Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1894 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Boston Daily Globe

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 24, 1894, Boston, Massachusetts                                Tell Your Neiihbors Mouf the "Cooking Recipes" which areptihted in The Glgbe every day. Up-to-date reports in The Globe's news columns. Best results from ads. Try one. It will pay you. VOL XLVI-NO 116. BOSTON   WEDNESDAY  MORNING   OCTOBER 24 1894-TWELVE PAGES. THE: Furnlshine: Co, GREAT WEEK -FOR- BUYERS OP ALL PARLOR SETS, CHAMBER SETS, CROCKERY, RANGES, HEATERS, ODD CHAIRS, SIDEBOARDS. DINING TABLES, We are ready to quote a list of prices, a, mile long, which will show our exact standard. Also print no end of words wh!ch will exalt thenowness and quality of our goods. Why need weP Are wo not well enough known to vouchsafe our earnestness P SPECIAL DRIVES in every department. We mean this, it is a fact tiiatall stores of ail trades can always find special articles wiiicii can be :soiil-'Glose-on4&4b&-Gosttine. We liavB them, and printed a few In Sunday's papers. Vlllse buyers come early. CATALOGUE SHEETS ON APPUCATION. CASH or CREDIT, Free Fares and Delivery. 097 WASHINGTON ST., 097 y^bl      Cor. OonmoD St,      (14 f THEY FOLLOWED SENATOR HILL Pickpnokets had a Harvest at the Yonkers Meeting, but Were Caught and Taken to Jail. YONKERS, Oct 23-Georgre aummlngs of Boston, Frank Connolly and George Williams of New york, 21 years old respectively, three expert pickpockets, arrested here last night at the mass meeting addressed by Senator HIU, were this morning held under ?500 ball for trial. The eang worked Musio hall and the overllpw meeting to perfection, and sectired considerable Jewelry. A member of the gang, who took charge of the booty, escaped. Isaac Serapel, rabbi of the synagogue, lost a %'S> watch; lawyer "VVllllam Eiloy, a ?95 gold watch; Jerry McCue, seci-e-tary of the deniocratlc general committee, a $1D() diamond stud; J. W. Kiley, a $1011 gold watch, and O. H. Allen, a dia-monii stud and watch. Comj)Iaints are BtlU coming in. Cnmmluga was caught by ex Alderman Mitchell In the act of taking Mr Allen's diamond �tud. A memorandum book was found on CummlnKH' person, with dates and cities In wliloh Senator Hill wasi to speak. The gang was tashlon-ably attired and well supplied with money. For Chewing it's out of sight.    ' Just got on to TOBACCO. Yankee Shrewdness up to the Times. Using the Old South. Church for Advertising Purposes-Boston's Old Landmark Would Be the Making of a Great Medicine House-Will the Scheme Qo Through? THE  OLD  SOUTH CHURCH. When will business enterprises cease to covet Boston's old landmarks? Is the city growing so rapidly that the Common must give way to help improve the rapid transit problem? That Boston's public buildings, on which we look with so much puritanical pride, must succumb at last to the highest bidder? Has the Old South's turn come at last? A modern-.aHdi�w6�jiUv\�oliJ*p4to-date medicine house wants it for advertising purposes. What would the good people of Boston think if some morning on their way to work.the Old South should loom up, not as they had formerly seen it, with its dignified mien, but with its roof plentifully covered with bright, new paint-and brighter yet the words: "Lung Kuro cures all throat and lung troubles." Public sentiment might and would object to such use of this old relic of the Revolution. Why should advertising progi-essivencss carry things so far? Surely this well known remedy Lung Kuro need not resort to such means to increase that already great hold it iiow has on the people of New England. EX PREMIER MERCIER DYING. Lapsed Into Unconsciousness at Frequent Intervals Yesterday, and Was Once Thought to be Dead. MONTREAL, Oct 23-It was reported at noon that ex Premier Meroler was dead, but It now proves to have been an error. He lapses into unconsciousness at frequent Intervals, and it is supposed that one of