would per mit individuals to take an income tax credit of up to for pay ments on old life insurance premiums or for investment in government bonds awaited action by the Senate Finance Committee While declining to discuss de tails of the Chairman George DGa said the commit tee would dispose of it before tak ing up suggestions that the nev revenue bill be revised to provid for collection of income taxes on a current Another member said the Treas ury had proposed an allowance o up to 15 per cent of total incom for debt and insurance payment or for the purchase of govern ment This member pointedout how that the maximum sug gested by the Treasury would limi its benefitslargely to taxpayers in the lower He said tha an effort probably would be mad to increase the maximum credi debt deduction provision i this proposal promise relief for debtburdened taxpayer in the lowincome the com mittee was reported studying an other suggestion thatwould hav the effect of increasing taxe for most of the present 10 per cent credi for earned Turn to Page 9 REDS RAID HELSINKI 25 W Fortj Russian planes attacked Helsink and its environs last a Fin nish communique broadcast by th Helsinki radio said Earlier a Vichy radio report sai the raid caused the longest alarm of the yearin the Fliers Find Churohil Knbws Much About Aviation 25 United States fliers who piloted Prime Minister Winston Churchil and Averell Harriman on a mile trip to Moscow and through he middle east in an American liberator bomber today described the flight as very But they came back much im pressed by the prime and with his technica knowledge of William Van Der Kloot o chief sail it was purely a routine ex cept for our distinguished passen Copilot Jack Ruggles o San Francisco also said that then was nothing exciting about tin flight and that not a single enemy jlane was the fliers was on the flight deck about two third of the and often occupiec one of the pilots His technical knowledge abou aviation is really sail Van Der Members of the plane crew which included Flight Engineer R Williams of re lained vivid memories of the Rus sian night cap and robe Churchi wore when sleeping on nigh That colorful cap would hav made Josephs coat appear rathe one of the fliers remark The Liberator bomber which Va Der Kloot and Ruggles have pilote was the one which brought Lor and Lady Halifax back from Can ada just before the long Churchil flight For the trip to Russia the bomb er was fitted to resemble an air It was equipped with eigh berths An ice clothes hang ers and a builtin table were pro There were no cookln Meals in th air were either cold or served from thermos STILL QUIET ON DESERT 25 b British fighters and fighterbomb ers over the North African battl area were by the Britis headquartersRAF communique to On the the front still was quiet exceptfor artillery exchang es yesterday in the central secto and patrol clashes on the northern flank the night the bulletin Accused Of Violating Bishop Act 25 state budget to ay described as premature the ction of Auditor General Vernon Brown in setting wheels in mo on to penalize heads of four state encies on grounds they exceeded heir budgets in violation of the iishop That law provides the heads of gencies which overspend may be usted by the Brown Monday addressed a let er to Attorney General Herbert Rushton declaring that under the ct it becomes my duty to inform ou that the Liquor Control Com Civil Service Island State Park Com and the State Board of harmacy all exceeded their bud ets in the fiscal year ended June The auditor general conceded he ias not yet closed the books for hat fiscal but insisted any urther changes which might be made in the accounts of the four agencies probably would result in increasing their under the vould be the official to formally iresent the complaints to the gov who then would be obligee o order the responsible heads to how cause why they should not ie said he considered Browns report was I dont see how we can act be ore we have closed the books on he fiscal Nowicki anc t seems to me its about time the auditor general did close the books Were near the end of the second month of the new Thomas state civil service asserted Browns ookkeeping has been and that civil service actually has a cash balance instead of the deficit charged to it by the auditor Nowicki said the board of phar macy reported it was well in the lack instead of having the deficit Brown It would seem to me these dif ferences should be to show vho is before we go on under the Bishop Nowick Ralph chairman of the liquor Control said the deficit Brown charg ed to itgrew from the fact the egislature refused to appropriate money for handling the existing 2 per cent increase in liquor sales 3e and Brown noted that in addi the liquor commission receiv ed a refund of more than the amount