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Berkshire Eagle: Monday, January 9, 1956 - Page 1

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   Berkshire Eagle (Newspaper) - January 9, 1956, Pittsfield, Massachusetts                                CAPITOL BOOMLET Kennedy of Massachusetts Beinfi Talked I p as Veep Michelson 14 Volume 212   T J' 'J 1 Ketauver j Seeks Advice on Second Term Is Proposed HANOVER, X.H. r Stevenson said today not enter Adiai he will WASHINGTON (AP) President Eisenhower, avowedly feeling pretty chipper, New Hampshue's jb t m indefinite on his iuture plans, got back to work at the White House today after al.nn nr Pslnrntlal U? Tcleohoto ICEBOUXD XIAGARA a weird appearance frozen spraj- contorted into Ian- tactic Extreme cold of llie last few days turning the tumbling into ercat ice This the American Falls, in background, from below- Prospect Point. Severest Sleet Storm in Years Closes Many Berkshire Schools By EDWARD J. FARRELL Around the clock efforts by state and city highway department employes spared j Pittsfield and the county residents from the wrath of the severest sleet storm in several j seasons. Highway crewmen traveled back and forth across greasy highways all night j long- to push back the snow and sand the freezing rain. j Side Streets Worse State Auditor is Croniii On Contracts the county. The Mohawk Trail Consequently, the county from one to mo inches, while primary Match 13 In a letter 10 Pi of. Herbert W Hill, the 1932 Democratic piesidential candidate .-.Aid hp is entering the Mai eh 20 Min- nesota primary and "to enter both would mean that I could not do in either what I think ought to be done to make a primary election really mean- ingful." Stevenson's decision appar- ently cleared the for an uncontested repeat victory here by Sen. Kefauver (D- who won the 1952 Demo- cratic primary and who will the state this weekend to besin his campaign for the 1936 contest. 4Piggy-Back' Row Put Up ToNLRB 'a four-month layoff induced by his heart aitack last September. I this morning to find all main ar- teries open and safe for travel. However, the conditions on side streets and roads bore graphic evi- dence of what the situation would have been except for the highway- men. four inches covered Jacobs' Lad- der. Mr. Dadiey said the tempera- ture at the top of Trail at one point degrees while at the same time the temperature at the Five Roads North Adams was 14 degrees. the Mohawk registered 32 LLl -'Vitll JT.V4dt J- -1 UOl 3. Vntually all schools in Berkshire Soa ine Justice Mmton delivered the! I County vvith the exception of Pitts- j J unanimous decision, holding the BOSTON" (UP) Secretary of [field, Dalton and Lanesboro. were The trouble is due to end complaint against the State Edward J. Cronin was "crit- forced to cancel classes for today, this afternoon when the tempera- union was under exclusive juris- WASHINGTON' Supreme Court decided today a Massachu- Eeonomic Report Discussed Theie weie no spec.al callers to- day but Pi ess Secretary James C. Hagerty said the President was in- volved in "a lot of staff work." Arthur Burns, the President's', economic chief, stopped in to dis-, cuss the forthcoming economic re-! port to be made b> the President. Eisenhower told a news con- ference in Florida before leaving yesterday that he was ready to assume "the full duties ol the presidency." In discussing whether he may( run for a second term, Eisenhower said: Mind Could Be Changed "My mind at this moment is not fixed. If it were, I would say so right here this second. But mv j rnind is not fixed to such an extent that it can't be changed." That lemark that hi? mind still can be changed seemed to indicate pretty clearly that Eisenhower has reached a tentative decision wheth- er to run in the light of his Sept. 24 heart attack. He was careful not to say so specifically, but most Washington setts state court lacked power to (reporters at the conference in Key ban efforts by a truck drivers' got the impression he had ion to reduce "piggy-back" hauling of truck trailers on railroad flat cars. icized today for negotiating pri- Shck streets made travel impos- sible. tures throughout the county take vate contracts to furnish One death was attributed lo sharP For to- storm. John T. Hulland. 