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North Adams Transcript Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1978 - Page 2

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   North Adams Transcript (Newspaper) - January 3, 1978, North Adams, Massachusetts                                 2—The Transcript, Tuesday, January 3, 1978  Briefly  Cambodia wants troops out  BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Cambodia said today it won't negotiate an end to its border war with Vietnam until all Vietnamese troops withdraw from its territory.  Radio Phnom Penh said the Cambodian government rejected a Vietnamese offer of peaceful negotiations. The government broadcast repeated accusations against Vietnam made last Saturday, when Cambodia severed diplomatic relations with its eastern neighbor.  Cambodia claims several divisions of Vietnamese troops, backed by hundreds of tanks and planes, have invaded Cambodian territory and are trying to overthrow the Communist regime.  Hanoi replied that Vietnam was forced to defend itself when Cambodian troops invaded Vietnam, killed or wounded thousands and destroyed thousands of homes and other structures.  The exchange of charges over the weekend was the first official acknowledgment of border warfare which both governments now admit began in April 1975, shortly after the Communist victories in Saigon and Phnom Penh.  Murder suspect arrested  ONEONTA, N.Y. ( AP) - A man charged with the murder of an Oneon-ta State College student was arrested as he allegedly tried to move the woman's frozen body to a new hiding place along a lovers' lane.  Police said on Monday that the arrested man, Rickey Allen Knapp, 26, had been a prime suspect during the four-week search for Linda Velzy, 18, the daughter of a Long Island Methodist minister.  Knapp, Who worked seasonally as a tree surgeon, has served a prison sentence for rape and was under indictment on other sex charges. Miss Velzy's fully-clothed body was found in Knapp's car when he was arrested, police said.  Knapp was charged with murder late New Year's Day, state police said.  Miss Velzy, a freshman, disappeared on Dec. 9 while hitchhiking from Oneonta, where she had looked at an apartment for rent, back to her campus, about one mile away. She was reported missing when she failed to keep a date with a boyfriend. Police said they believed she was killed the same day.  State police Capt. Joseph Strajnowski said Knapp gave Miss Velzy a ride. "There was no evidence that she was held hostage," he said. Miss Velzy and Knapp had not known one another, according to Strajnowski.  Carbon monoxide kills 3  BENICIA, Calif. (AP) — Investigators suspect the accidental opening of a valve allowed carbon monoxide to seep into an Exxon oil refinery coker unit, killing three men and causing 11 others to be hospitalized, a state official said.  The invisible, poisonous gas entered the unit when five of the men were performing maintenance work Monday, said Michael Schneider, deputy chief of California's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.  The other workers suffered carbon monoxide poisoning when they rushed into the coker unit to rescue the stricken workers.  "There shouldn't have been any carbon monoxide in that coker at all. The company told me this was tested prior to them working, and that there was no carbon monoxide in there," said Schneider.  Autopsies on the dead men, laboratory tests on those hospitalized and preliminary investigations by Exxon and OSHA all pointed to an excessive level of carbon monoxide in the coker unit, which was 15 feet wide and 100 feet high, said Mark Wonacott, a Solano County coroner's investigator.  The unit is used to make coke, a byproduct of crude oil used as an industrial fuel, said Exxon spokesman A1 Vela. The unit was shut down 10 days ago for routine maintenance.  Plastic oyster does job  WOODS HOLE, Mass. (AP) - The oyster is more suitable on the half shell or in stew than for monitoring water pollution, according to two scientists who have invented a mechanical counterpart to do the job.  William B. Kerfoot, who developed the plastic oyster along with Ralph B. Vaccarro, said shellfish are recognized as one of the most successful monitors of metals and organic pollution in water, but can't be counted on.  Both men, working at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, decided to find a more dependable replacement for the chemically sensitive organisms.  "Our past experience showed us that oysters are fussy," Kerfoot said. "They won't work in all temperature ranges, since they don't like cold temperatures, and they're fussy feeders. They won't feed all the time."  Feeding is essential to the pollution monitoring ability of oysters since metals and other particles from the water are absorbed and concentrated inside them in the process.  According to Kerfoot, the artificial oyster, about the size of a nickel and known as the Metro-Disc sensor, will perform the same function, only more dependably.  Jan. 1 popular birthday  BRATTLEBORO, Vt. (AP) - Both of the children born to Gregory and Nancy Huber have Jan. 1 as a birthday.  Shaun Huber, this year's first baby in Vermont, was bom at 1:43 a.m. Sunday at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital.  His sister, Stephanie, was born Jan. 1,1977, but was not the first baby born in the state on that date.  The Hubers said they didn't plan to have their children on New Year's Day. In fact, each child was born about five days ahead of schedule.  