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Berkshire Eagle Newspaper Archive: January 6, 1956 - Page 1

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Location: Pittsfield, Massachusetts

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   Berkshire Eagle (Newspaper) - January 6, 1956, Pittsfield, Massachusetts                                BERKSHIRE LTOPIA Bernard Del'oto's Pattern Fits Pittsfield Hell 11 City Edition Entered as second class matter, Pott Oiliet, Pitttjitld, Mats. Volume 210 Pitts-field, Massachusetts, Friday. January 6. 1956. 24 Cento Faure Loses Bid for Wide Coalition Mollet Savs 2 Groups Would j Form Regime PARIS The outlook for for-, mation of a new French govern-' merit became gloomier today with; a Republican Front alliance re-i buff to o% enures by Premier Ed-( zar Faure for a wide center coali-, uon. j The recently formed Republican Front is led by former Premier! Pierre Mender- France, who heads one of the Radtcsl Socialists, and Socialist leader Guy Mollet. Mollet announced ;ae rejection of Faure's bid after a meeting He element1; of the Republican Front) will stick together and form a gov-j ernment on their own if they get the chance. Hold 160 The Republican Front controls) some 160 seats and Faure's group-1 ing about ISO. Faure suggested that the nextj government be formed by a coalition of center parties because) of the ed in .Monday's election by the! Communists and antitax support-j ers of Pierre Poujade. Together.1 the two center factions' 340 or so seats would be a sizable majority in the 955-seat Assembly. j Mollet said such a move was impossible because of difference? between the Republican Front and] Faure's supporters. Faure Radical Socialist like Mendes-i France but they have fought each] other bitterly and the party hasj ided behind them. Peipins; Bars m T Tl Time Limit Newsman Claims a reril i Rene newly- Cote May Call Assembly A'oic PARIS President Coty may call elected National Assembly in'o emergency session to deal with the urgent facing the na- tion. informed sources said today The assembly is rot scheduled ;o meet until Jan. 19. but Coty was reported to have discussed the possibilities of an earlier session with Ernile B. Lamont, assembly permanent secretary-general. The French constitution calls for an assembly to convene the third Thursday after election but legal experts said there vvas room for a "wider interpretation" of the article. AT GRAIVDPA'.S FEET oi-ra-iun of 80tU birthday reception for German Chanrellor Konrad Ade- nauer, left. >es.terda> in Bonn. va  a new ap- peal for support of a proposed state constitutional change to- day amid a flurry of new at- tacks "from religious leaders against the plan to use public funds for private education. The new statements came as Virginia headed into the final weekend of intensive campaign- mi on the proposal to issue tuition grants for attendance at private schools as a means of avoiding compulsory integra- tion. Virginians will vote Monday to determine WASHINGTON (UP) The whether a con- United States is demanding that; 'Times'Man Says Rights Violated He Invokes 1st Despite Warning By Sen. Easlland WASHINGTON' York Times copy editor Robert Shelton JMrs. Epson Dick, national co-chair- today refused to tell Sensfte inves- Holyoke Man Stevenson's State Leader j HOLYOKE. Mass, Sen. 'Maurice Donahue, 36-year-old Air! 'Force veteran of World War n.! today was appointed chairman of '.the Massachusetts Stevenson for, President Committee. i 1 Telegram From Chicago j Donahue, dft assistant floor lead-) er for the Senate Democrats, said !he received a telegram from Chi- cago signed by Barry Bingham and tigators whether is a Commu- nist. He accused them of threaten- jmen of the committee, appointing j him as Bay State chairman. Donahue was graduated fromj; freedom of the press and in- Holy Cross CoJege in 1939. He wasj emocratic a delegate to the Democratic na-j tiona! convention in 1952 and voted Reads Long Statement there for the former Illinois gov- ernor. stitunonal convention shall be Russia pay 5725.000 for destroying a U. S. Navy plane last June. I Administration officials said ai diplomatic note billing the Russians held. in a statement being broadcast over 15- radio sta- tions during the day, said "not a single leading educator" has claimed the proposal would de- stroy the public school system. But new opposition came from religious groups. The Hampton Roads Rabbinical Assn 28 Southwestern Diocese Episcopal ministers, 4T Lynch- burs; ministers and the Harri- sonburi Ministerial Assn. an- nounced stands against the tuition grant plan, t AMA Blasts Poll Of Heart Doctors On Ike's Runnin? State Democrats Still Split; Sir Anthony and Lady Clarissa Eden are shown here, lie appar- ently oblhious to political and she stint become center of arilifh stjle LONDON (UP) Anthony Eden, v.