Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

North Adams Transcript Newspaper Archive: October 16, 1978 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: North Adams Transcript

Location: North Adams, Massachusetts

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   North Adams Transcript (Newspaper) - October 16, 1978, North Adams, Massachusetts                                 NORTH ADAMS  ADAMS  WILLIAMSTOWN MASSACHUSETTS  I36THYEAR—No.34  MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1978  32 PAGES —20 CENTS  Polish Cardinal, 58, elected new Pontiff  VATICAN CITY (AP) - The cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church Monday elected 58year-old Polish Cardinal Karol Wojtyla as pope. He is the first non-Italian in 450 years to be named pontiff of the 700-million-member church.  He took the name John Paul, the same as his predecessor.  Wojtyla, archbishop of Krakow, is the 163rd successor to the Throne of St. Peter.  The new pope, born in Wadowice, Poland, on May 18,1920, was elevated to cardinal by Pope Paul VI eleven years ago and is a member of several Vatican congregations — Sacraments and Divine Worship, Clergy and Catholic Education.  He was born the son of a chemical factory worker, and has a good working relationship with the Communist government of Poland.  The last non-Italian pontiff was Dutchman Adrian VI, who reigned in 1522-23.  Inflation bite to offset any income tax cuts  WASHINGTON {AP) - Legislation on the way to President Carter will cut income taxes for 65 million couples and individuals next year. But for most, it won't offset a higher overall tax bite from inflation and increased Social Security Withholding.  A four-member family earning $20,000, for example, will get a $167 income tax cut under the $18.7 billion measure Congress passed Sunday. But the effects of inflation pushing people into higher brackets combined with Social Security tax increases which begin Jan. 1 will cost that family $235 — or $68 more than the tax cut.  (See related story, p. 2)  Thé Senate passed the bill 72-3 and the House 337-38.  Although there was no immediate word from Carter whether he will sign it, the compromise bill appears to meet most of the objections he voiced against earlier versions.  It would cut individual income taxes in 1979 by about $12.7 billion, reduce business taxes by $3.6 billion, " and give investors a big break by cutting the capital-gains tax by a net $2.1 billion. Miscellaneous reductions would cost the treasury another $150 million.  "With what we had to work with (the budget allowance for tax cuts) we spread the joy around about as well as we could," Sen. Russell B. Long, D-La., told the Senate.  Not everyone was happy with the bill, especially Republicans and some conservative Democrats who were iq)set because conferees had dumped a provision granting $164.5 billion in new tax cuts from 1980 through 1983 if - federal spending is held down.  "We are sitting on our hands while middle-income Americans are facing a real tax increase" because of inflation and the Social Security hikes, said Sen. William V. Roth, R-Del.  The individual tax cuts would be reflected in reduced payroll income tax withholding starting Jan. 1.  These include across-the-board reductions in rates; increasing the $750-per-person exemption to $1,000; raising the standard deductions from $2,200 to $2,400 for single persons and from $3,200 and $3,400 for couples, and expanding the earned-income credit for poor working families, to a maximum of $500.  On the other hand, the general individual credit — $35 per person or $180 per family in most cases — and the deduction allowed for state and local gasoline taxes would be repealed.  And, for the first time, some unemployment compensation would be subject to taxation. An estimated 900,000 persons who wind up with annual incomes above $20,000, if single, or about $25,000 for a couple would find a portion of their unemployment benefits taxed.  All told, between 1 million and 2 million couples and individuals would face slight tax increases under the bill.  Generally only those single persons with incomes around $18,000 and families under about $20,000 would get enough tax cut to offset inflation and Social Security increases.  Because of the structure of the tax package, some persons in the $40,000 income range would come closer to breaking even than would some at much lower levels. The bill includes a liberalized.  