Shaun weighed in at 7 pounds, 11 ounces, and was bom with a shock of black hair.  "He looks just like his father, " said Mrs. Huber.  N.H. curbs welfare errors  CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - New Hampshire leads New England in reducing welfare errors, according to figures released by the state Department of Health and Welfare.  For the first six months of 1977, the state reduced the number of mistakes in the aid to families with dependent children by nearly 60 percent.  Welfare Director Richard Lacombe also noted Monday that New Hampshire has reduced the amount of money spent in error by nearly 69 percent — 20 percent more than the national average.  Figures for other New England states, all decreases; Vermont 54.7 percent; Rhode Island 45.8 percent; Connecticut 41.7 percent; Massachusetts 19.5 percent. Maine registered an increase of 50.7 percent ,  Legal aid cuts court cases  WASHINGTON (AP) — A five-year-old program that provides legal aid to prison inmates in six states, including Vermont, has cut sharply into a court case backlog and has reduced the influence of "jailhouse lawyers," the government says.  The Law Enforcement Assistance Administration said Monday more than 90 percent of inmate legal questions have been settled through consultation and negotiation in the six states without requiring court appearances.  In the period surveyed, from July 1,1974, to Sept. 30,1975, the LEAA said the following number of inmate grievances was settled without going to court: in Georgia, 97.9 percent or 5,924 cases; Kansas, 92.1 percent or 2,816 cases; Vermont, 81.9 percent or 1,422 cases; Florida, 99.7 percent or 541 cases; South Carolina, 94.9 percent or 1,109 cases.  Jerry R. Shelor, vice president of Studies in Justice, of Washington, which started the program with an LEAA grant, said the legal service has reduced the power of inmate "writ writers" or "jailhouse lawyers."  "Inmates wanting legal advice may get it and walk away without owing a return favor to the institution or another inmate," he said. "Additionally, the inmate is usually better satisfied when he receives an answer from someone with legal training and experience.''  Senate aides: Links to power  BOSTON (AP) - Statehouse insiders call Leonard Alkins the 41st senator.  As administrative assistant to Senate President Kevin B. Harrington, his is probably the most visible profile in a shadowy area of the legislature — unelected legislative aides, researchers and assistants — who wield a subtle brand of power born of long familiarity with the legislative process and unbroken by the election defeats lawmakers suffer.  Those 500 or so salaried aides, whose legislative expertise and knowledge of specific issues often far exceeds that of the lawmakers they work for, walk a thin line between advice and influence through their contact with legislators. The salaries of some aides range past $30,000 annually, while base pay for legislators is $16,072.  Although unelected and not a court officer, Alkins customarily sits on the senate rostrum.  "My role with the Senate president is to be his liaison between Senate  members and the constitutional officers when he's (Harrington) in the Senate," says the 33-year-old Alkins, who earns $30,766 a year in his legislative position.  One of his jobs, Alkins says, is to "be responsive to members of the legislature."  "If I can expedite their problem without him (Harrington), I do this."  Both in the Senate and out, Alkins acts as a filter between Harrington and other legislators.  "I do not make any decisions for the Senate president," he says. But Alkins says it is sometimes up to him to decide whether an issue involves a policy decision and should be passed on to his boss.  Additionally, "he would always ask me what do I think and I would give my opinion," said Alkins, who began his career as a senate page in 1962.  "There's no question I'm a gatekeeper, a funnel," said another senate staffer. And because of that, "maybe I have a role in shaping policy."  "The staff is supposed to com  plement the needs of an elected official."  But "you should not be seen and you should not be heard," he added, asking not to be identified.  "I'm not elected and I have no business making the decisions.  "Your role is to develop expertise, the systems and process for the management of public policy."  Stella Smith has been riding herd on appropriations bills since the mid-1950s as research director for the Senate Ways and Means Committee.  With her knowledge of money bills and the departments they fund, she says she is sometimes asked to comment on bills, and can often spot flaws during her customary attendance at committee hearings.  Legislation "might come through with a revolving fund," she said of the practice which allows an agency to administer its own funding without legislative approval. "I would strike that part out — asking the committee of course if it's all right."  Mrs. Smith, who is paid about  Boston v/eW, Fitchburg ill: mayors  BOSTON (AP) - Inaugural ceremonies for Massachusetts mayors were held in many communities today, while elected officials in most of the cities, including Boston, took their oaths of office Monday.  Mayor Kevin .H. White pronounced Boston in good health as he delivered his "state of the city" address Monday and swore in members of the school committee and city council.  John D. O'Bryant, the first black elected to the five-member Boston School Committee this century, was sworn in at a neighborhood ceremony following White's address and the swearing in of other city officials downtown.  