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Lowell Sun Newspaper Archive: August 22, 1927 - Page 14

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Publication: Lowell Sun

Location: Lowell, Massachusetts

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    Lowell Sun (Newspaper) - August 22, 1927, Lowell, Massachusetts                                BOWELfS GREATEST NEWSPAPER THE LOWELL SUN MONDAY AUGUST EVENING, 22, 1927 CAVE EXPLORER SAFE AND SOUND AFTER BATTLE FOR LIFE IN DARK CAVERN SHELLMOTJND, Tetin.. Aug. 22, Ashley, geologist mid cave explorer, today owed hid life to email cache of food he had planted far back In the recesses of the Nlck- A-Jack cave and to a small shovel with which ho dug his way to free- dom after being entombed for six 'days. Ashley made !iin exit yesterday from the famous cavern, which spreads out under three stales and from which marauding bands of Che- rokee Indians used to make their ssllies against white settlements, point In Castle Rock gulch, near the abandoned Cole City mine, eight miles from the mouth of the cave which he entered on Monrlny morning, n week ago. In a semi-conscious condition and on the verge of collapse, the ex- plorer protested he was 'none the worse for his experience, though, he the experience was har- rowing enough. As Ashley emerged from the cavern through a small opening hitherto un- known, rescue workers were prepar- ing to make a final attempt, to locate him, already virtually having aban- doned all hope of finding him alive. The entrance of the Nick-A-Jack cave is on the Tennessee line where that state Joins Alabama and Georgia and the passageways of the cavern run far back into the latter two states. Ashley entered the cave last Mon- day to examine an unexplored sub- cavern, a cavern which he says is i LONDON AIR LINER FALLS "much larger than the famous mam moth cave in Kentucky" and It was there he was trapper] by a landslld which cut off his retreat and forced him to dig his way to freedom with a pocket, knife and a small shovel which he had carried with him into the cave. A supply of fond which h had cached In the cavern, and fron which he was nol cut off by tho slide served to sustain life during his six days' fight to free himself. After a brief rest at the home of a friend, near cave, Ashley appear- j ed much refreshed as he related bis experiencs of the past week. Ilu war indignant lit suggestions that the whole affair was a hoax to advertise the cave, on which he Is said to hold a 50-year lease, and threatened t.n bring suit against, any parties or pub- lications that spread such a report. Ashley described how be entered tho cavern hy crawling for a distance of about 100 feel, on his hands and knees. Once Inside he was "amazed" at wltat he found. "I have explored Mammoth ho declared, "but I have never found anything In it to equal the uave I was in." While he was in tho cavern the landslide cut off his retreat and he was forced to seek another exit. Thou, using a lighted candle, for a compass, nnd his small trench shovel enlarge crevices, too narrow to permit passage of his body, he work- ed for six days until Sunda5T morning lie made bis way to freedom. Mechanic Killed and Seven Pauengers Injured in Into Tree Most of Occupants Dutch and Americans on Board SEVEN OAKS, Kent, England, Aug. 22. mechanic wan killed and seven passengers were slightly in- jured when an air liner, bound from Croydon field, London, for Amster- dam, crashed iu a field near here this morning. The rudder of the machine was torn loose by a strong wind, and ap- parently only skilful manipulation by the pilot averted a cala.slrophe. The plane landed between two trees, against one of which the pilot was crushed. Most of the 11 passengers were Dutch and English. There were no Americans. Manville Collector Bound and Gagged by Two Masked Men at Home MANVILLE, R. I., Aug. 22, Charles T. J. Mlgneault of this vil- lugu reported curly today that, two masked robbers, armed with revolv- ers, forced their way into his home and robbed him of aftei binding and gagging him. They lefl him tied up In a closet, he said, anc he was released later by his wife Migneuult is a collector for the Blackstone Valley Dan and Electric j Co., of Pawtucket, and the money j consisted of collections which he was I counting at' the lime. David Daly, president of the com- pany, was notified and tho police are Investigating the story. OUR BOARDING HOUSE LIKE -TAKIM6 A IAPDER x A DOOR BACK -TM' IM1b PASSES UP A LOf OF RIBBONS WITH HORSE SET LIP CAMP EWEUV rlOLB! ILAVIMS FOR A PIMH A HOLE ONE OF TWO OCCUPANTS INJURED WHEN AIRPLANE CRASHES IN TEWKSBURY To sell that old stove, try a Sun classified advertisement. WEATHER IIAU Tropical IMstiirbanvc .May Delay Take- Off of Kcdfern's Hop to Ilrazll BRUNSWICK, Ga., Aug. 22, Further delay In the take-off of the monoplane "Port of Brunswick1' on flight to Brazil, was seen today