these was mistaken for death. At a late hour Mr Mercler was still alive, but It Is not believed that he can survive the night. THE WEATaBH. WASHINGTON, Oct 23-For Maine and New Hampshire, cloudy, followed by f a 1 r weather, southeast winds; no change in temperature. ForA''erraont, light showers, followed by fair weather, east winds; no change In tempera-turo. For Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut, generally cloudy weather, poHSlblo local showers In Massachusetts, southeast winds, slightly warmer in western portion. For eastern New York, clo\idy, followed by. fair in southern, and local showers in northern portion; south winds, slightly warmer. Local ITorecaat. For Boston and vicinity: *CIoudy, but generally fa.lr weather; slight change In teraporaturo; easterly wind. The 'I'jamparttturo Yesterday as indicated by the thermometer at Thompson's spa: Sam JGf, 6am 46�, 9 a m 49�, 12 m E2�, 3pm Gl�, 6pm 61�, 9 p m B0�, 12 midnight B0�. Average temperature yesterday 49%�. The Weatner Thursdoy. The weather conditions of the country changed but little Tuesday. Clear Bkies continue to prevail, except cloudiness In the middle states. New England, lower lake region and Kt Lawrence valley, but without rain, except scattered light local showers in the two last dlstrlijts. In the extreme northwest the edge of a disturbance ha* appeared, but otherwise there in little indication of storm. High temperatures, with maxima near 80�, continue in the central valleys, but In New England the thermal range 1b low and slight, owing to the easterly winds. The highest official record Tuesday was El", at Block Island. At the evening observation the range was from B2� at that station and Nantucket to 4C� at Kastport and Northfleld, Vt. Cloudy weather was reported ^t all points and rain at Nortlifield, with amount of .03 Inch. Fai� weather is now probable Thursday, with partly cloudy Ekles, more sunshine and higher temperature. These conditions also promise to prevail Friday.__ Pleht Eipeotod with Cook's Guiie. WAGONER, I T, Oct 2,1-Word reached this city tonight that Cook and his gang of desperadoes were encamped on Verdigris river, eight miles south of V.'ag-oner. A posse of marshals left lit once for the camp and a flght Is expected. CHINESE READY_TO ATTACK. Report That the Fleet Has Orders to Proceed and That a Battle Has Been Fought Near WIJu. LONDON, Oct 24-The Times publishes a dispatch from its Tien Tsln correspondent, saying that the Chinese fleet left Wol-Hal-Wel on Monday with orders to attack the Japanese. The Shanghai correspondent of the Times says that Chinese officials report that a flght took place between the Chinese and Japanese near WIJu on Monday, resulting In the retirement of the Japanese southward. Each 'tide is said to have lost 3000 men. Heads on One Side, Tails on the Other, 1..IICO Ouo Ooiit from Rokliisou'ii. For nmuy years wo havo piesentoJ every purchaser of a With a Selected Vermont Turkey. Every MaUc of Range in the Market to choose from. Your old Stove taken for first Day-ment, or $1 down, SJ^per week. CALIi and see how lilTTLJE MONKY it will tak� to furnish from Pushed Into Tub of BoiUne Water. The 2-yettr-old daughter of a family named Keliam, living at S4 Grton St. Lynn, was pushed Into a tub of boiling water by her 4-year-old brother yesterday, and shockingly scalded. Fears are expressed that she cannot recover. As�t'i HrsienteCoffee a health drink. WhafSI PerWsek Wll! Boy: (With $3 Deposit) K   jn    PAKLOB  SET, Ul   m    CHAMBER  SBT, I i�   COOKING  RANGE, t 1^   PARLOR HEATER, Ul 0 1   NEW   CARPET, &c., &c., Ac, Ac, Ac, Ac, Ac. G. H. ROBlSON & CO., \ and 2 Ooet Sa. an�I40 Washington SL_ YOU SEE In every town or city, in a most prominent position In the showcase. CONTENTS OF TODAY'S GLOBE. Pnco 1. The oxpeoted shakoup ot the police department came last night; the new general orders in full. Hill speaks in Brooklyn. Democratic principles expounded from the stump. Chinese fleet has orders to attack Japanese; report of a battle. Faae B. Talent meets reverses at Narraaan-sett park running races. Japan will brook no foreign interfep-enoe. Five coaches urge the Harvard football players. _ PuKo a. Gen Edgar B.  