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   Adrian Daily Telegram (Newspaper) - July 6, 1942, Adrian, Michigan                                ADRIAN DAILY TELEGRAM Cooler oo Two JULY 1942 PRICE 3 GERMANED Mffi AXIS TROOPS TURNED BACK AT EL ALAMEIN Sea Army PlanesNow in Battle on All Worlds Fronts Except Russia service had MORE ATTACKS EXPECTED By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS July 6 air blows against Germany will de velop rapidly on a scale never be fore envisioned now that the Unit ed States air force has spread its wings over Naziheld military experts predicted The July Fourth opening of an American air front in they meant that at least half of the ground preparation to put the air force into active been They expected the modest be in which six American flown Boston bombers took part in a daring daylight sweep on Ger manheld to mushroom into a fullscale aerial onslaught The main factor in opening any new air front is the immense amount of work which must be done on the ground before even one plane can be put into the one expert Once this ground organization is set as the first flight by the Americans indicates that it ac tual operations can be expanded at an extremely rapid United States army planes now are fighting on all the worlds fronts except Russia and there are factors on the European front which favor it for swift develop ment over those in the Orient and Mediterranean The actual flying of planes to LIBYA Qattara Depression SIWA V r Oasis Pounded by heavy British Axis forces with drew toward the northwest from previous positions in the El Alamein 70 miles west of suffering considerable losses in men and equipment British headquarters British bombers and fighter planes destroyed 50 most of them troop in repeated raids 1 between Sic Barrani and Gambut 35 miles behind The Axis air base at El Dab the German was als England from America is a matter of rather than of and the transport of pilots is corres pondingly A large increase in the number of American pilots seen in London has occurred in the past Bostons were selected for the in itial hedgehopping carried out in cooperation with the because they are rated as excellent daylight being exception ally fast but they are not the most formidable at the United States air forces command There for the huge Liberator and Fortress with great loadbearing and Lieut Henry commanding general of the Unit ed States Army air prom ised on his recent trip here that their best and mightiest planes would be used by the Figures Cover Collectfon Period Up to June 30 The collection of scrap rubber in Lenawee county through June 30 amounted to ac cording to figures compiled by Karl collection chairman in the county for the petroleum indus On the basis of a county popu lation of as revealed by the sugar the rubber collec tion in the county averaged pounds per This figure compares with the Michigan as of June of June or pounds per capita and a national average of Thus Lenawee Hoch pointed out came through with more than twice as much rub ber per person as Michigan or the The national figures indicate that the rubber collection has been greatest in areas with large farm Ing for in showed a collection of pounds per person and Idaho pounds while New York state aver aged pounds per Hoch says that the filling station operators who have been collecting the rubber are confident that the continuation of the drive will bring in much additional rub Many farmers have been un able to collect all the waste rubber on their farms while those who have done so have turned hi rather astonishing On one for 123 pounds of rubber were found in discarded arc tics and old Traffic Bring Only Minor Injuries The 1942 Fourth of July week in Lenawee county was a great improvement over many of its predecessors in the matter of acci dental deaths with not a single fatality The usual minor accidents that result from holiday traffic were reported but they caused only a few minor injuries to persons in No deaths by drowning were reported and the notable scarcity of fireworks eliminated and chance of burns and injuries from this Last year the holiday week end also was without a fatality in the Sheriffs Adrian police and state police reported eight traffic mishaps for the long week Seven persons were none While traffic over the highways in the county was heavier than for the ordinary week it fell far short of last year and the year before in A selfimposed rationing of rubber on automo bile tires undoubtedly influenced many a Tiolidayminded family to celebrate near Most of the well lake resorts were but a July 6 President Wallace and Secretary Wickard were said authoritatively teday to have taken opposing sides in a Senate controversy over a measure directing full parity gov ernment loans to farmers of a bushel on 1942 wheat and 97 cents bushel on who preceded Wickard as Secretary of was described by friends as taking a vigorous stand against the which the Senate scheduled as its unfinished business On the other sponsors said they were informed that Wickard approved the Passage of the bill had been projected as a possible solution of a quarrel over the farm appropria tions bill that has left the Depart ment of Agriculture without funds since July Turn to Paee 2 larger percentage of the resorters were from this Two cars were badly damaged and two persons received minor cuts and bruises in an accident which occurred at Cranes Corn ers at 7 oclock this Leo Herman of who was at tempting to make a left turn from Treat road east on collid ed with the car driven by Franklin 23 years of who was driving west on Sher iffs officers investigated the case and said