once-in-a-lifetime tax break for persons over 55 who sell the home in which they have lived for three of the last five years and don't buy another costing at least as much. The first $100,000 of profit from the sale would be tax exempt.  FROSTY MORN—It was a frosty morning chanted look provided foliage tourists  atop Mt. Greylock Sunday as sub- with excellent photographic op-  freezing temperatures brought portunities, since many mountain tops  widespread frosting conditions to the stayed white until mid-afternoon,  tops of the region's high ridges. The en- (Transcript-Noyes)  2 new businesses locate in Beaver Mill  By PETER G.GOSSELIN Transcript Staff  NORTH ADAMS - Two new businesses, with total employment of 25 and with prospects for up to 60 workers, are moving into the Beaver Mill this week, according to a joint press release from the region's two major development organizations.  The two n^w firms, a sportswear manufacturer and a textile machine repair business, have already located heavy equipment in the mill structure, according to the joint release from the Economic Development Corp. of Northern Berkshire (EDO  and the Northern Berkshire Industrial Development Commission (IDC).  The manufacturing concern, headed by Mr. and Mrs. Shinichi Miyazaki of New York City, will employ 17 to 20 workers Immediately to sew high-quality down-filled coats and sportswear, the release said.  The New York couple is renting 13,000 square-feet of space for their firm, according to Gordon C. Lane, IDC executive director.  Mr. Lane said the new firm is an expansion of the couple's current business, which includes a retail  store in New York City, Muzen Unlimited Inc. He said the new company does not yet have a name.  The textile machine repair business, Soller Machinery Co., is also re-locating from New York City, according to today's joint press release.  The release said the firm, headed by Sol Lerner of West Hawley, manufactures, rebuilds and repairs textile and apparel machinery.  Mr. Lane said the firm has rented 5,000 square-feet of space in the Beaver Mill and has already moved equipment into the mill.  The IDC director said both companies should begin regular operations in the near future. He said-startup is awaiting necessary modifications of the mill building, including installation of new power distribution equipment at the location.  Mr. Miyazaki is a native of Tokyo, Japan, and moved to this country two years ago. He said long-range plans for his firm include the relocation of its entire manufacturing operation to the city and possible expansion into hand-made furniture production.  See Businesses, p. 16  Expenses included liquor, cruises  Massport fetes under King cost $92,000  BOSTON (AP) - Politicians, members of the news media and employees of the Massachusetts Port Authority enjoyed open bars, buffets and bands on harbor cruises sponsored by the agency during Edward J. King's tenure as director.  In the last three years of King's leadership, Massport, an autonomous public agency, spent more than $92,000 on food, liquor and boat rentals for nighttime Boston Harbor cruises scheduled from May through September.  King, the Democratic nominee for governor, was Massport director from 1963 until his ouster by the agency's board of directors in late 1974.  Records examined by The Associated Press show that in addition to cruises, Massport arranged for the catering of news conferences, dedications, an employee clambake and meetings of the board of directors.  Catering bills show the agency spent $38,580 on food and liquor at a  series of receptions during a five-day period in June 1974 to celebrate the opening of the Volpe International Terminal.  One reception, which included dinner and hors d'oeuvres for 950 people, cost Massport $19,262. Another for 900 people, cost $8,710, including $1,125 for shrimp, $500 for roast beef and $1,550 for drinks.  The caterer. Sellers of Melrose, billed Massport $7,932 for a third reception for 800 people. The menu included $1,000 worth of shrimp and  $500 worth of beef.  Catering bills also indicate that Massport, under King's leadership, routinely ordered food for 100 people for the monthly meeting of the sevenmember board of directors, but a reporter who went to several of the meetings remembered fewer than 50' people were in attendance even when controversial subjects were on the agenda.  