Champlin and Hon Mahlon Chance speak at the Chicka-tawbut club banquet. � Charles   Francis   Adams'   views  ou "greater Boston." Czar Improving; czarowltz and Princess Allx to be married today. David Christie Murray speaks of the late Henry Herman. raise 4. Fall Biver weavera want a conference with the mill men; address issued to the buslnesB men of the city. Collision of two trains In yard o� Park sq station. Prof Newman Illustrates psychic powers. Trotting at Louisville, Lawrence and elsewhere.        , Investigation of South Boston house of correction by public institutions committee begins. Prof Pickering of Harvard on the reported looting of observatory in Peru, Eep'ublioan speakers on the stump. American missionary association in convention at Lowell. Pane �. Massachusetts' state tax being collected. Sketch of Joseph C. Finn, Boston's veteran pressman. Populist prophets predict great gains for their party. Order before school committee for $1,000,000 loam lunches must pass inspection. ' Dedication of Forbes library at Northampton. New baeebaU association gets a black eye at Pittsburg. Cambridge council concurred on Woods sehoolhouse lot. Defanlting" bookkeeper Theodore C. Faxon pleads guilty. Sugar trust case In the supreme court today. Pace 8. "The Amazons" off the stage. Rockland couple perhaps fatally Injured by a runaway accident. The mystic orders. Eeoipes sent In by New England women. Pasre O. Real estate movements. raee 11. Important auction sales of horses and carriages. rase 1�. Reed and McKinley on their travels; Stevenson in Missouri. Senator Hoar set right on an Interview; he still fails to explain that coincidence. Aluminum proves unfit for marine purposes. Cleveland stops at Greenwich on his way to New York. . The three convicts who are tci be'pa-^ roled from state prison. Examination of men charged with receiving stolen stamps. 49 YEARS IN HOTEL KITCHENS. Snapshot Interview In tomorrow's Clobe with the oldest cook in Boston. Hello, Hello! GIVE Oentral I IT IS THE ONLY CIGAR I SMOKE A HAND-MADE J"c. pIf* I 0 HAVANA FILLED O    UlUAn 294 Federal St., Boston, Mass. BEST MOCHA AND JAVA If all the people who bought Mocha and Java Coffee got whattheijhoiKjhtthere ivottMn't be a poutid of eiiher hind o/i i earth in sir months^ time �iMimni IVe do not, however, predict any Hcarcitj/ so long as imiiations can Ire boiiglu for from three to eight remits per pound less.tmmamm msoKdnnM We do not sell all the Movha and tiavu used in Boston, but all the Cojfee we do sell As Hocha and Java IS Mocha and Java,: PRICE TWO CENTS. m UNSOLLIE Candidate Conant Proud of Party Banner. Waves It Deflaatly ln7ace OppsiDi EepMlcans. Takfs His Stand Upon the Democratic Platform. Asks Mr McCall to State Where "He's At." Bailies in Tenth Congi'essional District Last Niglit. SomervlUe's . opening campaign gun for the democratic ticket was fired twice last night. When congressional candidate Conart spoke twice. His first appearance was 8,t Grand Army hail, and later in the evening he made another address In Sulioway hall. He asked Congressman MoCall several pointed questions. In both places Mr Conant held a reception after the rally and shook hands with many voters. In his speech Mr Conant said; "The democratic party will go to the polls In Massachusetts in November with courage high and flag unsullied. Our opponents are predicting success for their candidates because of the financial condition of the country. Senator Lodge, and my republican opponent In this district, seem to have adopted the argumejit that the financial crisis was caused by the Inauguration of Grover Cleveland on March 4, 1893, and that the sole remedy is the restoration of their party to power. "They insult the Intelligence of Mas-saohusetts voters when they rely