that Herman had Turn to Page 7 12 3 3 INJURED AS SHIP HITS CABIN CRUISER July 6 XP The Great Lakes James Watt and a 42foot cabin cruiser collided at today on the St Clair drowning three persons and injuring three Twelve persons were rescued by boats from the nearby All of the casualties were aboard the The cause of the accident was not immediately The dead Irene High land whose body was recov Barbara and Jacque line daughters of and George of St Clair Their bodies still are The owner of the Thomas of is confined to St hospital at Mt Clem Also in the hospital is his wife and Helen moth er of the missing girlsThe extent of their injuries have not been de The collision near the southeast bend of the St Clair River near Clays The big freighter was Survivors said the two Bagley daughters were trapped Inside the cabin and that efforts by their Violent Death Takes Holiday By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Violent death took its lowes holiday in years over the twoda Fourth of July week with onl 320 lives reported lost as agains a 628 total for the threeday cele bration of the Fourth last Gasoline rationing on the popu lous eastern war plam operating everywhere over the hoi day and fireworks restrictions com bined to lessen accidental death Of the total deaths reported i a nationwide Associated Press sur i59 resulted from traffic ace 83 from drowning and 7 from miscellaneous Not single fireworks casualty was re The list by states Alabama Arizona Arkansa California Colorado Con necticut Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois In diana Iowa Kansas Ken tucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Mich igan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Mon tana Nebraska Nevada none New Hampshire New Jersey 8 New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota none Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South DakotE Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Wash ington West Virginia Wiscon in Wyoming District o Columbia father to gain entrance into it State police stationed at St Clair Shores said that the rescue party saved these persons C of his wife and their son and and 2 James of Highland Park Burton of Highland Park Dorothy of Royal Oak Frank of Berkley George of St Clair and three injured S15HOG BACK July 6 hog returned to the livestock mar ket today for the first time in 16 With offerings and demand for pork and lard press buyers paid a hundred pounds for choice equalling the high of July A year ago the top was years ago 1L50 and two Southern Locals Leave the July 6 Mass withdrawal of southern lo cals of District United Mine Workers of in pro test against the policies of UMW President John Lewis was an nounced last night by Regional Di rictor Bernard Borah of District who at the same time announC ed his own and those of five of the regional organizers Approximately 30 locals in the upper south district with a mem ership of more than will before affiliated with the Congress of Industrial Organizations hrough the National Council of Gas and Chemical 3orah who has been in charge of North and South Carolina and he could speak for a majority of the locals In his Borah charg ed that Lewis was attempting to wreck the labor and hat his policies interfere with Jie countrys war Regional organizers who resign ed were Judd of L Smith of Coope of Daneburg of and and Martin formerly of now in the EDUCATOR DEAD July 6 Ruby former dean of women at the University Western On tario died here Saturday after a fouryear Mason was graduated from the universities of Toronto and Chi cago and received her at the University of In 1928 she did educational research in Europe for the dominion government She served as dean of women at the University of Indiana and the Uni versity of Illinois before joining the staff of the University of Western LEGISLATION VETOED July 6 President Roosevelt vetoed today legislation which would have granted overtime pay to certain classes of War and Navy Depart ment workers and deprived of citi zenship any persons making false statementsin connection with gov ernment With reference to the latter pro Roosevelt said in a mes sage to the House Under this if citi zenship may be lost as the result of a The extreme na ture of this sanction not only con stitutes a bad but does violence to our democratic con cepts of fair and reasonable pun ishment for a particular Gillette Wants Separate Sup ply Agency Sst Up July 6 Early Senate action to increas domestic production of syntheti rubber through use of alcohol from surplus farm products appeare likely today as an agriculture sub committee called for testimon from War Production Chief Donal Senator Gillette serve notice he intended to ask immedi ate consideration of a bill to creat a separate rubber supply agency with specific directions emphasiz ing the agricultural alcohol pro chairman of the sub which has heard wit ness criticize federal rubber of ficiais for relying chiefly on petro leum sources for synthetic rubber declared returns from the nation wide scrap rubber collection dem onstrated what he termed the acut need for development of all possi ble Full returns were not bu Secretary of the Interior Ickes re ported last Tuesday that onlj were in the first the which has been extended to Estimates of the amount o scrap rubber which might be re covered ranged from tons made by government to the ton estimate of i New York rubber Gilletti It appears doubtful now tha even the minimum figure will be he Joining with the lowan in asking speedy Minority Leader Me Nary said there probably would be an opportunity to con sider the rubber supply agency bil in the Senate this Both Majority Leader Barkley and McNary indicated a desire to defer action until Nel sons testimony could be weighed Arthur rubber co ordinator for also was slated o appear before the Gillette com mittee Newhall reported yesterday that the synthetic rubber which envisions an nual production of tons by the end of might cost con siderably less than the which Congress has Gillette said testimony to date indicated the agricultural process was quicker and cheaper than but he emphasized that corn elt senators had no thought oJ driving the petroleum industry from the We just want to enlist all sources of supply as quickly as we Gillette Senator Norris who also advocates production of syn hetic rubber from surplus said the unexpectedly low scrap collection total makes more im ressive the idea that we must re sort to all practicable means to et material for Representative Coffee D has placed in the Congres ional Record a communication in which Henry master if the Washington State said development of the grain 3d had been held up by the War reduction Boards refusal to grant priorities on needed materials to groups willing to start production with their own WORKERS QUIT July 6 hun red and fifteen employees in four municipal departments walked off heir jobs today in what Walter representing American ederation of County and Municipal called a rotest against unfair treatment of ity workers rather than a full fledged Departments affected are public water distribution and Water service was not VFL engineers continuing on their obs at pumping station Hawkes said water service will not e impaired at present Seventeen supervisory employees the affected departments re mained at Administrative staff members in the water dls ributing remained on the ob to take emergency and eneral operation of Sharp Park including the golf Invaders Reported to Hav Established Bridgehead Across Don River EXPECT PUSH AT ROSTO By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS July German have thrown more than troops into the Kursk offensive i a massive wheeling operation t overrun the approaches to the Cau a military informant de clared Heini Guderians secon tank group was said to be leadin the and the Ger mans were reported as having firstline aircraft deployed to e ploit any major German The enemy already has reporte establishing a bridgehead across th The present battle is being fough on a 120mile front from east o Orel to east of Military experts predicted that German would create a major diversi6n o the northeast shore of the Blac employing Nazi troops froir the Kerch This driv probably would be aimed direct at gateway to the oi By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS July de fending fighting wave afte wave of Nazi tanks and infantry o fields strewn with dead and wound sought desperately today t stem an offensive aimed at the im portant Don River and the strategi city of Voronezh on the Moscow Rostov The German high comman claimed that Axis spearheads strik ng out from the KurskKharko line already had reached the Do on a broad If the claim i the Germans are perilousl close to the MoscowRostov ral road which for 50 miles sout of Voronezh runs about 10 mile east of the The bloody struggle which ha developed into a fullscale Naz offensive is taking place in a roug triangle with Kursk and Kharko n the west and Voronezh in th east as its The fierces lighting is in progress around th cities of Belgorod and Volchans in the Kharkov Russian dispatches told of stub born fighting around these twi cities and said the Germans hai succeeded in driving a wedge int heir linesin the Belgorod sector but the said the Ger nanssuff heavy Jossesunder lusstan flank Farther southeast o the Germans were attack ng furiously and incessantly with force estimated at more than men by the Soviet high The Russians reporter hese attacks had been repelled mt the Germans apparently were hrowing every available reserv nto the bitter struggle to smasl eastward to the Germans Exhausted Signs of exhaustion among thi erman troops fighting at Bel gorod and Volchansk were appar Soviet dispatches Man if these troops had been brough tastily from the rear of othe it was These re lorts told of one division of motor zed infantry which lost deai uring an attack on a narrow front wo days While last nights Soviet com muniqu6 indicated that the German mslaught had been slowed up near it emphasized the bitter ness of battle and indicated it was ontinuing in full The fight ng southeast of Kursk was in its ninth day with the Germans re rarted using five four tank and two motorized divisions With this mobile the ighting moved swiftly from one oint to another and Russian bat lefront dispatches reported that a ussian counterattack had re aptured four inhabited points in he Kursk The Red army was reported to e holding strongly on the German ight near Kursk in an effort to lock any attempted junction o liese Axis forces with the German rmies striving to push northeast ward from Belgorod and Vol the apparent objective f the Nazi is about 130 miles ast of It is the capital of oronezh province and has a popu ation of about While the Russians reported no gnificant changes in other Jerlin claimed that German planes and submarines sank nine ships and amaged 10 others of a Russia ound convoy in Artie SHOOTS NEIGHBOR WHITE July 6 Eleanor a 28year Id was held in the Neway o county jail today after admit ng to Sheriff Robert Hart that le turned a shotgun on Arthur a Grant township neigh because he refused to pay a 0cent debt to her Hart said that Cole was not In ritical but that he had uffered flesh The sheriff said Sage had ild him she fired on Cole when he efused to keep an agreement to ay her son 20 cents for driving his ows Sage said that after re using to pay the Cole follow d the youngster home and pursued he argument with Hart re She admits she shot ut insists she did not mean She aid she wanted to scare Hart said Sage would be charged with felonious German Military Circles Admit British Have Taken The Offensive In Egypt OC7f Rain Hamper Operations Against Japanese in Aleutian July 6 Wellequipped but handicapped b fog and Army and Navy air forces are carrying the fight to th enemy in the Aleutian Making the first announcemen concerning the Aleutian war zon in two the Navy in a week end communique declared the com bined air forces had severely dam aged Japanese air and shor but added that th situation in the chain of island stretching from Alaska toward Ja pan has not changed materially The on June announce that the Japanese had set up m nor temporary structures at Kiska 585 miles west of the United State Navy base at Dutch an that Army bombers had scored hit on an enemy cruiser and sunk In the latest the Navy re ported American fliers had mad an attack on three Japanese trans ports and their Shortly after the Navy made ii the War Depart ment released a statement by Brig adler General Laurence Kute who said that Army and Navy ai orces operating under unified com mand were keeping the Japanes on Kiska island under observatio and patrolling adjacent one of the youngest gen erals in the brought Washington the first per sonal report of conditions in th remote Pacific area which th Japanese invaded at the time the naval and air onslaught on Mic way west of wa repulsed a month American airmen are devisin special means to put the Japanes within range of fighter planes op erating from the Aleutian Distances are an bad weather increases gasolin when ever the weather even approache our bombers take off Despite the latest reports from he Army and Navy there were re newed expressions of concern abou the Aleutian Delegate Anthony Dimond o Alaska said the reports show heyre working at the situation pink for fear were going t dawdle until the Japs take ove he whole Aleutian He expressed particular concern over saying the Navys com aps Face New Problems at End of Fifth Year of Conflict By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS July 6 ng Chinese ground resistance and he rising might of the United itates air force slowed down the and confronted them with lew problems today at the end o the fifth year of the ChineseJap nese conflict In the the Japanese struck a lew note of caution with night ombardment of Hunan ommunications after two aylight raiding forces had been cattered by the American Volun eer Group in a spectacular windup f its When the American fliers leir fighters down those of he Flying Tigers elected to emain in China joined the new 23rd United States Air Force Pur uit In the course of their farewell the AVG fighters acted s escorts for a United States lombing squadron which attacked apanese airdromes at Nanchang nd Hankow in its first offensive ction since arriving in All the bombers returned safely o their basesafter dropping their oads of explosives in the target On the the Chinese struck ack against the Japanese captors f in Kiangsi province 80 niles south of and re ook the town after the enemy had eld it but 24 the Central Tews Agency The fierce counter attack was said to have undermined Japanese fforts to trap large Chinese forces n central south of the hekiangKiangsi railroad where he enemy appeared still unable to ridge a last 25milewlde gap be veen their Turn to Page 2 TO FACE TRIAL July 6 CXP ight alleged Nazi cap ured after being landed from Axjs bmarines on Long Island and in are now being held in the istrict jail under heavy guard to ce trial Wednesday morning by special military The Federal Bureau of Investiga which announced the arrest of e and other official sources ould not that the eight ere here but it was learned that ey were in custody of bert provost marshal for e district Major General Frank McCoy ill preside at the munique disclosed that the en emy was digging in at that spot t which the Japanese pushed after i initial landing at American naval operations in th North he are threa ened if the Japanese succeed in e tablishing a big base for land air craft on We ought to take back and d velop Dimond could be made into the spearhea of an attack against W ought to throw in at least 50 planes immediately and bomb th hell out of THREE MORE SHIPS United Neutra Losses Rise to 340 in Western Atlantic By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Three newly reported ship sink ings in the western Atlantic coupled with 20 reported last week put at 340 today the unofficial tabu lation by the Associated Press o united and neutral nations mer chant ship losses in that area sine Pearl A large American merchantman loaded with survivors of two othe torpedoed craft was reported yes terday to have gone down befor submarine attacks off the coast o South while a smalle American vessel was reported sun off the northern coast of the Do minican Nineteen survivors of a third shi a United Nations merchantmar torpedoed in the western were landed yesterday at an east ern Canadian port sai an undetermined number of their mates had been Casualties of the other two nev sinkings were 18 lost of 110 aboar the big and eight miss ing of 22 aboard the smaller crafi At least 273 seamen and passen gers were lost in recent submarin attacks reported last sinkings announcec during the week of June1 4 11 were two British three one Norwegian one one Brazilian anc one Seven of these went down off thi east bringing the war total for that section to 143 eigh were sunk in the Caribbean for a total of 109 three more in the Gul of Mexico made that war figure Z and two off South America brough that total to No sinkings were reported last week in Canadian leaving that total at REPORTS NELSON 1OING ABROAD NEW July 6 STew York Times says that Donald director of the War Pro duction will go to Britain next month to confer with Oliver British minister of pro on the coordination AngloAmerican war The main purpose of Nelson the Times will be to acquire a personal knowledge o Sritains production machinery and to continue the conversations which were started last month dur ing Lytteltons visit to this country The paper says that the visit was set for August to give Nelson an opportunity to reorganize the War reduction Board machinery in th Jnited States and to give the AngloAmerican combined re ources andp lanning which was established during Lytteltons a chance to start BULLETINS MEXICO July 6 ens of the United States will find t difficult to purchase anything eyond the essentials of living by he end of this Claude United States Secretary f said in an address repared for delivery late today to he second InterAmerican Agri ulture I know that the people of other imerican nations are making sac and we In the United States re making Wickard told elegates from almost all the 21 American July 6 ewly established United States air orce in China was reported today have sunk a Japanese gunboat in ic Yangtze River during the imericans destructive opening at acks upon Japanese airfields and bases in Unofficial press re orts reachingChungking said the merican bombers destroyed more 25 Japanese planes at Han ow and Canton airdromes The first communique to be 1s ned by the new United States 23rd Pnrsnit Squadron said Hankow was raided July Nanchang July 2 and Canton on July July 6 avy announced today that United tales submarines had sunk three apanese destroyers in the Aleutian slands July 4 and had left a fourth erfroyer burning ARIOFIHENILE IN Rommels ForcesCompelled to Yield Further Ground South of El Alamein July 6 A Berlin dispatch to the Basel National Zeitung quot ed German military circles today as admitting that the British had succeeded in bringing up enough reserves to take the offensive in the battle of By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS July 6 The British army of the growing steadily in strength and kept the pressure on Marshal Erwia Rommels Axis forces today after compelling them to yield further ground south of El Alamein over the week Military quarters said the new Axis withdrawal was purely local in but it was hoped here that by maintaining the initiative the British might keep Rommel off balance and thwart his at tempts to regroup his forces for a fresh allout Ii was the feeling that the outlook in Egypt has improv ed greatly during the past few Partly responsible for this mounting optimism were dispatch es from the indicating that the Axis weary from their swift 350mile push across the des were beginning to suffer from lack of adequate supplies of food and water as a result of the heavy pounding of their extended com munication lines by Allied RAF pilots returning from Dombing missions told yesterday low they had spotted one huge concentration of Axis supply trucks west of El Alamein and plastered it with high We undoubtedly destroyed hundreds of trucks and hundreds more were put out of commission ybomb one pilot Nazi Airdromes Raided British bombers also were re ported to have hammered the erman airdrome and supply dumps at El 35 miles west of El starting huge fires which were visible 50 miles The fliers said terrific explosions touched off by the bombing indi cated that an ammunition depot had been Dispatches from Turkey said here were unconfirmed reports ia Ankara that the Germans were moving mechanized equipment down through the Balkansto sea lorts near apparently with he intention of shipping it across the Mediterranean to replace loss es in North Observers that sufficient equipment could reach Rommel in time to prove a actor in the showdown struggle now shaping up some 70 miles west if Alexandria A communique from General Sir Claude Auchinlecks head quarters yesterday said that Rom mels armored strength had been urther dented by British counter attacks which compelled Axis me chanized units to retire from a ridge south of El The same bulletin reported that nine Axis planes were shot down in dogfights over the lines Satur ay and that five more were de troyed Saturday night during ucis raids on Alexandria and the auez Canal The Germans and Italians said heir planes had laid mines in the Suez effectively bombed miitary targets in that area and estroyed aircraft over he North African Four een more British planes were shot own over the Italian high ommand Axis accounts acknowledged lat British resistance had stif ened but beyond re porting the repulses of British ounterattacks gave no details on the situation in Egypt Alexandria remained with le native populace showing no sign of unrest bars and res aurants continued to do a rushing usiness and the two English daily ewspapers devoted almost as much space to cricket matches as o the Ranks Established For Navys Nursed July 6 OB anks of Navy nurses ranging rom ensign to lieutenant com established today by bill which President Roosevelt gned into The Navy Nurses estab shed in never had a legally rescribed relative The new aw will bestow upon nurse super ntendents the relative rank ol eutenarit Assistant not one r each 300 corps will ive lieutenants ranksChief nurs j become junior and ordinary   

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