Food for many of the board, See Massport, p. 16  Adams celebrates Bicentennial  ByJAMESP.THERRIEN Transcript Staff  ADAMS—Bicentennials don't happen every year and Adams residents made certain Sunday, on the 200th anniversary of this town's incorporation, that the event did not pass unnoticed.  At 3 p.m., a fire whistle blew, church bells tolled and cannons fired in a three-minute outburst that caused at least one young onlooker to shout, "Oh, my God!" as she covered her ears.  The bells, fire whistle and explosions, provided by two local colonial military groups, (The Silver Greys and East Hoosac Militia) marked the start of ceremonies at McKinley Square. About 250 persons looked on.  At the ceremonies, congratulatory messages from state leaders and President Jimmy Carter were read, and Samuel Adams, the town's namesake was praised.  More than 135 persons then attended a Bicentennial Banquet at Bounti-Fare Restaurant.  Selectman Joseph F. Banas read a letter from President Carter, which said "May the vitality and spirit of your people continue to help build a better America."  As Mr. Banas read the message from the steps of the Adams Free Library, a portrait of Sam Adams peered down from a second-story window.  Many in the crowd that lined Park Street sidewalks had their collars up and folded their arms In an attempt to ward off a stiff October breeze.  A message from the State House was read by Selectman Gary A. Shepard, and Selectman Earl F. Kelley read a proclamation from Gov. Michael S. Dukakis.  A surprise visitor was Sam Adams himself, in the person of Merton S. Anthony, who read a letter written by Sam Adams to townspeople here in  1772 explaining the formation of the Boston Committee of Correspondence.  As Mr. Adams read the fiery letter, whicii helped promote the committees that proved vital to the revolutionary movement, several out-of-state cars went slowly past and confused-looking passengers peered out.  Donald Connerton, a history  professor at North Adams State College, was introduced as the principal speaker by master of ceremonies William F. Sikorski, president of the Historical Society. He spoke on Sam Adams' often-overlooked role during the formation of the United States.  Mr. Connerton said Sam Adams  See Bicentennial, p. 16  Adams woman, 21, dies in N.Y. crash  Inside. . .  New date eyed for Glen foreclosure auction................17  Love Canal cleanup, relocation continues....................3  Weekend Football Wrapup............................24, 26  Yanks bonnb Dodgers to bock up Seattle....................27  REVOLUTIONARY SPEAKER—Samuel Adams, as portrayed by Merton J. Anthony, attended the Adams Bicentennial anniversary celebration to read a portion of one of his speeches. Sam Adams is the namesake of the Community. (Transcript-Vallette)  Adams......................20-21  Classified...................30-31  Clubs..........................15  Comics........................29  Editorial.......................18  Entertainment.................28  Living..........................6  Obituaries.....................16  Sports.......................24-28  Time Out : TV Picks............30  Vermont & Suburban..........12  Williamstown ...............22-23  Wire News..................2,3,4  ADAMS—A 21-year-old Adams woman was killed early Sunday morning when the car in which sh;» was a passenger collided head-on with another auto on Route 20 in New Lebanon, N.Y., according to New York State Police.  Patricia A, Fletcher, 12 Depot St., died when the impact of the collision severed her spinal cord, a police spokesman said.  She was a passenger in a car driven by Richard Gazaille, 23, 9 Richmond St., Adams, who is listed in stable condition in the intensive care unit of Berkshire Medical Center. He has head and internal injuries, according to spokesmen.  Police said the crash occurred at 1:30 a.m. at the intersection of Routes 20 and 22 in the Columbia County town.  Police said the Gazaille vehicle was  eastbound when it crossed into the westbound lanes while negotiating a leftward curve in the roadway. The Gazauie vcnicle then collided ^ith a westbound car driven by Bruce W, Smith, 32, Box 73, New Lebanon, according to police.  Mr. Smith suffered whiplash, the police spokesman said, and a passenger, Arleen Beers, 34, Box 35 East Nassau, N.Y., suffered a concussion. Both were treated at Berkshire Medical Center.  Mr. Gazaille was charged with reckless driving by police.  The weather  Tonight, cloudy, cold, chance of snow flurries, low 20s. Tuesday, clear, windy, cool, high 40.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication