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Lowell Sun Newspaper Archive: June 17, 1916 - Page 1

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Publication: Lowell Sun

Location: Lowell, Massachusetts

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    Lowell Sun (Newspaper) - June 17, 1916, Lowell, Massachusetts                                'THE WEATHER 'Generally fair tonight; Sunday, south to southwest; winds. O'CLOCK ESTABLISHED 1878 LOWELL MASS. SATURDAY JUNE 17 1916 PRICE ONE CENT Paving Rammers Also Want an Instructs the Police to Enforce Health Laws -Mayor James E. O'Donnell has ad- dressed a communication to the su- perintendent of police in which he called attention to the very untidy, dirty-and unsanitary conditions exisl- Ing'-in some public, streets and alleys.. He also calls attention to the "public health" and "public streets" ordinances enacted by the. city gov- ernment and. suggests that the most effective way to inspire respect for the law. is. to enforce It. The mayor al- lows that from' tho condition of cer- tain streets and alleys that the exist- ence of the ordinances is unknown or' wilfully disregarded and he orders that tho patrolmen be Instructed to en- force them. The communication reads as follows: 'June IT, 1916. Redmond Welch. Esq.; Superintendent of Police, Lowell, Mass. Dear Sir: The care and sanitary condition of our public streets and sidewalks, our Continued to page four I'ASSBD COMFORTABLE :SUFFERED SLIGHT ATTACK OF PLEURISY NEW YORK. Juno Roosevelt .passed .a comfortable night. Hef hoped-to return to his Oyster Bay home 'this.afternoon. 'The colonel, his phvsicians announced last has filtered .a -slight attack of pleurisy. considered his- condition satis- Roosevelt this forenoon again visited his- Dr. Duel, .and, after returning to his.hotel, Ijad a talk with' Raymond Robin's', ''chairman of the progressive' national convention, and Gov. Hiram W. Johnson of. California. Reports of Warning That Movement of American Troops Would Precip- itate Hostilities Will Not Change Purpose of United States Govern- States Note to Be Dispatched Today Capture of Men Claimed by Attack French Positions 18 YEAR OLD GIRLS WHO AT- TENDED BIRTHDAY PARTY CALLED TO TESTIFY WAUKEGAN, III., June state today brought IS eighteen- year-old girls to court to impeach the testimony of Josephine Davis in the trial of Will H. Orpet, for the alleged bert. murder or Marian Lam- Thc girls had attended T. E. McDonnell's Commission nud Sale Stable, 70 .Cntvcr.St... South Law- rence, Mass. Telephone ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE will sell at Public Auction on the premises" West street. Law- rence, JUNK 10, 1U1U, at 10 o'clock a.m.', personal property 01 the late A: H. Fall, contractor, also stable ..and, land at 131 West street. Lawrence, Mass. The-personal property consists of: 8 pairs of horses, one pair of mules, one driving horse, double and single dump carts, ten ton truck, five ton truck. stone Jiggers, hay wagons, sleds, log- I ging riggings, pole riggings, single and double harnesses, democrat wagon. Concord wagon, farming tools of every description, blankets, tools, office fix- tures, etc. Everything that goes with a first class contractor's business. Goods-may be Inspected at any time previous to sale. Real estate to be sold at 2 p. m. Lot of land 70x1-10 consisting of OSOO Eq. ft ana stable 60x40. consisting or 21 stalls and two large rooms for office and help. The only available stable suitable for the contracting business In the city of. Lawrence.- Everything to be sold without limit or reserve to the highest bona firte bidder. Terms cash. Sale rain or-shine. Win. r. AVIiitc, Auctioneer. Marian's 18th birthday party on Feb. .6 three days before her death. The first of the girls to take the stand, Bernice Wells, testified that Marian seemed; ha'ppy at ,the party. She did not see her cry, as Miss Davis had testified. A miss in blue came next. She at Mr.'Dady when' he .asked tier- name and responded that she was ''Florence 'Russell.'-' She' was born at Racine, Wis-, IS years ago. The witness and two" friends spent the night of the party with Marian. "Did you see Josephine Davis take Marian aside into- a asked Mr. Dady. "No sir." FARRELL CONATON PLUMBERS. STEAM, GAS AND WATER FITTERS Tel. 1513 243 Dutton St. Burglary! Protect your valuable papers, Insurance Policies, Deeds, Wills, Savings Bank Books. A Safety Deposit Bos in our modern steel vault costs but per year. OLD "LOWELL NATIONAL BANK (The Oldest Bank in Lowell) Charlestown Has Big Celebration Parade and Banquets BOSTON', June be- gan the celebration of the 141st anni- versary of the battle ot Bunker Hill with two last night, one at the Frothingham school, under the allspices of the Northern club, and the other at St. Mary's parish house on Wlnthrop street, held by the Holy Name society of the church- As a climax to the celebration a parade was held this afternoon, start- ing at 2.30 at the corner of Bunker Hill and Elm streets. The district'has taken on a holiday appearance. Every public building, nearly every business house and many of the private residences are deco- rated for the occasion with flags and bunting. From most every house in the district the American flag has a prominent place. Americanism was the keynote of the addresses of the speakers at the ban.   man steamers in the Baltic is reported lar attack on the Avocourt redoubt to the southwest, which also failed. DEATHS Mary J. Camp- bell (nee Robinson) died this morning at the home of her son, John -J. 'Camp- bell. 8S7 Rogers street, aged years. Mrs. Campbell was formerly of Som- erville and came to Lowell to live with her son, her only survivor, about six years ago. The illness which re- sulted in her death was of long du- ration. Her son, John J. Campbell, at whose home she died, is connected with the tailoring establishment of Mitchell the Tailor. Veterans Held Annual Meeting Here and Business Session One May in Hospital Arose Over Old Feud Insure Good Health-Drink KOU SALE I1Y LOCAL DEAiEIlS Higgles Bros. UNDERTAKERS New up to date bers. Seating 100 of charge. 415 Lawrence St. luneral cham- pcoplo. Free Tel. 1JOI. The 53d anniversary of the .discharge ot the members Company G, Sixth Regiment from' tho Union army is being observed In a fitting manner to- day by the surviving members of tho company, who are now -known as the Company'G Associates. Tho observ- DEEDS WILL NEVER DIE The heroes who defended Bun- ker Hill, on June 17, 1770, are not forgotten today. Monuments have been erected to their memory and Ihev are honored everywhere. George Washington, Robert Fulton and Samuel F. B. Morse arc spoken of with respect and honor today --cause they did something that benefited their fellowmen Chalifoux's !f. the 'people of Lowell today by giving them efficient service and perfect goods, 'and the people of future generations will speak w respect and honor of the serv tnat Chalifoux's did Ihe people of Lowell in the twentieth ce.ntury. Margaret M. Flanagan. High School Commercial "Den'.- HARDWARE MEX ATTENDED .One of the most attractive features at the Xew England Hardware Dealers' association held at Mechanics hall in Boston this week was that of the United. States Cartridge Co. The es- hihii was practically the same as was presented at the Industrial show held at the Kaslno in tins city last fall. An able r.emonstrnliou was given by the rational Lead Co.'s rapid firing squad.'who sent visitors away perfectly fp.tlr.fieil that Lowell is on the.map. Among the Lowell representatives present "at the exposition were L. F. munroe of the Adams Hardware Co.. ;-amuel II. Thompson of the Thompson Hardware Co.. Napoleon D. LaFleur of East Merrimack street, and Edgar F. Parklvurst of the Bartlett Dow Co. GAMES POSTroXKIJ National: Morning game at Boston: I'ittsburE-Boston game.postponed, rain. As a result of an altercation and fight over an old feud in front of a. coffee house .on West Pearl street. Nashua. NT. H.. this noon, two men are in a serious condition in the hos- pital in that city and another is locked up charged with assault witn a dangerous weapon. The injured are: Louis Faconras. bullet in abdomen, and Demeterios Koutsonikas, bullet In side. Costas Tertis is the alleged assailant- Louis and Derneterio.-, both well known young men In Xashiia, met In front of a coffee house conducted by Angelos J. Dlamantopolos and had an argument over some old trouble. Their loud talking and- outcries were, heard by passersby. Finally: the-two men went in the rear of the store where the alleged shooting occurred. It is claimed that- Costas fired at Louts and when Demeterios interfered, he was also marie a target for one of tho shots. Six shots are said to have been fired, but all did not take effect. Diamantopolos. proprietor of the coffee house, rushed out tho rear door and found Costas standing with the revolver In his hand and the two vic- tims lying at his feet. He held the as- sailant, who did not resist, until the arrival of the police. The condition of Louis Faconras is considered very critical while hope Is entertained for the recovery of the other man. Tertis, the man under ar- rest, formerly conducted a large ice cream and confectionery store in Nashua. Middlesex Trust Co. Sts. Begins on SAVINGS ACCOUNTS Waitress Slashed and Man Fatal- ly Wounded in Attempted Mur-r der and Suicide QUIXCY, June Davie of New Haven, Conn., a wait- ress, was seriously cut with a razor and John rli Salvo, manager of a bowling alley, was probably fatally today In what the police described as an attempt at murder May. authorities, the latter stated, that di Salvo, vv'ho had been p'.irsuing her recently entered her apartment, at- tacked her without warning and then fled. He was found some distance from her, a bullet wound in the head and with liule chance of recovery. Bank Open Saturday and suicide. The woman told the according to physicians. The wom- an's face was mutilated. To the lady who is looking forward to installing electric lights at home, we have a suggestion.' Find out to what extent your husband uses electricity in his office. Then ask him if it would not also facilitate the work within the homo, Lowell Electric Light Corp., 29-31 Market Street Telephone 821, foil was mustered in for duty was as low s: Capt George i-. Cady First Lieut E Blckforo Second Lieut. Alfred H. Pulsifer First Sergt. Nathan Taylor Sergt. Frank Buncher Sergt. Stephen Kenney Sergt C'ark R Caswell Sergi Charles O Billings Corp C. Grout J Corp. Andrew J. Sanbqra Corp. Marcus W. Copps Corp George H Tabor Corp George G Tarbell Corp Williim E Hill Corp Franklin S Corp Henrv Hutchinson Musician Theodore J Crowell Musician Lathrop C Grout Wagoner William B. Kingley Privates Willis B. Atkins S. Augustus Lenfcst John M- Aberell Andrew L'ddell Benjamin Baldwin Randolph C Lord Henry T. Barnard G. K.McAlvin Charles H. Bassett Lucius I. McMasters Otis J. Brown Thos. A." McMaaters Stephen Bullens John R Moore James Christie "VI m Morris Jeremiah M. Chute Geo. B. Xorris Georce D. Coburn- Chas. H. Parmenter HenrV A. Coburn Paul Paulus Franklin Davis Edwin P.- Pearson Jarius A. Dexter George G. Perry Wm P Farrington Albert J. Pike Charles C. Foote John H. Prescott Charles Fosdlck Edward E. Reed Amos C. H. Richardson clarindon GoodwinG. H. Richardson George W. Gordon Jos. H. Rines Erastus H. Gray Alfred A. Sawyer Lev! C. Grant Aaron W... Scales Albert T. Green Joseph H. Sears Samuel W. Grimes Atmon S. Senter George W. Hall Frederick J. Small Fred'k A. Hanson. F.Martin Spaulding George Healey Lucius W. Hilton Moses M. Hilton Wm. A. Hodge Edward B. Holt Chas. H. Horton ,'m. H Spauldihs Chas. Spencer John Spencer arts. Sti CAPT. GEORGE L. CADT From a Photo Taken in War Days Albert S. StackpoTa Samuel B. Stearns ___ John F. Townsend Henry L. Houghton Townsend Chas. B. F. Hoyt Wm. A. Underwood Geo. W. Huntoon B. Kitchen Manlius Knowles Wm. H. Klmball Benjamin C. Lane Thos. J. Leig-hton John C. Watklns Augustus W. Weeks Harvev Weld Geo. W. Chas. W. Wilder ance of tha anniversary Is in the form of a reception, dinner and business session at tho American house, this city. Tho surviving members of the com- pany gathered at tho hotel at 12.30 o'clock and held a reception, the old soldiers renewing acquaintances and speaking rtminiscently of war (Jays. At 1.30 o'clock all repaired to the dining room, where a bountiful dinner was served, tho meal being followed by addresses and a business session. Company G. Sixth Reslment was or- ganized in this city In 1SS2. being mus- tered into service on 31. of the samo year. After serving their coun- try faithfully for nine months, the members of the company were dis- charged on June 3. 1563. Later the members of the company formed what is now known as tlio Company G Associates. The roster of tho company when It CHARLES SH.WV BUUXED Charles Shaw, aged about 34 years. of 34 O'Connoll street, is at St. John's hospital suffering from burns "on -.his face and right arm as a result of art ac- cMent at the U. S. Cartridge last evening. He is reported to be. resting as comfortably as possible today. A complete line of Kodaks and fresh Kodak Supplies for the holi- day. Developing nad amateurs a specialty. J. A: McEVOY, OPTICIAN, 232 Merrirnack St. CAMERA ART SHOP, 66 Merrimack St. ROOJt wanted by young man, fuN nished. with of telephone, rice T S3, -Sun.' Office, If you want help at homa or in your business, try Tha   

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