upon such an argument, and the people of Massachusetts, and of this district in particular, are too intelligent to be thus Insulted with Impunity. Senator Lodge and Mr McCall know as well as you and I that these flnancial crises come at almost regular Intervals as the I'fesult of the expansion and contraction of credit. "Ex Speaker Reed frankly confessed in the debate on repealing the Sherman sliver law that the crisis of 1893 began with the failure of the Barings In 1890, at the very moment when his republican congress was passing Sherman laws, force bills and McKinley tariffs. The responsibility for the financial crisis of 1803, so far as it is due to legislation, lies wholly at the door of the republican party. ��-''Time would fail me tonight to review all the financial blunders of the republican party. Their financial policy was initiated with the passage of the legal tender act. making Irredeemable paper a tender in payment of debts, v/hlch enhanced the premium on gold and caused the payment of the wages of labor In a dollar worth for a time only 40 cents. Nearly every evil from which the country suffers today Is the ripe fruit of 30 years of republican legislation on the finances. They have left the democratlo party to struggle %vith the results of their folly in the same .spirit as the French nobles who, while they robbed the people during the closing days of Louis XV, used to repeat, 'After us the deluge.' Because they are quick sellers, always reliable, and are known EVERYWHERE. ........................��imim......�Mimr ff'- charge 3(i cfs. per jHHtnd, 5 pounds for $l,7ii, or trill send exiiress paid to ang address in Xew Jingland J(t pounds in a tin can for $3.i.;J.   Jly v,i-v.-s, wii'cli uv. hub^'la:,    pay.'Jg i OiitDjilC Iq tially thoRc of the dcmorrutic party of nnMui'ii K,.|iel lui't CiTiimi Cu.-ii fur rciighB.) Mastachu.seus, arc de; larcd In my Ipi-I avow and  UcfeiiJ  ihuni  here or  tlso-' '"J""     "t""""" n-heii-'. 1 liflit'Vf that free raw niatei^.al.s should bf uteor.ifd to Ihu ;niJi!strie.s nf Three General Orders Read in the Sixteen Stations. Coulter Made a Deputy, Watts Chief Inspector, Dawson an Assistant, Brown a Captain-New Lieutenants and Sergeants. Another ot the periodical ehakeups which have become almost chronic with the Boston police department was experienced last evening at roll call. As usual, the changes promulgated in the orders were the source of keen disappointment to many and of pleasure to a few. And, of course, everybody was more or less sui-prlsed, excepting those who expected nothing and got it. It Is now Deputy Superintendent (instead of Chief Inspector) Coulter, Chief Inspector (instead of Capt) Watts, Asst Chief Inspector (instead of Capt) Dawson, and Capt (instead ot Lieut) Thomaj H. Brown. The changes are all "for the good of the force," and are said to be but the forerunners of many more to come, all of which are a part of chairman Martin's plan to make an Ideal police force. The orders had long been expected and during the past few days had been given in substance Iti the Boston newspapers. Many of the men who, until a few days ago, had believed themselves to be in line for promotion, had come to the conclusion that their time had not yet arrived, so when they found that the board had actually passed over them they were not so much put out as those men who failed to accept the newspaper reports and who still believed that their promotion was possible if not assured. The promotions of the men named was not so much a surprise as It had been rumored throughout the department that the changes were to be made. However, Capt Dawson's name had been freely mentioned as a candidate for assistant chief Inspector, and when It was known that he had received a sort of promotion It was adsnltted everywhere that he had successfully been playlngthe part of a "dark horse." There were but few, however, that were In the least bit sorry to see him benefit by the changes. DEPUTY fiUFT JAMKS