of the deficit from distil to which it returned slow moving brands of but tha under the law the refund wa credited to the general fund and not to the Brown and Nowicki said th State Park Commission defici arose from the expense of clear ng debris from a windstorm whicl alew down thousands of trees on the island and created a fire haz Brown said the overdraft totaled Attorney General Rushton de clined to discuss the case until hi has studied all applicable Hi Glen said ther would have to be a showing of re fusal to abide by the Bishop law or wilful neglect of the duty to abide by it before an could be New Zealands Prime Minister Is in America The arrival of Prime Ministe Peter Fraser of New Zealand ir this country was announced toda by the White Presidential Secretary Stephe Early disclosed Fraser had reachec the American West Coast toda and would proceed at once t Washington to be received b President at whose in vitation he made the trip from th South Early offered no details on th specific of the journey no on the probable duration of th it con cerned United Nations strategy an problems in the war partic ularly as they relate to the Pacifl theater of There was nothing to be sal on the route Fraser travers ed or the means he used to get t this His visit was the latest of a Ion series which have brought heat of numerous United Nations th White House In recent months in eluding Prime Minister Winsto Churchill of Hurls Flying Fortresses and CarrierBased Planes at Strong Striking Force By THE ASSOCIATED PKESS 25 lie Navy announced today that he Japanese have counter at acked American forces holding he southeastern Solomon Islands and that a great sea and air bat e had developed in which the en my had suffered more than half dozen ships The battle began developing oa he afternoon of August 23 and al eady Army and Navy carrierr ased planes have effectively ombed two Japanese one one one and an unspecified num er of other cruisers which the Javy described only as The transport and one cruiser rere left burning fiercely after an aircraft attack on them north of Guadalcanal August The main action the tie Navy communiqufi s currently in progress and the Tavy said that it was a large cale battle between American sea and air forces and a strong Jap anese striking force which has ap roached the southeastern group f the Solomon Islands from a iortheast Army and Navy units backing up the American Marines in the Solomons had expected a violent attempt by the Japanese to recap ure their lost bases in the Tulagi and the Navy ap arently were fully prepared to meet Attack Being Met On this point the Navy said this counter attack has developed and is now being As the Navy related the devel oping battle action it said that ireliminary reports indicate that the enemy striking force has been attacked by United States Army Flying Fortresses and that our carrierbased naval aircraft1 are in A large Japanese the name of which was not was attacked by Army bombers which reported scoring four Turn to Page 9 ON ESPIONAGE Awaits Sentence Which May Cost Him His Life By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Her ert convicted rene rade American who chose to cast his lot with Nazi Germany as an espionage agent in his adopted awaited today a federal court sentence which may forfeit his whose stoical attitude dur ing six days of trial on a charge of conspiracy to commit espionage was broken only when a jury of six women and six men returned its verdict last will be sentenced September 2 by Federal Judge Wil liam He is liable to a maximum penalty of death or a prison term of up to 30 The former Buffalo athletes lips quivered and he dropped his head when his conviction was an His whom he left behind when he went to Germany more than three years ago as an exchange collapsed a short time then said she had doned her plans to divorce him mid would fight to win his From the moment I saw him in court all my love for him came back and now Ill fight my hardest for she Bahrs courtassigned Frederic announced he would appeal the He had asked the jury not to visit the sins of the apostates of that Ger man race on the head of this young Bahr will be 30 Bahr testified that he had ac cepted espionage training by the Nazi Gestapo only because t he wanted to come back to the Unit ed He said he delayed re vealing his intention to betray the Gestapo when he was questioned by authorities on the exchange ship Drottingholm because there were too many people around and he feared Assistant Attorney General Thorn Lord charged Bahr best showed his lack of good faith by having the nerve to come here and attempting to divert suspicion from himself by giving navy officers his engineering school thesis and telling them it was a valuable Ger man   

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