60. veter-! morrow- the weather bureau has chusetts vital statistics to the fed- eral government. an Dalton police officer, collapsed The criticism came in an annual and died of a heart attack while on cruiser duty during the storm. The freak winter storm started in Northern Berkshire yesterday audit report by State Auditor Thomas J. Buckley. predicted readings in the 50s. Despite treacherous highway con- ditions, local police had only one accident. At 7 this morning Mary- ann L. Barnaby of 99 Plunkett St., Buckley said the federal govern-; afternoon in the form of a heavy skidded while driving on Lincoln diction of the National Labor Re- lations Board. The Massachusetts court, on re- quest of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, issued an injunction against Local 25 of the International Brother hoods of decided tentatively 'against running. An informal poll showed them feeling 11-3 that he will not. Vitality Improved The President came to Key West Dec. 28 on the advice of his doc- tors, who said he ought to get more sun and outdoor exercise before tackling the full of his 60 P.C. of Polled Experts Say Ike Fit for New Term WASHINGTON 246 heart specialists giving definite answers in a poll on President Eisenhower's health, three out of five say he is physically fit to seek a second term. The others say he is not. Results of the poll were published today under copy- right by U.S. News and World Report, a news magazine. The poll was conducted for the magazine by the research organization of Benson-Benson Princeton, N.J. ,The American Medical Assn. last Friday had questioned the propriety of the poll and urged doctors not to answer. Questionnaires were sent to the 444 doctors certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine as heart special- ists. Of this number, 275, or about 62 per cent, replied. Twenty-nine of these did not give direct answers. The two questions asked and the replies, as given by the magazine: "Based on what you have read about the nature of the President's illness, and assuming a normal convalescence in the next few months, do you think Mr. Eisenhower can be regarded as physically able to serve a second Yes: 141, or 60.3 per cent; No: 93, or 39.7 per cent. "Do think a man who has suffered a heart attack can be regarded as physically able to serve a term as presi- Yes: 152, or 64.4 per cent; No: 84, or 35.6 per cent. my most trusted advisers" before1 making up his mind. He has not done that as yet to any extent, he said, and his advisers have not wanetd to bcther him about it. He was asked who some of those fice again-a burden which- Eisen- hower said yesterday is the most wearing he ever has experienced. Slightly tanned and wearing a were and whether he al- id talked with some of Teamsters, prohibiting the local j gray suit, Eisenhower stood be- from inducing workmen not to a table in the bachelor offi- hver or load trailers at New jeers' quarters at the naval base Haven's No. 5 yard in Boston. ment has paid S34.339 from Janu-'snoxv storm. The- storm moved j Street. She told police she was .NO. D yarn in and gave this report on his condi- aiv. 19-59, to June 30.1955, for "pur-Uouthward and changed to hail' try Ing to avoid a stuck car. Her j May Seek'Any Remedy" of all the doctor tells me of this contract..." Bucklcyjsleer and finally a freezing around. mj The local appealed to the highest "alls myvftal capacity is of to stnke the very much improved. I don't know ti .-n-i -i T-rrt iar? tVi n f 1 13 i tt______- T n said the sum never was paid overjover the entire to the state treasury and "has yet been entirely accounted for." Uncooperative' Up to 4 Inches of Snow field skiddeandramme into tta Barnaby car. No one was injured. From one to four inches of snowl public Works tion. It argued the federal meaning of the term, so there's management relations ace use asking me about it. Cronin could not be reached inland sleet fell before the was on the scene of an-'itjes mediately for comment. Buckley came. Pittsfield Public accident. Mrs. Elizabeth said he had been "completely Commissioner Morris E. Lundberg j Watt, dental hygienist. of 4 Pine- and refused to fur-'abandoned plowme when the snow hurst Ave.._slipped and fell at the 3 nish records of the vita! s contract with the federal ment. Buckley said in his report he had criticized the prac peatedly and that Cronin from state courts authority to issue; a Oan against peaceful activ- involving employes of inter- state motor The high court said the National Board has authority to "But 1 feel get about." Readv for Plain Talk much much more able to them. The President said he He wanted to bother ifte." mention two Press Secretary James C. Hagerty and his brother, Dr. Milton Eisenhower. "But." he added. "I was talking about bringing this talk about a second term right up to the fore- front now and talk about it objec- tively and intensively. We havent' done that. Apparently they haven't Jordan Regime Replaced After New Pact Rioting From UP and AP JERUSALEM Israeli Sector Jordan radio today re- Tax Exemption For Gasoline Urged in Plan WASHINGTON (UP) President Eisenhower today submitted to Congress a nine-point farm pro- gram featuring a billion-d o 11 a r 'Soil Bank" plan designed to take .5 million acres of cropland out of production during the next three years using certificates for surplus crops as subsidy payments. The President also urged Con- gress to place a "dollar limit" on the size of price support loans to individual farmers and farming units. The limit, he said, should be sufficiently high to protect family-size farms which operate efficiently. He further proposed mat gasoline used on farms be exempt from federal tax. He estimated that half the gasoline farmers buy is for tractors and other farm equipment. In a word special message to the House and Senate, Mr. Eis- jenhower said "no problem before the Congress demands more ur- gent attention" than the plight of the nation's farmers. Depression in Prosperity "They find their prices and in- comes depressed amid the nation's greatest he said. He said the government must move "swiftly" to provide remed- ies, particularly for the key prob- lem of piled up surpluses which are hanging- over farm markets and holding down prices. First item in his nine-point pro- gram was the soil bank plan, which consisted of two different methods of cutting farm production: 1. An "acreage reserve pro- gram." Mr. Eisenhower said this program would be aimed at achiev- ing a "voluntary reduction" of as much as 20 per cent in the acreage already allotted to farmers for such major surplus crops as wheat and cotton. In return for cutting f t i their acreage (including plowing ported the formation of a new government in not-torn under spring wheat already plant- Jordan where a weekend of anti-Western demonstrations ed) farmers would receive certi- a t.1- i i- J-T i ificates which would be "equal to After talking briefly of the Americans fleeing to the Israeli sector of Jerusalem. perceniage of the value of the crop" they would normally have said "acts ot sabotage" had been; harvested from the land. These El Rifa. Premier with a legal opinion on Dec. ;he surface and gave the sand j fractured hip. 1 relations." He" reolied he thousht there S, 1949. advising him to handle the sau solution a chance to go to' Probably the happiest man in Minton comTieiued ihe high, would be very little value in dis-j gt became Premier and The new government, the out by 'Subversive foreign since Communist-led noting broke in (Ara-o) Jerusalem and out against the Baghdad Pact a' month ago, was headed by Sanur Rifa. certificates would be redeemed by the government either in cash or in surplus commodities from the Foreign correspondents arriving'government's own hoard. ,n Jordan. Jerusalem, were refus- Mr. Eisenhower did not put a funds through the state treasurer rather than as an individual. ork on the city, depending on how you look at Adm. Byrd Flies 3rd Time Over Pole There w ere several traffic tie-ups it, is the bartender of a Pittsfield 'during the night. Jacob's Ladderjnitery. He called Pittsfield police closed to both east and west-iat this morning to say he court feit Congress never had any Bussing that matter because "all of intention of taking from NLRB its j the considerations that apply to jurisdiction over things are complicated." otherwise within its He said the matter requires j bound traffic for about three hours, couldn't get home and was goingfsoleiy because the railroad is the j much study, and that ''naturally I MC MUPJDO SOUND ArvarrticaYame Adm. Richaid E. Byrd' has made his f.rst fiisr'nt of the? current antarctic expedition ovei- the Souih Pole and the unexplored sceii0 of heartland aiea of the Circle. H was iThe horde of tractor-trailei-s spend the night in the barroom, [complaining party." I started thundering into Massachu-j (setts at 8 last night when the truck-; ling curfew was lifted, ran 1 trouble on the winding Route 20 j trail. Scores of the highway heavy-1 weights sprawled across both lanes j of traffic when they jackknifed on! the sliopery surface. The jam be-i "The ol1 comPanie5 a-e crews Both lanes" of traffic thumbing their noses at the people finally opened at am. !o( Massachusetts." declared Slate Ma.toon Hill on South Street was Rep. Wallace B Crawford of Pitts- another bottleneck will want to confer with some of Oil Firms 'Thumbing Noses' at Mass., Rep. Crawford Says, Calling for Probe Minister of Interior in the new cabinet list presented to 20-year- old King Hussein who gave his approval. Ibrahim "Hashim. the premier of the IS-day-old caretaker govern- ment which resigned Saturday, was named Vice Premier and Minis- ter of State. Sala El-Madaha was installed as and Justice. It was announced from Amman j as fresh demonstrations were re-i led curfew permits by Jordanian dollar price tag on this program. the vrtejan f.eld th.s morning as he filed an Antarctic Cars and tiucks alike found The order for -.an investi- srade with its skating rink o{ Tne recent increase in explorer's too much. oH made the halfway mark on the The order calls for a joint Senale- th.id fliKiu over ecosrapn.c found tne ,urface ,0 shck Jheinnouse committee shall make pole. But pievioiis appioaehes staged sliding back with thorough probe of the situation been fiom of Ar.tau-tica fou-- locked This report back by March 1. rlosest lo if. laihcr ;han over thc ladled about an hour until a cityj -Really iess accessible appio.v.rnaie center sanding truck manaced tf> creep' immediate cause of P.ep. Craw- of the continent. 'hrough the stalled vehicles to the _ ford's being, in words, "really The rapped a top. i disgusted was Friday's announce- husy davs for t.ie airn of Onp of st0rm% jment by Esso Standard of a three- Operation Deepfreere. In a'l. its tenths-of-a-cent increase in the Navy fliers have flown :he Albert E Dadiey. stare hichway pncc of Xo. 2 fuel oil, the tjpe used Keocraphic po> twice and once engineer directing the state's 97- for hornc heating, over the macnctic pole. 'ruck fleet, said last night's storm! cla'm." he said, "tim this one of the worst he could re-iis onjy -he second raise this sea- rail. He had a crew of 102 men it actually is the third." In the antarctic quadrant facinc throughout the night. i jn confirmation of this charge of Australia they 'nave scon about a Commissioner Lundberg said hs fauitv oil-company arithmetic, million square 750.000 had every available piece of equip- Crawford pointed to Friday's an- of them never before been seen ment and about every man in the nouncement. which included men- by mar. according 10 an esnma'e highway department on du'yj of a half-cent increase Xov. 22. hy Cmdr. Gordon Kb'oo. air opera- throughout the nisjhi. Highwa: i ar.d to an announcement of tions director have Suponntcndcnt PeTo Gilhgan and Aug. 11 of a three-tenths-of-a-cent ered two mountain ranges and his Otto Ncilson v New in Square M.Iei designated by the p e s i d e n t thereof: five members of the House of Repiesentatives. to be designated bv the sneaker there- of, is hereby'authorized and di- recied to make an immediate ported in Nablus. 40 miles north j Foreign Office said today a "cer- of and 50 north, tain amount of Communist activ- nw CliV O. investigation of the increase in tank-wagon price of fuel oil. ef- fected by the oil companies doing business in the commonwealth. committee "shall, in mak- inz, its invest.sdtion inquire es- pecially into the effects such in- crease in price will have upon the consumer: whether such in- crease :s to be re.'lec'cd in the price pa.ci b> and whether sa d increase in justified under piesent economic con- d.tions. Conld Call (or Sa.d commifce shall be pro- vided quarters in the State House 01 elsewhere, mav hold der from the i heavily armed s across the Jewish sector authorities who said they could un- But he said the "real cost" to dertake no responsibility to safe- the taxpayers would be "subslan- guard the newsmen's lives. tially less than the apparent cost" Jordanian authorities notified of the certificates given to farm- ers, since the program actually will be "financed with commodities already owned and paid for by the government." Billion for Conservation 2. The "conservation .reserve." Under this program, farmers would be asked to "contract voluntarily with the government to shift into forage, trees and water storage" croplands which are now in need of conservation measures. "Any vvould be eligible to par- in this program regardless tourist and airline offices to dis- continue traffic to Jordan "during the present situation." British Foreign Office Sees Red Financing LOXDOX (UPl Tne British spokesman and, could be' be- Thc spokesman said the reports Legation Attack 1 Indicated "a certain amount, of I The new wvernment was formed money has been .spent in Jordan a: the height of the Arab Commune and o.hor .ou.ce, .greatest crisis. Since Saturdav. mobs have roamed the streets of Amman. Jordan Jerusalem Mr. Eisenhower said. "I would [hope that some 25 million acres 1 would be brought into the conserva- tion reserve." He left it. up to Congress to work out the details of the pay. but proposed that about 350 VBK, S5U t Saudi Arabian i The United States made a vigov lous protest, to Jordan's charge d'affaires in Washington concern- ling Saturday's riots. Secretary' t State Dulles summoned the official.' plateaus as hch ss 13.000 fcft Forecast Cl.5. Wralhtr Riirfan) rrTTSFIKUV-U.nciv and warm- er with pos- to heavv at "imps tomorrow. ion'fht abiivc frpcrmj; Hic'n Kcp. W. B. 'iCnllij (ii: Crawford Other Incnl trrnthrr tinia trill I'. Jritind on I, Ssct'on 2. for duiy at T and were, on'at noon today Mr. Lund-. GavStmtJon Owner presents one of the least. hers: paid tribute to his men this! A veteran of the gas-station expensive delivery problems. "We n-.-irmns: for "wonderful job" ness arid cuirentiy owner of Craw- arc he said, "one of The areas ofj ivv did !o "ovpii-OTse ford's Station at 154 First highest profit in ihe counny And- in the loads open. Si the state representative went what they re to us is some- ?A: on Thp sid" on to say rha: "this wmicr they ;hmg shot'd rp complied hy didn't even so aown the usual one oa-A- afteinoiin in the he'cent on It has been a cus- ;om thai as fupi oil went up. gaso- The for sn .n- The had a full crpw of fiO.iincwcn: down" as fiied this ir.orn.ng, men with regular plows, two It Crawford's contention that follows: i l.iadrrs and six graders going all Massachusetts is not only one of the Ordered, that a yunt special n.cht lone. users of fuel oil in the na-1 committee, to consist of thrpp i The snowfall in all parts uon. but because of us density of. members Senate, to be ripped down an American flag dur Orrtrr publ.c hearing, mav travel with- jTaysir A. Tou.an. to his home in! srs -a1 summon witnesses and to require the pioduction of books, records, and papers and the giving of testimony under oath, and may- expend for expert technical, legal, clerical and services and expenses, such sums as may be aporopriated therefor Said commiitee shall report to the General Court the result-s of i's investigation and its rerom- if any. loacther w-.rii of legislation necessary to cany its recommendations into effect, by fil.ng the same with the ricrk of III Wins Pact Works ;n Jerusalem program: Surplus Disposal: Recommended a change in the law to permit sale of government-owned surplus prod- ucts on the domestic market at lower prices than are now possible. THREE RIVERS. Present law requires a minimum International Union of Electrical price of 105 per cent of the support plus carrying charges. Mr. the minimum reduced to the support carrying charges, an hour general wase boos! He also asked for relaxation of n-ps.nres....... workers in higher classifica- export laws which limit exports of nro.'ect can a Prcs-isurplus fanri products to "friendly pro.eci American disclosed. nations hint that effort-? may be made to sell or trade some farm surpluses to Iron Curtain countries Mr. Eisenhower announced that e ETTS T. 'lives and property i Jordan loiked like s battlefield with armed 'troops moving through the silen; 1, 1956. Police Nab Train SAVAGE. Minn. (UP> IncompTe-e repii: ualty toll after !h lence in Amman and the HOUSP of Repre- salcrn as at least two and 20 Tlie driver 01 the csr on or before March turned o! i -is save thp cas- down a speeding tra.n Sun- Secretar> of Aencu.tur ree davs of vio- dav to prevent it from smashing; Benson is appointnc md Jordan Jem- in'o a car stalled on the tracks, "surplus disposal admin said he e On-.a- A Jordan radio broadcast today ha Railroad thinking it was a road. administrator" to Farm Continued on Second NEWSPAPER! 1   

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