-ho became Brit- Iain's Prime Minister in a blaze of glory only nine months -j i J for approximately thai amount will! ago, is in very serious trouble today. be delivered to the Soviet embassy today. The Navy Neptune plane, with 11 crewmen aboard, was attacked by Soviet jet fighters June 22 over the Bering Sea between Alaska and Siberia. Hidden Party j British politicians said the polish-1 f Ifgt ed diplomat chosen by Winston Churchill to head the Conserva-! tive government has become the j center of a storm that may en- Thfbig plane was forced down, danScr his rmure" in names after being fired on by Eden is unaer fire not only from the Soviets No American lives'the opposition Labontes but I were lost. But seven of the Headgear 'Unflattering' LONDON London fashion The of recent Conserva- expert denounced the mistress of from Burma Seizes Peace Flags For Mme. Sun RANGOON, Burma ffi Police seized peace dove flags from members of the audience at a state reception for Madame Sun Yat-sen today and arrested a num- ber of persons who carried them. The banners appeared over the large crowd at the Rangoon City Hall despite a ban on display of Communist emblems. Burma's government for years has been combatting Red insurgent armies in the interior. Peace Pact With U.S. Madame Sun, widow of the foun- der of the Chinese Republic and sister of Madame Chiang Kai-shek is ar. official of the Chinese Com- munist government. She is here on an 18-day good will visit at the invitation of the Burmese govern- ment. Replying to a welcoming speech by Premier U Nu, Madame Sun said Far Eastern questions mus be settled by international confer ences and that there is a need for 'a collective peace pact for the Shelton, who said he has been a copy editor for one and one-half years and previously served as a copy reader, did not invoke the fifth amendment when counsel J. G. Sourwine of the Senate Inter- nal Security subcommittee asked if he is a Communist. Instead, Shelton read a long statement which said he is a loyal American but added: "This sub- committee is nudging the end of my copy pencil, it is peeking over my shoulder as I work." "This subcommittee is engender- .ng the fear that soon it will be looking into news rooms all ovar the he said. In refusing to state whether he a Communist, Shelton invoked the first amendment, which guar- antees press freedom, and chal- lenged the authority of the sub- committee to question him. Challenged by N.Y. Group Subcommittee chairman James O. Eastland ID-Miss) overruled Shelton's objections and ordered him to answer under the threat of a contempt of Congress citation. Shelton still refused. Shelton appeared before the sub- committee after Sen. Thomas C. Hennings Jr. (D-Mo) objected that the subcommittee serves no useful purpose in "embarrassing" witnes- ses like New York Times reporter Clayton Knowles. who testified Wednesday that he was a Com- whole of the Asian and Pacific j munist on another newspaper from i ,.nj mmal SDOnsors Ol leceni v t WIIUIK ui uic JNavy airmen were mjuied, some' Qn ,he Pnme Xo 10 Downin? St. today for would naturally in- 'seriously. Minister have kept discreetly in being able to make up her the United States." Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Jhp background, but rumor identi-, about, hats. CHICAGO ijPt The Journal of the American Medical Assn. today1 urged the nation's heart specialists j to ignore a questionnaire asking j their opinion on President Eisen-i bower's physical ability to serve Carr Quits, Bloc Names Flynn BOSTON By a Staff Correspondent Committee still Molotov was in San Francisco at the time of the incident and ex- pressed regret that it occurred. He said Russia would pay half the damages but denied that Soviet fies them as powerful figures in singling out pretty Lady the including some 34-year-old the Prime Min-i leading members of the stylist Eileen Asheroft, writ- Informed sources said the con- :no. in the Evening Standard, said: servative campaign against Edenj "Some of her hats are too old. two chairmen, representing- two hostile factions within planes caused the incident. He also :s mainly as a are too young, some too fussy j insisted the U. S. plane was overjto him it probably too Soviet waters. _ jblow over before long without, pro-i stylist Asheroft said she couldn't. The bill prepared today was ;njducing a permanent split in the rernember Lady Eden, former deb-j Clarissa Spencer-Churchill., aring a hat before she! handsome Sir Anthony inj 'the men were injured. Cronin Won't Settle Tussle factions wsth- ir. the Democratic State Com- mittee appeared at the State regarded physically able to serve'claimed they had an attendance of House this morning to file office 3-" members, which constitutes a nf their "organization 72 Negroes Cleared in Row Over Bus Seats oy spr.nl. (1952. The Prime Minister has been as- _ ..gut __ she has become a second term. two cnairmen. represenung- two uustue wmim {0 Molotov's offer. It They add. however, that The Journal said the question-' committee after alleged meetings last night of the "Demo-; not submitted before because will be revived if Bearing a 'hat before she naire was mailed by the American icials had to determine to produce a firm, consent Research Foundation. Princeton. clallc t-ommiuee. N.J.. to all 400 hear; sides Claim Quorum listed in the Directory ot Meaica. Specialists. One faction elected ilham H Burke Jr. of Hatfield, the other Z Questions Asked Maurice R. Flynn Jr. of Maiden. The following two questions Burke group met "upstairs" asked: 'in the Hotel Sheraton Plaza. The 1 Do vou think a man who group met "downstairs" in suffered" a heart attack can be1'he same hotel. The Burke group a term as 2. Based on what >ou have read o: a the T4-member state the Flynn group convalescence in the nrv few -nore" members, months do you th-.nk Mr. Fiyr.n was plectra chairman a..- hower can be regarded as pin si- er John C. Orr of Mediord, who cally able to serve a second term? has been aciins a-; chairman since: The medical magazine said no 1932. announced that would re- hint was given as to how the in- fuse to serve. An was formation is to be used It added: .made in the summer of 1954 to "This type of questionnaire, make FKnn state commi'tee chair- whatever the source, should be man hy Robert F. Murphv of Mal- cotiraged. and. to prevent the Democratic gubernatorial can- tena V.at such infirmation could at the time, but i: was frus-; the questionna re should t rated by a majority of ih" cnmmit- be into the 'ec wh.ch to retain Carr. In Princeton. Lawrence Benson. Berkshire Vote Divided presiden- of the Re- search Foundation, said the Berkshire County member'; o. tne was beins conducted for a state committee acam were at odds ent whom he declined to name, in the two candidates. Gerald t He said he had not scrn the edi-. Doyle Pittsfield attended the lor.al and did not wish to corn- Burke "upstairs" mertmc and _ j men; on r. reports of their "organization meeting" with Sec State Edward J. Cronin. as re- quired by law. The faction headed by Maur- ice Flynn of Maiden sent its secretary. Mrs. Helene Sulli- van, who filed the Flynn re- port at 9'30 a m.. On her way OIH. she ran into Mrs. Ida Lyons, secretary of the Burke cioup. who was about to file for the Burke "organization." Flynn told newsmen it was up to Secretary Cronin to de- termine which group he will as the official state C'Xv.iv.ittee, but Cionin didn't "We're not a judicial office." he said, "it's up to them to settle it between themselves." sailed by Conservative newspapers of -he Prime Minister i for "dithering" in the Middle has a dozen different] "bungling" on terror-ridden Almost without exception; rus. and failure to curb Britain's have been unflattering." j I mounting inflation. Ex-Fashion Writer j He'5 Reported Yielding Qf Eden wdl give in to a ston Churchill, is elegant, slim, shy i partv demand for a a oneume writer for a fashion' debate on British __ British edition of of Xesro basketba11 fans arms sales to the _ and her hats are as var- nin -e- '.acquitted today of charses of dis- informed sources said today. ,ed as a politician's piomiscs. [Labor NEW ORLEANS Commons a style Neic Racing Group In East Brookfield Ask 45-Day Meet BOSTON Brook- field Racing Assn. Inc. today sought a permit for 45 days of harness racing on a proposed new track in East Brookfield. A charter of incorporation was issued Thursday to the new company- and it promptly ap- plied for a permit to hold races from Auc. 13 to Oct. 3. The new track will be built just off the Worcester Turnpike. John F. Coleman of Stough- ton is president and treasurer. If Dress Fits NOTTINGHAM. England 193T to 1939. The subcommittee's right to con- duct the investigation was chal- lenged by the New York Civil Liberties Union today. In a state- ment released in New York, the civil liberties group said the in- quiry "corrupts the atmosphere of free opinion" and contended that Congress "has no power to sum- mon citizens before it at will to make them answer for their views or connections." Hopes- To Adjourn Today Eastland said Knowles crave val- uable information by disclosing I that he was a member of a com- munist cell on the Long Island Pres5 in Jamaica, N. Y., from 1937 to 1939. Eastland said that so far as the subcommittee knows, all persons named by Knowles left the Long Island Press years ago. Eastland also said his Senate Internal Security subcommittee hoped to end its current series of i hearings in an all-day session to- rsr" zzs; sr rt- [witnesses included employes of the t-i i "HaUv VPW.S and New and found them innocent. t Eisenhower. _ Lady Eden has made no .epiv. Fannv Carver. 17-year-old Dil-! Labor Leader Hugh P I and the'dress from a shop to replace one, A arustlshe stole earlier that veSrv students. Thursday series of talks with lt ,he "Clarissa jiutee fined the o9-sear-oldlwitm and found them innocent. .Eisenhower. Fannv Carver. 17-year-old Dil-J Labor Leader Hugh lard coed also was freed of charg- called earlier th-.s WCCK .or a de- es that she inc.ted a riot when the bate in Commons be.ore Eden Nesroes boarded a bus and renKn- sails on Jan. re.iised a. Negroes boarded   incident occurred Wednes- The mounting belief Eden would the growing criticisms In Salurclav's Eagle _ Ideas Unlimited anrn-ncemen- After making the major points in his inaugural message place the sipvstemmed A p e (hc curioslty of many pltts. w-ith jeers field votcrs tossmc the hopper propos- i white bus driver said he ordered ithe [but was teat-calls. dal on Jan. 17 or IS. Tax Forecast fl.S. Vealher Bureau) PITTSFIELD cloudy 'ontsht ;n the Tomorrow continued w-.nciy and rr-lder Temperatures fa'.lmc bv afternoon, hicn near Further outlook: Geneial'.y fair weather and much colder Sun- day. ._ for Burke, while Mrs. Kat N. Fanning of P'.ttsfield was for Flvnn at the Last activity was a 'oi- to two recent Supreme Court -icnsions on cojrt actions which Burke and Cair have hern fil-.ng against each other for past Tr thp first dcc'.--.'tn. roar" ;hc wpsp't the duly consti- this because a Colombia Censors W7i i> i j u Democrat Who Backed Herter On Roads Draws Line for '56 i WCTS Of Opposition als ranemg from a city asphalt plant to remodeling Central Junior High School as a nursing home. In Every Sat- rrday" column. Rocer B. Linscott inspects some of these secondary straws m City Hall's new BOSTON iUP'-A Senate Demo- cou'.d be financed from the present, a- who votod m favor of last tax. Kerter m mid-term BOGOTA. Colombia "bond Vssue says he.sage and vxsil qo a'.nr.s Gov. Hener non dollars and a one-cent tax oppo.suion, ux 1S DOOM" !newspapers, three of which also' iha-nrsan. in the j Million Umit 'swere ordered to pay heavy fines; tnf court rule t..a. i.rp.e, j vVnrrpstpr Democrat said he or huge sums in "back taxes." small-town office-holder with an unusual complaint-too "manv Warren A.- 'Casey> Turner of Lee. who re- centlv resismed as head selectman to pursue duties S-v.h'District representative at the State House. Though Mr. Turner's explanation for the move sounds reasonable, some Lee cit.zens don't think it's the whole story. Their view-son ation are reported by that cla.m to the chairmansiil; Wtll.am D Fleming of Wor- would support no more than 30 mil- The manaeement of the news-. Five-Day Forecast avcracc well below normal, possibly S to U) below normal. Precipi- tation w ill he liglT aid ocrur- inc mosiiv Hurries at the beginning and end of Water con-ent than inch. Other local ufather data will found om Pagm 1, Section 2. decided to send a delegation of 80. ,n the Senate las: jear. .mean a 1 err, fie increase in the t each to half a bai- Flemm- fiscal in- present lax, Flemme said. ,hf conserva Hot There will be 52 alternate dele-, formed him that only SO million rin my opmion this u something faction of the governing conferva, (gates to the convention. nartv. ious of the has found time to read and F. Kennedy, whose cam- Berkshire in Like political pack. Mr. <--aPe- of ar-hies of Americans who put principle above EDITORIAL PAGE {dollars in new highway borrowing 'our people cannot party. New York Daily News and York Daily Mirror tended to show that the investigation was not con- fined to one newspaper. Eastland agreed and said, "No newspaper is immune." William A. Price, reporter for .the New York Daily News, defied JEastland's repeated threats of a 'contempt of Congress citation on j Thursday and refused to say Whether he is a Communist. He did not invoke the Fifth Amend- ment but challenged the subcom- mittee's right to question his "po- litical and religious beliefs." News Fires Reporter Tne Daily News oromptly fired iPr.ce. Executive Editor Richard Clarke in a telegram to the 'newsman "your conduct as a wit- ,ness before the Senate Internal I Security subcommittee. has de- "stroxed" your usefulness to the New s." i Oito Albrrtson. a New York printer and proofreader, in- voked the Fifth Amendment when asked if he was a Communist or (knew any co-workers as Commu- nists. Free-lance writer Richard O. Boyer refused to say whether he a Communist now. or ever was one Dan Mahoney. rewri'e man on ]the New York Daily Mirror, said the is not a Communist now. He i refused to say whether ha was a party member in the past but (swore he had never performed .'treason, sabotage or iWSPAPERI   

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