Adrian Daily Telegram, July 25, 1942

Adrian Daily Telegram

July 25, 1942

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Issue date: Saturday, July 25, 1942

Pages available: 10

Previous edition: Friday, July 24, 1942

Next edition: Monday, July 27, 1942

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All text in the Adrian Daily Telegram July 25, 1942, Page 1.

Adrian Daily Telegram (Newspaper) - July 25, 1942, Adrian, Michigan ADRIAN DAILY TELEGRAM Cool Weather Detain on fast Two JULY 1942 PRICE 3 Correspondents Report Harsh Treatment and Hongkong Food Shortage ONE WRITER WAS CHOKED LOURENCO Portu guese East July 23 Delay first diplomatic transfer of nationals between the United States and Japan since the start of the Pacific war was com pleted here today when more than North and South Americans boarded the Swedish liner Grips holm to take the places vacated by Japanese diplomats and their families brought from The Americans arrived here on the liners Conte Verde and Asama They walked down the gangplanks of the two ships as the Japanese left the Gripsholm and thetwo groups moved along the Quay in parallel lines to their new A line of railway cars had been drawn up on the separating the Japanese and Americans as they marched to their new Soon after to the Grips the Americans were permit ted to disembark and tour the The exchange was supervised by the Portuguese foreign Stories Brought Back The North and South Americans brought with them from Japan and Japanese occupied territories stories of their existence in the orient under Japanese Some of these accounts told of cold and Four Associated Press corres pondents arrived with the Following are portions of a com posite story on conditions in Japan and Japaneseoccupied territory written by the Some parts of the story are omitted 10 conform with official requests from Washington that nothing be done which could interfere in the slightest with the welfare or re patriation of Americans still in Japaneseoccupied The correspondents are Max chief of the former Associated Press bureau in Tokyo Relman who was in IndoChina Joseph Dy who was in and Vaughn who was in Hongkong at its Some of the returning American nationals reported that some pri soners were threatened with the guillotine by Japanese authorities seeking to obtain admissions of guilt from men charged with There were no known cases in Japan of physical abuse of women or children among the but some men were told their wives and children would be made to suffer if they did not confess to espionage These reports are those of In dividuals and have not yet been brought to the official attention of the United States There was a general food short age in Hongkong and Americans and Canadians held there suffered from pellagra and other ailments caused by diet Some lost as much as 60 pounds in weight and the average was 20 Suffer From Cold In the northern areas of the Jap anese internees suffered from cold during the Those held in Korea and Manchukuo en dured unheated cells and houses with temperatures below There were no reports of deaths among American prisoners from mistreatment but a number of British nationals committed suicide in A score of American cap tured in Hongkong on Christmas said they were marched to a ravine for then reprieved at tile last They were held in a garage for three tied in groups with insufficient water and The United Press received a dis patch from its correspondent Rob ert Bellaire telling how he and Jo seph Dynan of the Associated Press were beaten and choked by the Japanese when they refused to write certain Bel laires dispatch said in part Officials of the home office questioned me repeatedly and at great length in an effort to get me to admit that my activity as a Press Association reporter had in cluded illegal Since I had done nothing which I consid ered illegal I made no An official who was superin tending the questioning then de manded that I write a statement to the effect that I had been well This I refused to do until I had been badly The of ficer seized my pulled it constantly tighter and tighter un til it was impossible to I then was forced to write a state ment along lines he Dynan told me that he had much the same a home office official demanded that he write a statement on the The good treatment I received from the Japanese during war When he refused he was He was hit in the face and several in a were knocked out Paper Collections For Next Week Paper collections will be made next week in Adrian according to the following In case of the pickups will be delayed one AFRAID TO REGISTER BECAUSE THEIR MOTHER COUNTRY July 25 OP Four brothers accused of failure to re port for physical examinations un der the selective service law stood mute before District Judge Frank Picard when they were arraigned The court increased their bonds from to An attorney for the four who came to the United States from Italy ith their plead ed that they had feared to submit to their physical examinations be cause the United States is at war with their mother Mother country demanded Judge Whos been feed ing them for the last 12 years The men are Gino 31 29 End The four live with their Pietro Independent Agency Created in Action Approved by Congress CONFUSION IS PREDICTED July 25 presidential veto apparently was ready today for legislation under which the government would in some measure abandon petroleum as a base for synthetic rubber and use more farm The House yesterday passed a Senateapproved bill to create an independent agency with the au thority and the money to contract with manufacturers for an in creased supply of the vital product for both war and essential civilian This proposed revision of the rubber production program has been opposed by the administra current policy pe troleum is designated as the base for most of the synthetic produced under direction of the War Pro duction Board and the Rubber Re serve llth Hour Plea Despite an llthhour plea of Undersecretary of War Patterson that a new agency would create confusion in the program and di vert critical materials from airplanes and the House ap proved the bill by a vote of 104 to farm Woe voted solidly for the ChairmanFulmer DSC of the agriculture com said the people want this bill because the governments rub ber program has This group expected a presi dential and said ef forts would be made to override it should one be On the other Cochran DMo said that use of critical materials for grain rubber plants might deprive soldiers of needed while Clark D NC said the would toss us into a sea of Meantime Price Administrator Leon Henderson disclosed plans for further drastic curtailment in use of He already has elimin ated trucks delivering soft hard drinks and other non essential materials from the tire eligibility Applications for truck tires by eligible operators have outrun the Henderson We cant increase these quotas We are having to choose between vital operations and 10 Allies Drop Pounds of Explosives on Troops Near Port Moresby CARGO SHIPS WITHDRAW GENERAL MacARTHURS July 25 Allied divebomb ing has broken off the landing of Japanese supplies in the newly oc cupied BunaGona area of New Guinea and several fully loaded enemy vessels have withdrawn northward under naval a communique announced Douglas MaeArthurs head quarters said pounds of ex plosives and incendiaries were dropped yesterday on inva sion stores and installa tions in that region low on the northeast coast of the Papuan Large fires were started and an antiaircraft bat tery was A number of the enemys car go vessels have been unable to un being forced to withdraw to the north under cover of naval it Bombers Ineffective Eighteen Japanese bombers and a 16plane fighter escort were re to have struck ineffectively at the airdrome of Port advanced Allied base on New Guineas south coast 110 miles below There were no casualties and only slight it was The divebomber which is play ing a big part in Allied operations over New Guinea is the twinen gined Douglas first used by the Navy and then by the officers surrounded by grassy plains suitable for air con trols the only passable trail to Port Natural obstacles halt vehicles only 26 miles from Buna at the government station of Difficult Territory From the route is haz ardous even for foot A wire suspension bridge permits passage across the Kumusi 14 miles farther Just beyond the river is an almost per pendicular 800 feet Then come high U Army fliers first detected the sea movement of the Japan ese down the Papuan Peninsula from their older bases at Sala maua and Lae last Monday and three Japanese transports were listed among the invasion craft the Japanese are believed to have put several thous and men ashore and the Brisbane Courier Mail expressed disappoint ment in an editorial headed at tack must be our it must be felt on two scores first that Allied forces were not in a posi tion to take the initiative sec ond that the approaching convoy was not intercepted earlier and attacked M4S READY FOR BATTLE FRONT After a stiff test these allwelded M4 tanks built by Fisher Body at Detroit are lined up await ing their hardhitting 75 cannon pointing upward in a formidable Such tanks are rolling out of the new plant in trainload quanti ties only six months after ground was SAD OUTING July 25 M The death of his five year old son was the tragic penalty George Pfeifer paid for pulling a big fish from the Sangamon Pfief ers became extremely excited when his dad landed a big and slipped and fell back ward off a concrete abutment into the unable to watched helplessly as the boy State Social Welfare Squabble To Play Part in Political Race By JACK GUKEN July lican politicians profess pleasure because Governor Van Wagoner this week refused to reappoint Louis C Detroit Republic to the state social welfare com They are with a that Van Wagoner donated a fiery and capable campaigner to the cause of Secretary of State Harry Kelly in his contest for govern a campaigner who can work where it counts in populous Wayne a Republican but defin itely not an orthodox party and Clyde former Demo cratic were replaced by the Peter and Lawrence SecretaryTreasurer of County and Municipal Work ers Van Wagoners aides take the position the governor was entitled to gain control of the commission for the Democrats and that Miriani would have been on Kellys side Not Silent Any Longer To Miriams associates re ply that at least the hardhitting Detroiter would have been a silent supporter for while now he will be vocaL Various rural poli ticians already have had experience in how vocal Miriani can be when When John secre tary of the Michigan Welfare League which Miriani de scribed the incident yesterday as a kick in the teeth for the tax payers of and machine it sounded to some like Miriani hiTnsplf getting up it was said the Detroit er will not formally take the stump for but will talk publicly on welfare and tell a few truths which cant help but aid studying the Van WagonerMiriam scrap for its elec tionyear assert It may be important in the fight which VanWagoner and Kelly must stage for the Wayne county more Democratic than Republican in re cent May Weaken Detroit Support They recall that an of ficial of the Detroit Street Rail ways and Detroit Legal Aid Bu is a lieutenant of Mayor Ed ward that with the fact the Detroit city council asked for Mirianis they deduce the Governor cannot count on hearty support from the city Both in Wayne county and out forces which long have de sireda consolidation of relief and social security functions of trie commission made no secret of their hope Miriani would be He was the spearhead of their fight against the home rule welfare system supported by Melville McPhersons rural supervisors Van Wagoners previous action in naming Robert Kelso of the University of Michigan to make a study of necessary changes in wel fare laws is regarded by the wel fare league as an attempt to head off their displeasure at dropping members Several said they ordinarily would welcome such a step but regretted that it took place as a political campaign gets under They pointed out Kelsos report is not due for 60 to 90 which would place it squarely in the midst of the electioneering and make it almost inevitable that it gets tangled up In the governorship race Jn some Senate Action on Revenue Bill Not Expected Before Late August July 25 Jenator Taft ROhio forecast today that the Senate Finance Committee would strike from the Houseapproved tax bill a propos al to collect individual income tax es by installment deductions from the pay envelopes of the nations The Senator who has opposed this section of the new 000 tax said that while he had made no canvass of commit tee he believed a ma jority of members was inclined to vote against the proposal because of the steep increase it would bring in the collection of taxes from individuals in The projected collection which would go into effect January would forthe deduction by employers 5 per some of the periodic pay check of approx imately persons who work for The deductions also would ap ply to dividends and interest pay The individual ultimately would pay out no since the amount collected in advance would be credited against his reg ular income tax but dur ing 1943 his tax bill would add up to 24 per cent of his wages in the ordinary Taft said he thought a normal and surtax of 19 per cent was enough for this class of people to j but Randolph assistant said the Treasury wanted the advance collections because they would act as a fur ther brake against There was some indication that the Senate committee also might reverse House action on estate The present law exempts the first 6f life with a further specific exemption of for each regardless of whether any life insurance was Thus an estate could total without this special tax being At the the House abolished the life in surance provision and made the tax applicable to all estates to taling or a move the Treasury conceded resulted in the loss of in revenue At a committee hearing yester Senator Vandenberg R Mich asked Paul if the Treasury would object to retaining the pres ent law in order to get the addi tional Paul replied it preferred therevision to correct inequities but Vandenberg indi cated the question would be left open for committee Chairman George pre dicted that the Senate would not act on the revenue until late August or September and saidthat the committee ex pects a tough struggle be fore its version of the bill is PLACED UNDER ARREST IN CONSPIRACY CASE NEW July 25 Charged in a warrant with conspir ing to undermine the morale of Americas armed William editorpublisher of the New York has been placed under technical arrest at Clares The warrant was served yester day when federal who had searched for him since Thurs learned Griffin had been re admitted to Clares where he recently had been a for treatment for a heart William who visited Griffin at the hospital said the publisher was suffering from coronary At the offices of the a spokes man said Griffin had suffered from a heart ailment for several months and had been taken to the hospital Thursday ARMT SHOW OPENS July 25 U Armys war show opens a nineday stand here tonight Lum bering charging cavalry squadrons of jeeps and pioneer squads armed with flamethrowers went through a dress rehearsal for the first performance The only interlude came when 750 of the soldiers bivouaced here for the event slicked up to partake of a homecooked lunch served by housewives in homes ad jacent to their Todays Map Defiance Is increasing in uncon quered For a back ground map showing the main centers of resistance and under ground movements turn to page oftodays No Presidential Message Is Expected Congress July 25 House members prepared today to start informal President Roosevelt was reported to have reached the conclusion that he could take steps to curb inflation without additional legisla Members who declined to be quotedby name said they had re ceived word that there was little likelihood Roosevelt would send a message to Congress ask ing for additional authority to con trol rising costs they they could return to their homes or take a vacation for a few weeks since the calendarswere cleared of all busi ness andno important new pro posals were in It was that the Presi dent had after a careful that he had adequate au thority under powers as Com manderinchief in time