when weather reports showed a tropical disturbance apparently moving into the region eastward of the Bahama islands on the lirst leg of the mile route. Cherry Webbs Offers Sensatonal Coat Values 92 Smart Coats Now Priced from to Coats Now HALF PRICE .50 Coats Now O.50 HALF PRICE...... Coats Now HALF PRICE ____ Mick KathM-BlMfc Sa- TrhMMd With Twin FM aMl For curly Fall1 Travel This is supreme oppor- tunity to scouro n wonder- ful high prndo cont at phenomenal savings, Tuesday 1 iiiiiiNUiiitiiuiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiuimw AMERICAN TOURISTS HAVE KISSED THE BLARNEY STONE IN: CORK US YEAR CORK, Ireland, Aug. 22. than American tourists have kissed the famous Blarney Btone this year. The Curators of castle are considering limiting the number of "kissing in the future be- cause of the danger. They point out that the kissers must climb to the wall and then be lowered down head first with another person holding on to the feet, and that should the hold relax, a serious fall might result Blarney stone is gradually wearing away, partly by the action of the ele- ments and partly by the damage by tourists in their effort to kiss tnt stone. Its' potency, however, accord- ing to the common belief, remaim the same. This has been described by the Irish writer in the following words: "The touch of Blarney stone creates smooth and graceful liars of the first magnitude with a sweet tongue with women, full of guile, blandishment and potent flattery." WHERE PLANE NOSE-DIVED IN PINE GBOVK NEAR. SHAWSHKEN RIVER SATURDAY An airplane owned and piloted by Harlow, Newbury street, Boston, and carrying Timothy J. Mc- Incrny, Boston newspaperman, as a passenger, crashed in a pine grove near the Shawshoen river, Tewks- bury, Saturday afternoon. Mcinerny sustained a broken nose, .dislocated right elbow nnd numerous cuts and bruises, but Ilarlow escaped unhurt. The machine, a Trnvel-Air biplane, was completely wrecked when it plunged into the grove nose first and juried its steel propellor several [cet in the ground. Engine trouble de- veloped while Harlow was flying over Wilmington and a forced landing was icccssary. Ho attempted to stall the ilanc down into tree lops, but the weight of the motor put it into a 'dive 50 feet from the ground and it [before they arrived souvenir hunters had ripped off sections of the wing crashed through the trees. Mcinerny in the front cockpit sustained most of the shock when thrown violently j forward against the cowl. The crash was heard by motorists j on the state highway and Harlow j and Mcinerny were brought, to Low- ell in a machine and taken to St. covering and other parts. Mrs. Emma P. Maclaren, who lives near the spot where the crash curred, said she saw the plane cir- cling at a low altitude for three or four minutes before it disappeared John's hospital for treatment. Hospi- from sight in the pine grove. She tal officials were asked not to dt- jvulge the names of the two men, but they were later given out by Tewks- i bury police. j The location of the crash is in the jMncIarenville section of South Tewks- bury near a summer camp colony and near the Shawsheen river and the Wilmington line. Daw- I son and O'Neil of To.wksbury were I sent to guard the wrecked plane, but DIRECTORS ENJOY DINNER AND SPORTS The directors of the Hermes club made merry at an outing at Salem Willows and Lynn beach yesterday. Although the weather was not very promising, a program of sports was off during the afternoon, follow- ng a bountiful shore dinner at Lynn LOWRl.li BI.KCTIOJf COMMISSION Scnlod bids will lie received nt tho Office of the. Election Commission, Ity Hull, until 11 u. in., Monday, llKllst 29, for tho OK VOTING. LISTS FOK THE YKAIl 1027.' Information and spocltlcntlons to bo obtnltu'd (it tho Offlcis of the Klccllon 2omnilsnlon. x The Klccllon Cmnmtanlonern reserve he rlKhl to rnjoct ally or nil bids. I.OWRU, KT.KCTION COMMISSION TIIOMAH II, I1I1ADKN, Chalrnmln, MAHV C. McNKIL. MAUUIOH ,1. I.11U9SAHD, ANDHBW F. StcrtUry. beach. Arlstomenis Malicourtis ,was awarded the first prize for the run- ning broad jump while the marathon race was won by Constantine Vurgnr- opoulos. Antonlos Andreopoiilos and Theodore Chretos were in general charge of arrangements nnd were as- sisted by an able committee. .HIMP TO SAFETY Two Hoxbnry Men to Eartli When Tnick Is Struck by Train .FITC1IBURG, Aug. 22, Roxbury men jumped to safety this morning just before a truck in which they wero riding wan struck by a lo- comotive on K Boston Maine freight train at the Mitchellsvlllo crossing between Shirley and Ayer. Louln Plotti, driver, nnd .Inmes Henley, leaped from tho scat n few feet from the crossing, which trns un- guarded, tho truck was pushed (100 feet along the track, but wns dnmngcd only slightly. Groceries from the truck were RCRttcred along tho rond- bcd. Pnvlng work In .Mummi'r street. wns concluded at noon today nnrt Iho crow of tho Irtdlun Head Con- struction company move.rl to Parker Hired whoro they started to lay asphalt at 1 o'clock afurnoon, thought the pilot was looking for a landing field. Pilot Harlow and his passenger took off from the East Boston air- port, where the former rents hangar space, shortly after 1 p. in. At 3.45 the plane was sighted over Wilming- ton and the .crash occurred a few minutes later. Harlow purchased the plane for his own use about three months ago. CLOUDY TOMGJIT BOSTOM, Aug. 22, for Boston and vicinity: Partly cloudy tonight and Tuesday, not much change in temperature; gentle variable winds. Weather conditions: The weather is generally clear in all parts of the country excepting some cloudiness in the northeast and upper lake region and Missouri valley. During the past 2.1 hours local showers have occurred at widely scattered stations, mostly in the upper lake region, and northern Rocky Mountain district. Temperatures were near the sea- Sonal average in all the coun- try: In New England this 'morning it was generally near 64. The morning readings: Boston, New York, St. Louis, Chicago, 64; Wash- ington, Omaha 156; Jacksonville 70; New Qrleans 74; St.. Paul, Kansm City GS; Denver, San Francisco, Port- land, Ore., G6; Helena Rapid City 54. Forecast for northern New England; Increasing cloudiness, probably fol- lowed by showers tonight and Tues- day, Southern Now Knglanrt: Somewhat overcast, tonight and Tuesday. Not much chnngc In temperature. Vt- wlndu, SUN BREVITIES Watson Bros, printers, 243 Dntton at Depot 33.. Catering, the best. Lydon. Tel. 4934. J. F. Donohoe, 222-223 Hildreth bldg., real estate and insurance. Tel. Mr. Herford N. Elliott left Lowell and IH touring the White Mountains. Matthew J. Nolan of 138 Hale street is spending two weeks in Worcester. Joseph K Casey of Cross street Is spending the summer months at Hampton Beach. Rev. Bro. Elias, C.F.X., of Ports- mouth, Va., Is visiting Mrs. Hannah Daly of Marshall Bt. Mr. and Mrs. John Oliver of Glou- :ester are visiting Mrs. John O'Brien of 32 Whlpplo street. William Keheflck of Andover street will leave Wednesday for a month's visit in Halifax, N. S. Miss Mary Spillane of Tulsa, Okla- homa, is visiting her sister, Mrs. William Smith of Sll Central street. Mr. and Mrs. John Gardner of 13th street and Miss Alice 0. Heurn of Harris avenue are at Onset beach. Mr. and Mrs. William Bennett of 96 Jenness street are on an auto trip to Niagara Falls. Mr. David Scanlou of French street has returned from Portsmouth, Va., from a visit to bis sou. Bro. Ellas, C.F.X. Mr. Lawrence Porter of 237 East Merrimack street, is spending a few weeks in Kentville, Nova Scotia, and is registered at the Cornwallis Inn. Miss Josie Connors of Exeter street and Margaret Collins of Third street are spending the week at Hampton Beach. Miss Merle Stamford of Halifax, N. S., is vacationing here as the guest of Miss Katherine Mltchel, 378 East Merrimack street. Rev. Brother Kevin C. F. X. of Richmond, Va. is visiting at the home flf parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kenney, IB Lamb street. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Donnelly of 262 Metbuen street are rejoicing over the birth of a baby girl, at Che- ney-Allard hospital, Aug. 18. Miss Alice O'Brien of Pine avenue, Collinsville, is the guest of Mrs. Thomas Ryder at her summer at Spofford Lake, N. H. William C. Hamer, 310 Parker street, has returned from a motor trip to New Bedford, where he visit- ed relatives. Mrs. John J. Henry of 368 Fair- mount street and Miss JJosephine O'Brien of 32 Whipple street have re- turned from a visit in Gloucester. Mrs. Joseph Dennis and son, Leo, of Elm street, and Mrs. Thomas Nel- son of Agawam street, are enjoying a delightful three weeks' motor trip visiting various places in Canada. A son was born Saturday to Mr. and Mrs. Michael Christio of Olive street, Bridgeport, Conn. Mrs. Chris- tio was formerly Miss Josephine Mar- tin of Adams street, this city. Miss Florence Bennett of 96 Jen- ness street and Miss Lillian Ander- son of 27 Forest street left for Beth- lehem, N. H., where they will spend the next two weeks. Thomas B. Sullivan, Father of Noted Swimmer, Suffer- ed Heart Attack- Thomas B. Sulliva'n, a well known: business man of this city, and father of Henry F. Sullivan, the well known swimmer, died suddenly last night at the latter's summer cottage in Bev- erly. Mr. Sullivan suffered n heart tack late yesterday afternoon and al- though medical assistance was imme- diately given, he failed to rally anij death came early in' the evening. In the Ceotralville section of tha city especially, the news of Mr. Sul- livan's death brought regret, Tor ha THOMAS B. SULLIVAN Make it a point to read the classi- fied page In The Sun. MISS UNIVERSE Dorothy Rrltton, deMfrnnted thr maul bnmtlfnl (In In world >t 
                            

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