O'Bryant attended the formal 10 a.m. Faneuil Hall ceremonies, but left immediately afterwards to take his oath in Grove Hall, a predominantly black area bordering on the Dorchester and Roxbury sections of the city.  Elsewhere in the state, 26 mayors were sworn in Monday, and nine more mayors took their oaths today.  At 25, David M. Gilmai;tin is the youngest mayor in the Commonwealth, but he wasted no time in getting right down to work in the city of Fitchburg. After an inaugural address, he left a brief reception for a meeting with the schi^l committee, of which he is president]  The numbers  BRAINTREE, Mass. (AP) - The winning number drawn Monday night in the Massachusetts dally lottery Numbers Game was 3121.  Political Advertisement_  "We've got a lot of work to do, and we might as well get started right now, "hesaid.  The forme®, firefighter told his audiencce they have to face the fact that the city is "broke," and he criticized "arrogance, corruption and mismanagement at every level of government."  "Your pockets have been picked for too long," he said. "Now is the time to start fighting back."  He said on his first day as' a firefighter, he was handed the  "futile" task of taking a Ifeless child to the hospital.  "It was a sad way to start a job," he said. "Today, I have been handed the responsibility for a city that has been in a state of decline for too many years...In the first case there was no hope. Today, I do see hope and I am dedicating myself to bringing this city back to life."  In Cambridge, the nine-member City Council was sworn in, but failed, after four ballots, to elect a mayor under the city's Plan E government.  MINI SEWING CLASSES BEGIN JAN. 9TH  Instructor:  GEORGETTE MANCUSO  Chairman Home Economics Department Drury High School  inquire At  59 Main St.  Political Advertisement  663-3216 North Adams  Political Advertisement  BERKSHIRE COUNTY SALUTES FAVORITE SON ED KING  For tickets call: Rliey Bates 442.2606 Jerry Mazzone 499-1117 Marilyn Head 4S8-5949 Nick RIchardello 663-6340  RESIDENTS OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY  WILL SALUTE OUR NEXT GOVERNOR  EDWARD F. KING  AT  FIRESIDE GREEN ACRES IN CHESHIRE  ON  JAN. 6,1978  Entertainment Hors d'oeuvres  8:00-11:00 P.M.  Dancing  Wouldn't it be nice to have a Governor who:  Was born and raised in Berkshire County . . . Has twice led the defeat of the graduated income tax . . . Believes in our right to keep and bear arms . . . Supports the rights of unborn children . . .  Riley Bates 85 Wahconoh Street PHtsfleld, Massachusetts  $28,000 annually, also writes an analysis of each piece of legislation coming into the committee for distribution to key lawmakers.  "I give them the facts," she said. "What they do with it is up to them."  "You have to delegate and select people,"said Mrs.Smith's boss,' Senate Ways and Means Chairman James A. Kelly Jr., D-Oxford.  "There's no way I could have enough time to prepare and study A $4 billion budget," said Kelly, whose committee has 16 budget analysts and three legislative staffers.  Staffers' influence, he said "is more as an advocate of a change they deem necessary," he said.-"But where they convince me where money isn't being spent properly, they're the final word."  One of the dangers in a large staff Is co-option, where a legislative staff member becomes an agent of the administration, blurring the line between the governor and the legislature, Kelly said.  "If that happens the legislature can become a rubber stamp for the administration, said Kelly, who recently announced he will retire from the' Senate at the end of 1978.  DELUXE  FLORIDA CIRCLE TOUR  HOSTESS ESCORTED Feb. 13 thru  Feb. 16 Feb. 20 thru March 5 e Por Person Twin  Price Includes: Transportation hotels, admissions, 3 meals and lots more.  Features: Disneyworld, Silver Spr ings, Waki Wachee, Busch Gardens, St. Petersburg, Kapok Tree, Cypress Gardens, Jungle Queen Cruise, Villa Vizcaya, Lion Safari Country, St. Augustine, Ft. Lauderdale, and Deluxe Accommodations.  Coachllte Dinner Theater  Featuring "No No Nanette" East Windsor, Conn.  January 5 Buffet Lunch, Show eO| eg And Transportation 1:30 Matinee  JANUARY 38, 29. 1978  ICE CAPADES  Starring Dorothy Hamlil Hortford Civic Center  $18.25  Per person. Includes round trip transportation and reserved seat.  QUEBEC WINTER CARNIVAL February 3-5 »lOa Per person twin. Includes transportation, two nites Hotel Frontenac plus many activities  BOSTON SUPER SPORTS NTERTAiN-MENT WEEKENDER  Your Super Sports Weelcender Includes:  • 3 days/2 nights at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel. (Third night, Sunday only, free if you wont to stay on.) Return on your own.  • 2 Guaranteed non-obstructed view seats (midway stadium, balcony or superior) to BOSTON' GARDEN SPORTS/ENTERTAINMENT events. In case of only one sporting event available, or only one sporting event desired, luncheon vouchers are available for the Mermaid Seafood Tavern.  Choice of one of our escorted sightseeing tours, each 3 or 4 hours: The Greater Boston, Lexington and Concord, Plymouth Pilgrimage, or Salem — the Witch City.  Complimentary Victory Cocktail of your choice at the Sheraton-Boston.  $79 fP«r Person Twin  Chlldran'i Rat« Avallabl*  Feb. 3-S, March 3-S  Our 1978 Florida brochures have been mailed. If you would like to get on our mailing list give us a call or drop us a line.   

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