of war and under authority of the price con trol and war powers acts to deal with any such situation as it might Congressional leaders earlier in the week had discussed the ques tion of legislation with the Presi dent and urged that ho message requesting congressional action be sent to Capitol Hill on the theory that it would encounter serious There was a tacit understanding in the House thatno officialbusi ness of consequence would be transacted for many or per haps When questions about the House program for next week were asked in the ichamber Speaker Rayburn ob served with a smile There is nothing in sightin the future on the Federal and State Conciliators Leave After Trying to Help in Strike July 25 and state conciliators said last night that Mayor Daniel Hack ett had spurned their offers to assist in averting a threatened citywide labor We were grossly said Robert state labor board The mayor wasnt even was the comment of Harry federal The War Labor Board was form ally notified yesterday that a labor holiday would result unless a strike of 116 city employees who walked out more than a week ago is set tled by midnight The striking city employees are affiliat ed with the American Federation of County and Municipal Iri versation with Mayor the Gray and Lomasney said Mayor Hackett told us that he did not want and did not need our assistance and that when and if he did he would call for We sug gested that surely he would not wantdefense plants closed and he asked what difference it would make since they were being closed all over the He said he was not going to have any arbitra tion or have anyone tell him how to run his The mediators left Jackson yes Mayor Hackett today called a meeting of the city commission to confer with Thomas chairman of the state labor on the municipal strike July ff The government has confiscated 29 German and Italian merchant ships and the Argentine Steamship Victoria in actions to supplementthe United States mer chant The Axis ships include Od a German vessel captured early in 1941 while sailing in the Caribbean under and 28 merchantmen by their crews while in ports in The maritime commis sion possession and use of the 29 some time ago but until yesterday title had not passed to In requisitioning the the Shipping Administration ex plained that this ship formerly flew the American flag but Had been transferred to Argentine registry an agreement providing for its return to United States in the event of war on the same terms that ships owned by United States citizens could be Essex to Slip Into Water at Newport News NEWPORT July the growing emphasis on air the Navy will launch the aircraft carrier built since the United States entered the the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company plant next Artemus Gates of Locust Long wife of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for will christen the the fourth ship in United States naval history to bear the The Essex will take to the James River with ceremony cut to a min imum by wartime Few persons other than the sponsors high ranking naval officers of the Fifth Naval District and shipyard will be An naval expansion program approved by Congress a month ago placed heavy emphasis on construction of aircraft car The measure provided for 000 more tons of fighting ships in cluding sufficient carriers to make the United States navy superior In this category to all other naval officials v Power Employees Strike july 25 Power service c6ritinued uninter rupted tbdaydespite a strike of about25employees of tiiecity pow and street department The members of the City and Workers Union walked outThursday to en force demands for a union contract that would provide per cent wage Some employees in both the power plant and the street remained at Strike Threatened July 25 MPJ An AFL electricians union contin ued today its threat to halt produc tion next Tuesday in the Tennessee Iron and Railroad Company and charged the with de priving us of our constitutional executive commit teeman for Broth erhood of Electrical said the NLRB has certified the elec trical departments of various other plants in the Birmingham but denied us that Operations Resumed GRAND July Associated Truck re sumed normal operations at its 20 terminals a 13day strike of 400 drivers and warehousemen affiliated with the AFL Teamsters Union being ended by an appeal of the War Labor WPA HOPES TO FIND JOBS FOR VETERANS July 25 XP The Works Projects Administra tion said today it expected to find jobs for of the veter ans of World War 1 who re cently became unemployed with closing of the Civilian Conser vation A WPA spokesman said that In the law creating Congress stipulated that veterans be given preference in The WPA does not expect find ing jobs for the veterans will be as Congress recently cut the agencys appropriation by twothirds arid WPA now is n the process of trimming Its rolls from to Nazis Cross Don After Bitter Fight Tanks At Rostov ARE LISIEO BY 41 Soldiers Killed So Far in Aleutian Action July 25 IP The Army issued today its first casualty list from the Alaskan announcing for local publi cation the names of 41 American soldiers killed the June 3 Jap anese raid on Dutch Harbor or subsequent air operations in the Aleutian There were six officers and 35 enlisted representing 18 With this the Army has announced the names of 931 soldiers were killed in action otj wounds in other areas since the war Officials said the list was included in the review of war casualties published earlier this week by the Office of War Infor which reported wounded and missing in action in all the United States armed forces since the start of the The names of those killed in Alaska were announced by the de partment on condition that publi cation be confined to newspaper and radio stations normally serv ing the areas in which the men No Michigan men were on the SAN July 25 who not been out side San Quentin prison in 20 years among 100 prisoners dispatched yesterday to fight brush and timber fires on the coast range hills west of The men will be paid 45 cents an hour under a plan worked out by the State Board of Prison Direct ors and the State Forestry Divi The plan was instituted to al leviate the shortage of trained civ ilian fire Officials said some lifers and longterm who cherished the privilege of working formed committees to help guard all convict knowing that any escapes might put an end to the The convict fire fighters joined between 200 and 300 men already fighting the Three guards accompanied the By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The navy disclosure yesterday of the sinking of a cargo vessel first announcement of a suc cessful Uboat attack in 48 hours raised to 397 the unofficial Asso ciated Press count of Allied and neutral merchant ship losses in the western Atlantic since Four including the died when their mediumsized mer chantman burst into flame after a torpedo struck it June S in the Car Thirtyseven others The Cuban navy announced the arrival In Cuba of 11 survivors of a mediumsized Norwegian torpedoed in the but i1 was not known whether the sink ing previously had been CONGRATULATES FBI BOSS July 25 President Roosevelt congratulated FBI Director Edgar Hoover to day on his 25 years with the justice departmentand said thathis serv ice to the nation had been con spicuous in in effective ness and One German Thrust Over Big Russian River Reported Frustrated See Map Page Three By EDDY GILMOKE July 25 forces screened by a heavy bomb ardment have established a hazard ous bridgehead across the lower 3on in the Tsimlyansk area and he invaders have wedged danger ously into Russian defenses at Ros 120 miles to the Soviet dispatches said Only skilled cour age and selfsacrifice by our troops will save Rostov from the fascist the military newspaper Red Star Dispatches indicated the Tsimly combat left the Don flowing red with the blood of the fallen twin engined Douglas bombers were flying wing to wing with Russian planes and were pounding at German tanks and mo torized One German thrust across the a natural defense lina before he lower was frustrated and the infantry regiment in the van was wiped a communique announced at Second Force Digs In Later said that n a second big supported by leavy small units reached the south shore and dug These were declared being dealt jut the situation indicated an om inous parallel to the original Ger man crossing of the upper Don at Counterattacks were declared to iave bettered the Red army posi tion in some sectors before Rostov and the citys approaches were re ported dotted with thousands of German but the numerically superior invaders occupied several new positions to the south to es tablish a fourway On one sector the Germans suc ceeded in breaking into the posi tions of our the Soviet in formation bureau In fierce battle which frequently developed in handtohand fighting our men annihilated over set fire to 18 German tanks and destroyed three selfpropelled guns and 14 machine A Nazi advance also was record ed in another section of the Rostov but this was declared to have been made only at a disproportion ate cost after all the defenders of these positions died the death of the fighting to the last drop of blood for their native The German high command de clared yesterday although moppingup operations Rostov had been The Vichy radio said blockdestroying explosions of delayed action bombs planted by the Russians were hin dering the Nazi Red Army men fought around the clock to check the grave threat to the a region of square miles almost as large as Oregon containing a wealth of timber and minerals coveted by Adolph Turn to Page RAF Torpedo Planes Attack Ship in Mediterranean July 25 RAF damaged more than 20 Axis air craft on the ground and shot down three others in air fights during attacks on the El Daba landing field yesterday in a continuation of the sustained air offensive against Field Marshal Erwin Rommels British headquarters said The ground fighting consisted mainly of artillery duels in the central and northern sectors with some patrol In the south ern sector there was nothing to In addition to the three Axis air craft shot down in air fights over El two others crashed in taking off to challenge the RAF RAF fighters ranged over the battle area in which British troops were consolidating newly won and successfully at tacked enemy Allied planes have been raiding El Daba day and night for several days in an effort to cut down the air support for Rommels Torpedocarrying aircraft of the RAF went across the Mediterrane an into the Ionian Sea to attack an enemy merchant ship The ship was ablaze at the end of the attack and was down at the the communique Informed military opinion in London was although the British retain the initiative in Af the arrival of a single Axis convoy could swing the balance to the other side at any ;

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