M. COULTEB. Monday when it was announced that several men had taken a non competitive examination it became an assured fact that the commissioners had decided to pass over the existing civil service list and this was sho-svn to be true when the orders were read to the department last evening. True it is that several men promoted were promoted because of the percentage they received at the examination taken more than a year ago, but a large number were promoted on the examination they had been asked to take without competition and because of meritorious services. There was a good deal of excitement in the 10 stations during the reading of the orders, but In each Instance when a man was found to be promoted his associates did not fail to give him a round of applause and a hearty grasp of the hand. The orders were a bitter dose to many aspirants for higher hoiior.s, but there was nothing for them to do but abide by the dtelslon of the commissioners, although in many Instances the latter were scored in a pretty severe manner. The most Important changes in the oiders were the appointment of Chief Inspector James M.' Coultw to be a deputy superintendent of police, Capt William B. Wutts to be chief inspector, Capt Henry Dawson to bo assistant chief inspector and Lieut Thomas H. Brown to be a captain. When the orders were read In the inspectors' offlce there were a good many sorry to see Chief Coulter leave them, but they were all duly gratified at having such a sterling officer promoted to command them as Capt William B, Watts. Each man was duly congratulated. The liquor men were almost crazy with joy when It was announced that Lieut Thomas H. Brown had been pro moted to the rank of captain, but still to be in command of them. They were greatly pieced also that one of their number, George B. Saxton, had been honored with a well-merited promotion to the rank of s-^rgeant. Besides. tlKese well-merited promotions of men high in rank, there were also many othtr promotions, nearly ol! of which are considered good ones. In the orders also there was a tinge of sadnets, as several well-known men, who have been connected with the department for many years, were retired on half pay, either because they had passed the age limit of 60 years, or because they had become physically incapacitated for further active duty, These old men, without exception, have many friends in the divisions with which they are connected, and also in the department in genet;al, and the fact that they must quit the service for good on Thursday evening next, and sever their many pleasant relations, seemed almost a pity. Besides the above mentioned promotions those of Sergts John A. Brickley. James P. Sullivan .t-nd Tohn B. I'.osatto to be lieutenants were looked upon as meritorious rewards for good and faithful service. The general orders, stripped of their formal phraseology, are as follows: General order No. 230. 1. Lleuts Patrick Lee of division 11, Joseph B. Blanchard of division 16, John P. Gardiner of division 5 and Joseph H. Warren of division 7, having served 18, 27, 26 and 39 years respectively, and having been pronounced physically Incapa- Coiktiimed 011 tlie Second Pnsse. Given Away To Sufferers from Coughs, Colds  Dyspepsia. For the past twenty years the remedies named below have been used with unvarying success in his private practice by their discoverer. Dr. Geo. H. Payne of Boston. The standard Medicines Co., knowing their great value, has purchased them, and now offers them to the ^-eneral puMic: and, to ef-. feet tl'.eir .speedy introduction, has placed tiie price at only 25 cents per bottle, and makes the additional hard times indacem^'nt of J350 in (u)ld (.'0!:i to purchasers, to be awarded in thre.-suiiis as above. il'u^iUvfly ^ i'.rt'R Iiyspepsiti- (Uio IkUiol iivci, iiiimi'iliiilf Itflict.) !\IaiT--:ai-hUi'ftt.'-^ and of t!if ciKtiiifV. I believe that the go\'LriiHu-m shuuld Kiadn-ally go out of the bai:king business, Coutiitued ou till) FuurtU l*aKe. Ltinch at Boston t.unch Cou ;eutlciiicit, v.h! Xww*' iNm ;� in ''O.i .eTit-rt to recipeII t'lc ;ar ul tlie ��!     � t i      \W i'tittloh, ttiul Hicl�lili;'9       i- - v. w y , .-uu aiUK-iiiu'o Mr. J. E. laCE. Aciv;!, ?� :r, ik.':t �; Herald. . Mr. A. L I'OWTjE. Ad.^.y.^.j. Ku.un Journal.| lur. i". iuciioMALi),        II;;r, i>-.iBi'ju Past. Wtduestl;;;. Oct. l'*-;*^.;,  .a.l ill' .� bv all 'in t;^:>iB, ami by THE STANDARD MEDICINES CO., 197 Ifomont St. and 5/ Berkeley St,. Bostx�n. V.lfO wlU mail Si.et'itU' >'o. 30 or No. 3, puMuae ttnt. oil receipt of 'iXi^.; >'g. ii8 ou rt-ci'.iiJt of liSu WEEKS & POTTER CO., Wholesale Agents. BY ITS ICORB. Hill Wants His Party Fairly Judged. Renlles Presents tlie lac Tariff Bill DefenaeU iv Strong* Terms. Its Effect on the Conatry Fully Explained* Cleveland Commended for Hla Patriotic Course. NHW YORK,.Oct 2S-"I have been Informed that there has been a reorganization of the democracy of Kings county. Well, If you have another reorganization, you'll have to hire an^" other hall." How those Brooklyn demoorate, gathered In the academy of Muslo, did cheer when David B. HUl emlUngly made that remark at the opening of his speech tonight, "Gathered" In the academy Is not the word to describe that crowd. Compressed oomes nearer desorlblng the condition. Bach of the several notable times Senator Hill has spoken In that hall the reporters have truthfully reoorded "a larger crowd than ever before." Another record was made tonight. The doors were opened at 6 o'clook. Before 7 the hall was filled, and at 7 the police lost control of the thousands on Montague st who were struggling for admission at the three entrances, an* rushing past the powerless bluecoats, particularly those at the stage entrance, until there were 1000 men on the stags in a space which will comfortably seat 200.   . In spite of all the discomforts It had to endure the crowd v/as good-natured while waiting the 40 minutes after 8 o'clock for the appearance ot the hero of the evening. Every one in the building knew well enough that had Mr HUl arrived at the theater, or as near as he could approach unaided, at 8 promptly, as, indeed, ho did, it would take at least half an hour for the police to make a way for him through the pack about the entrance, and 10 minutes would not be too long to allow the senator to recover his breath and rearrange his clothing. Aa It was, his usually carefully-arranged blaek tie was eadly awry when he spoke. Hon James D. Bell Introduced the Oontlnuntt on tite Fourtli Pase. Mr. James H, Aahton I Am Well Thanks to Hood's Sarsaparilla wWcl cured me of rheiimatism and t^lcen Sarsaparilla on my leg, which >lf ^ ^ I had foryears and f      \\ � could not cure.   I ^ J___ _ _ regard Hood's Sar- saparilla and Hood's Pills standard medicines. j. H. Ashton, night watch man on Islington bridRC, West Rochester, N. H.  Get only Hood's. Tnlw Hood's Pills wltIiBood'9 SarsiiparUlit. Or others wi.liliiK to icll or borrow gsoo or more cn leRiicl<,. or unrtlTldecl pari of imjr rent e.t�te la liostoii; no clmr^p for cun u'.tat on, InforniAtlon 01 valuation. Apiily In iiersoii only, no le(t�i. fto* .wwed. to B. a. AIXtA', as Court st, rooni 81�. WSSniat* 0� On Egyptian Lines, A little more thaa chair and less than couch. You should see it to fully appreciate its graceful lines, which everywhere perpetuate Hogarth's famous cur\'e. The seat is unusually deep, giving to the design an oriental flavor. The chair is, in fact, strongly suggestive of the o!d Egyptian chairs on thj basrelie.''5 in the Museum at Gc.etrelt, except that here the height Oi tlie back is reduced and added to the depth of the seat Otherwise the outlines are alike. The cl'.air is as luxurious as it U artistic,   liisjiireto at*racl attentiMi in any tiiawiiit; room by its unique thar.icter.   It jiairly bristlcB with style. Th� covering is a Satin Dsmask. 'Maine's FimitiirB Ca 48 CANAL STREET. ?11861 06?576   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication