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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: October 19, 1894 - Page 3

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 19, 1894, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON DAILY GLOBE-FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1894. A Well Attested Pact. YcB, you know all about if, of course you do; your Jnother made you take it; her  mother did tlie same T/vith her; it -was repulsive to your palate; you tried lard to escape it, and often said "I woa't;" but then that doae waa castor oil, and possibly saved your life'. Such has been its history for geuerationa past. The scenes have changed siuce then; auothcr stage is set. Not Anxious to Have a McKinley Tariff. LAXOL has the boards, and your baby plays a part: His liuc-g are short and to the point. "Mamma, I want some more". That's because he likes the taste, aud won't be happy till he gets it. What he craves is lyAXOI*, a new product of tlie castor bean, made by a recei;ttly discovered process. It has ali the medicinal prdpci-ties of pure castor oil but, unlike that nauseaus dose, it is delicious to the taste and acts upon the sensitive tissues of baby's delicate organs with a subtle sense of soothing gratefulness that may save your baby's life. Ask your doctor. Saves the Baby's Life. M. Calm & Bro., N. Y. All Druggists, 3SK> WfflD HEIPEL THEM. IHand Tubs Make Big Records at Peabody.  Roxburys Wo tlie Best Play and (let a $400 Cash Prize. THEY ABE SOT ARTISTS. 'Torrenta and TJnion Vets of PeaT)ody Get Second and 'Ihird Money. PEABODY, Oct IS-Bookaale park �was today the mecoa of hundroda o� I'fflro fighters from all parts of the state, es^well as New Hampshire and Maine, the occasion being a tournament, In which 17 hand enarlnes wore tested, and 'iblg records made. [ The opening feature was a parade at ln.0.30 a m, In which there were seven veteran flremens associations and nine engines in line. There was only one band In the procession. Many of the firemen did not arrive In |town until noon, and went directly to the park. The muster opened at 12.43 '(P m, upward of 30QQ spectators being on the ground. The Judges were George Gushing of Hlngham, Capt W. F. Martin of Hlng-ham, Capt E. W. Brlgham of Hudson, Capt w. b. Cade of Cambridge, H. Jj. Chase of Westboro and Capt Dow of tBoston. The prizes aggregBted $1000, divided as Ifollows: First prize $400, second $226, Ithlrd $150, fourth $100, flfth $75, sixth $50. I The platform -vvheTe the engines (worked was on the right of the entrance. The hose, 250 feet in length,was irun across the road leading to the track �over a slight rise to the platform, to the liplpe on the left of the track. I The playing board began at a point 160 feet from the pipe, and was 84 feet long, jnaking the distance 234 feet. Each company was allowed IB minutes to get in position, play and retire. [The first tub to make the trial was the fPhenix of Marblehead. Four trials were made, � the best play being 129 ft 9% In. Whe Phenlx boys worked hard, but the Svlnd, which blew hard across the track, �cut the streams Into spray. The next in line was the Roxbury tub, which was given six trials In all thsy made a distance of over 170 ft. On the |�lxth trial the wind carried the stream way over the paper, and landed large drops of aqua pura 218 ft 11% in from the starting Une. A short time after a protest was entered against the Roxburj' company, it ibelhg alleged that the engine played ;f rom the tank. The protest was not fav-jored, however, by the Jiidges. . The Torrents of I'eabody took the i stand at 1.15 p m and made five trials, I covering In each over ISO feet. In one trial a stream was thrown 210 ft % in. 'The wind favored the stream each trial. When the Nashua machine was placed �Jn position the wind greatly assisted the firemen, and a stream was thrown 201 ft '11% In. At 2 p in the Watch City crew of Wal-tham dre^n' in line. Her best play was ISO ft 41,4 in. When the White Angel of Salem drew In line the crowd got excited, as sentiment was about evenly divided on the capacity of the tub to defeat the Union of l'�!abody. On the first trial the wind favored the White Angel stream, and a record of 207 ft lOVi. in wan made. Four other trials were made, but owing to a change of the wind the streams were broken, the next best play being 102 ft }A In. The Essex tub made a record o� 183 ft n\ in, and the M. A. Pickett tub of Marblehead played 201 ft 2^fe in. When the Unions of Peabody took the stand at 3.30 p m the crowd cheered themselves hoarse. Five trials were made, of which the third was the best, 208 feet 2% inches. When it was announced that the Unions had defeated the Salems the unlonltea and their friends shoiited and hugged each other, and ran about wild Wl'th joy. The old Gerry tub of Marblehead ,niade five trials, the best play being ^77 feet 4% inches. The Butcher Boy of South Bralntree made five trials, the. second test proving the best In a play of lUl feet 7% 'Inches. The C. F. Burgess tub of Rockport, (Me, scored 202 feet 10 inches, the Hyde . :Park veterans 17D feet CVi inches, the Franklins of Kssex ICS feet 0% Inches, land the Kennebec of Brunswick, Mo, |1SS feet.  The playing concluded at 5.15 ''^Following Is a summary of the playing: Mnchllio                                          Ft In noxbi.rys ...........................21R W'k H'ornmis, I'ouliody  ..................21� ii JJuloii VijtK, I'euboily ................20S 2v4 Matane .............................207 1014 KJ F Um^B<^BH of llockiKirt, Mo ........202 10 tNiiHliuii .............................201 11% PiokiillB, Murtilnhoiiil   ...............201 Vf, Butphct' Boy of South Dndntroo......101 7% 'Knnneliuc, Ilrunawitli. Me.......-------1H8 KVulthiim ...........................IhO KSBOX ..........-...................IJjIJ Bydo Pnrk VptR  ....................17� Gerry of Miifblolicad ................liT il'rankllliB, I'jssex ....................108 UindroBTOgKln, TopBliMi), Mo .........J6J 11% peptiinc.JiJHwlch...................141 10^ Sec Carlisle on Association Football Players. Oi)in!�n Was Asked by One WIi� Wislied to Import a Team. Some Baltimore Players, it is Said, are Subject to Oontraot Law. WASHINGTON, Oct IS-CorislderabJe interest Is manifested In treasury circles over the statements that a number of the players In the Baltimore professional football team are Englishmen, and prior to their coming to the United States were engaged in professional football playing In England. In August of this year the treasury officials were asked If professional football players under contract would be allowed to land. The application-came from Baltimore, from one who wished to Import a complete English team to play In the United States. In answer to this req^uest Sec Carlisle telegraphed as follows: "In the opinion of the department football players are not artists, and coming Into the United States under contract would be prohibited from landing." Whether these players now engaged by the Baltimore team are part of the players who desired to come into the United States in August last Is not known at the treasury department, but the immigration bureau of the treasury department probably will Investigato the allegations made. 0% H?hi!Ulx, Murbli'bead to kiagaba palls JTOK $10. iorand Excursion on the Fltchburs; and West Shore Hoads. Thursday, Oct 25, the Fltchburg road JXV'IU give Boston people nn opportunity .to visit Buffalo and Niagara Falls, the lereuieat natural ivonder in the world, for $10 for the round trip. Tickets will be good going only on train leaving the union station, BoBton, at 3 p m, Thurs-Hay, Oct 25, arriving in Buffalo at 0 and at Niagara Falls at 7 next morning, returning by any regular train leaving [Niagara Falls not later than 5.07 p m, JOct 28, and Buffalo not later than 7.35 o, ni, Oct 29. I  There is no extra charge to visit Goat 'Island, Luna island,  American Falls, "Littlo Sister Islands, the Great Horse-�fchoe Falls, and Prospect park, as by virtue of purchasp made by the state uf New York, theae, the principal points 'of interesl, are.now froa to all. I   Sleeping car accommodations can be secured in advance at 250 or 300 Wash-'tngton Bt, Boston. 1 ------^_ ' � Brown Baseball Offloers. \ PROVroENCB, Oct IS-The annual ttieellng of the Brown university base ball as.soclation was hold yesterday in aiannlng hall. The result of the balloting: C. M. Graves 35 pres, B. A. Locke no vice pres. H. F. Huse BG sec, C. M. GalUip iiS treas, Q. A. Matleson �6 poorer, W. G. Cady !)5, C. P. Nott iiC, a''rank O. Jones U7 exec com; faculty Pj-of N. F. DaviB; alumni, R. B. Com stock; undergraduate, F. D. Aldrlch B5, iidvJsory com. GUSHING PROCESS GO. (E.taWUUetl IhSJS.) IMPORTERS AND REFINERS  e rAMOlrl�clISHI^e biUy ^* litl"'""^"*'      Teal uleston h b-----...........--------h b Gnlloway Barlow r w.- - . -.v v?  HiKBinB S Jenltina r w___.....--------------r w Ooiiper Kenny 1 w...............\ w Gupton Sumlorliintl I w______,-------1 w Conuelly Robertson c...........................c .Sutton Scorl.'-Boston 4, New 'Vork 3; refereeH, Piirdy and ^laBtersou; goalH, by Boston, A, Jenklna a, .Sunderlaml, Barlow, New York, Oooper, Connelly, scrluimnge. Time 45 minute lialvoo. _ Brooklyn 3, Philadelphia 1. NEW YORK, Oct 15-It does not look as though the sporting public in this vicinity were going to die of heart disease caused by over enthusiasm for the game of professional football. Still the game seems to be gaining in popularity in Brooklyn, for at Eastern park this afternoon 18 persons paid their way into the grounds. It was "Ladies' day," by Pres Byrnes' order, and four youthful members of the fair sex were on hand to see the Brooklyns defeat the Philadelphlas. The Brooklyn players are anxious about their pay. They left good positions in Fall River to Join the league, and now It looks to them as though they would be left out in the cold. In spite of their anxiety, the Brooklyns played well and won the game.  The Une up: BROOKLYN PHILADBI;PHIA Rhea g .....g Deardon ColllKau B riuFhes fb------------fb Lagen Fagtn  f b.................^.fti Turner IjjiL'rasEo  b b.........   ..........---..hb  Daris I'eokey b b.............................b h Lee FonUi  hb_______________. .,.hb Moutcomery BauulBter rw------------------rw ,7 Brennan Farrell  rw................._..-rw  D Coehriin Hanlngton Iw.....----------Iw Breuoan Borden Iw..........-......---Iw Montasnn I'emhorton c......................-o Uiughran Goals, flrst half, Hughes; secouQ halt, I'eiu-bertou 2,  Loughran.    LlneHinen,  Tobln    " Brooklyn, Biennuu for Phllndelpbia. He Thinkii Hill Will be Elected Governor of New York. WASHINGTON, Oct 18 -Collector Smalley of Vermont was very busy today visiting the various bureaus of the treasury department and attending to the routine matters which had occasion.'', his trip tb'this city. It is probable that as one of the results of his visit the force employed in some of the divisions of his office at Burlington will bo increased, especially in that branch which has to do with the inspection of incoming Chinese. Asst Sec Hamlin and Mr Crowley, the superyislng special agent, are preparing a new system for the purpose of more effectively carrying out the provisions of the exclusion law, and it will probably require the services of an enlarged force at each of the ports of entry used by the Mongolians. Mr Smalley expects to return to Bur llngton on Saturday. He says that the duties of hla office have kept him so busily employed that he has had no time to devote to the stvidy of politics. "I know less of the drift of political events now," said he, "than I have for many years. I have been somewhat \x\-terested, however, in the situation in New York. 'Prom all that I can learn, HIU 1 growing stronger there, and I hope and believe that he will be elected. He ought to be elected, for it was a very courageous thing he did when he aS' surned the leadership of that fight. "His candidacy, and the gallant fight he is making, Is more for the success of the party at large than for himself, and I do not see how any man who calls himself a democrat can bring himself to vote against him this year. �'The democrats have much at stake in New York now, and if there �was ever a time when they needed to settle up their differences among themselves, and stand shoulder to shoulder for party success. It is this year." Speaking of the congressional situa^ tion, Mr Smalley, who Is the represent, aitive of Vermont on the democratic national committee, said: "I do not take much interest In th_ fight for a majority in congress. Hero we have had a majority of nearly 100, and yet Tom Reed practically ran th house. If he could do that with such a majority opposed to him what will prevent him doing the same with a smaller democratic majority? I for one would prefer that It should be a repub. ilcan congress thajt he was running, I'ather than a democnutlo one. "The great evil wo have been sub. jo<;ted to in recent congresses has been that of absenteeism. With the demo crats in their seats they could have managed the affairs of the house, with, out leaving them to the managemen or mismanagement of the republican leader. "I suppose If I was living In a dis trict represented by one of these demo cratic absentees I would do everything I could in a fight to reelect him, but would take the occasion to say what thought of hlB conduct." Representative Apsley Is now In charge of the republican congressional com. mltteo in the absence of chairman Bab cock. Just before leaving, Mr Babcock gave out a statement of the clajims he and his colleagues are making on the result of the congressional elections. He tays that his present information leads him to anticipate the election of 190 republican members. He gives up the contest over the sen ate, and concedes that that body will remain democratic for the next tw year.*^ at least. He says: "I do not think that we can hope to gain a majority in the seno-this year.  The democrats have 20 holu overs, while we have but 21, and 1 shall be quite satisfied to hold our own. Thai, I am convinced, we can do." fur Baltimore 5. Washineton 1. BA.LTIMORB, Oct 18-The professional football season was Inaugurated at Union park today. The home team outclassed Washington. The score was Baltimore 6, Washington 1. The lineup: BALTIMORE WASHINOTON Wtewart g - �......K Lynch .lohn MeKendrIck r b.........,.-r b MeDevltt FcrguHon lb----...----......^��...lb Devlin M t^alvey  hb-------------,------hb  Riley Davlu  bl.......-------_______. .hb 'I'lTauey W MeKendrlck h li________,____hb Gallagher BurUey  r w......,----.._ ,^....... r \i   WeMHOn Ireland rw..............^.-....-rw Shunahau .lamea McKendriclc c........c Dean Wallaee Iw......1 w Graljam Llttlo Iw......-.........______Iw Harvey Goals klelied. Baltimore. J McKeudrlek U, Wull/iee, Little. Ireland, U'ashluglon, Wobbuu; lineauien, Applyby tnrt Parr. Mckinley in new york. Baltimore OiSciola' Bide. BALTIMORE, Oct 18-The officials of tho Baltimore baseball and exhibition company. assert that they have n r had any correspondence with Pec Carlisle 111 relation to biin/iing Into the United Slates profeK.slonal foolbyll pluy-ers from England or elsewhere. Nearly all the men on the Baltimore >lc-iim are rv>sldents of Detroit. An Inv'eBtlgatlon by the Immigration bureau might dls-clo.se the presence cf two or three alk-ns In the Baltimore lineup, but the man-ugemeul claims to be Ignorant of such a fact. He Will Bpealc at Elsht Moctlnes lu One Doy of Hla Tour. NEW YORK, Oct 18-At republican stfite  headauarters  this  morning Sec Hackett Said that arrangements had been made for Gov McKlnley's tour i this state. The governor will begin his New York campaign on Oct 25, when he he will speak In the afternoon at Dunkirk, the evening he will appear at a monster mass meetUig In Buffalo. At noon on Oct 2G he will speak at Utica, and in Syracuse tlie same even ing. He will end his work In the state Oct "7, but he is booked for no less than seven meetings that day, besides otie in Philadelphia. He will leave Syracuse on a special train on the New York Central, and the flrst stop will be at Little Falls, where he will address a meeting from the rear of the train. He will then speak at the following nlaces, where stops will be made; Fonvlu, Amr^ierUam, Bcheneclady, Hudson and Poutvhkccpsie. life will then crcit's the river to New-Viurg, and th�re make liUs lust speech In the stale, l^rom Ninvburg Gov McKinley M-111 take a West Shore train for JersfV (!^ity, v.'here a special ti-ain will take him to Phllarielphfu. He win reach Philadelphia about 9 o'clock In the evening, but in lime to make his eighth and most imiiortant address for the day. On Monday he will continue his tvork In Pennsylvsnia. to his old friend Mr Welch and.lald the letters before him. "When his executors were confronted, after his death, with an indefinite proposition from her whether there was anything in the will for her or not, the executors referred her to Mr Welch. He alone was aware of her having any relations with Dr Blgelow in his lifetime. "She went and saw Mr Welch, not as she says alone, but in the presence of another person, artd we shall expect to prove by Mr Welch and that other person what took place at that interview. "She wanted to know whether there was any gift for her or provision made by Dr Blgelow, in his lll*etlme, for her, or If there was anything left for her by will. Mr Welch said there was neither, so far as he knew, and she said she expected that she would receive $2000 or ?3000 by will from Dr Blgelow. "Her claim had a growth which was stimulated and nurtured by the condition of the statute under which the claim is brought. "It was Impossible for her to have had an interview with Dr Blgelow at the time she says, except in the month of August. All the tline from May till then Dr Blgelow was unconscious, and incapacitated from seeing anybody. � . "After August he �went to Newton, and was not accessible to her until after the period when the statute would debar her from recovering. "We shall show that when Mr Chas. H. Bartlett, who has been examined here, went to see Mr Ayres, he said he knew nothing whatever personally of any promise to pay $150,000 to Miss Bartlett on the part of Dr Blgelow, or any other sum. "A proof that Dr Blgelow was not unmindful of his obligations was Shown by the fact that he left the sum 'of .$10,000 to Miss Slayton, a nurse who attended him in his last Illness. He directed that it be deposited In the hands of Mr Edward W. Hooper, his old friend of 45 years' standing, and one of his executors, and that it be deposited In the Massachusetts hospital life insurance company, the interest of which was to be given to Miss Slayton while she lived, and the disposition of the sum itself to be made by her in her will.     , A GREAT MAN'S WORDS Q. Did you state that you knew noth ing of the promise on the part of Dr Blgelow to pay your sister $150,00(1, or any other sum? A. No, sir, I did not. Q. Did you � understand him to say that he had made provision for her?. A. Yes, sir. Q, In case of his death? A. Yes, sir. Betsy Noyes Bartlett, mother of Miss Bartlett, was then helped to the witness stand by the plaintiff.     . ' She knew that her daughter made preparations for, her marriage In 1878, but she was not married then or since. She did not know Dr Blgelow personally, but she knew of him, and he was very highly spoken of. Mr C. H. Bartlett, recalled, stated that he had mailed letters to Dr Blgelow from his sister In Haverhill, Maiden and Boston. This closed the plaintiff's case. Mr Hoar then said he would mdVe thp court that the plaintiff be compelled to select which of the counts he would ,go to the jury on. The case ought not to be permitted to go to the jury on all the counts In the present state of the testl. mony. After some further argument Chief Justice Mason directed Mr Hadlock to select some one count on which he would elect to have the case ffo to the jury. Mr Hadlock (smiling)-I object, I except.  I elect the flfth count. Judge Mason (smiling)- Very well, Mr Hadlock. Mr Hoar-Now, your honor, I ask you to rule that on this flftli count the plaintiff is not entitled to recover. This count v/as filed ,Sent 29, and in It the date of the alleged promise, as It has since been changed. Is set down as May, 1SS7, instead of June of that same year. Chief Justice Mason in giving judgment said the case of Chase against Fitz, of which Mr Hoar had spoken, contained language which tended to support the claim he had made, yet he was not aware of any distinct authority that would sustain the proposition, to hlB mind, and he could not readily adopt It. He would, therefore, rule that Mr Hoar's motion could not be sustained, Mr Hoar asked that an exception be noted. 'We shall show that her claim is inconsistent, and we ask that It be scrutinized with the greatest care, so that In forming your judgment upon the known conditions under which it could or could not have- been made you will have everything which it is possible for us to show in order that you may form a proper judgment. "We ask that you shall not be swayed by the fact that the claim Is made by a woman of dramatic power, of nerve and coolness and skill, who has testified to certain things which she states were facts." Nine witnesses for the defense were then called and sworn. WUat a WoTlil-RenovirnoiI Writer 'Hbk to Say About the Kcqnlremcmts of Blodorn Times. Dr. Robert Farquliarson, an eminent jjEnglish physidi'an, has an interestiug plea for moderate drinking in Black-ivoocfs Magazine. The doctor contends that under the stress and struggle of modern civilization few people beyond middle age are placed under normal physiological conditions, and he thinks that a little alcohol helps to round the corners and plane away the asperities of existence. He advises that alcohol be taken with food, and preferably at the principal meal of the day. The advice is also given that it be taken in the form of pure whiskey diluted. This he claims aids digestion, and tones up the system to a wonderful degree. Be sure, however, he adds, that only pure whiskey is used. "The maker of a pure whiskey deserves the gratitude of a nation." The words of this eminent man need no endorsement. And they are just as true for America as England. The best physicians of thepresent day all agree upon this point, but they are very careful to say that the whiskey must be pure. There is also a universal agreement th.it Duffy's Pure Malt is not only absolutely pure but the only medicinal whiskey upon the market. It has stood the test of time. It is the most popular preparation in America. It accomplishes what has not been and cannot be accompliished otherwise. Be very careful that your druggist orgro cer gives you the genuine Duffy's; and under no circumstances take any other. crand;?ssi. lirs Washtnicton Bt. MANSFIELD & MAGEE...Loise(!9 and JlaiSaseni Eve'gs al 8. Mats. Tues., Thiirs. atid Sal. at 2. 'I'oleplione 310 Tremont. Blcyclea oliecUod free, " STILL HIS WHISKERS GREW," 'Matinee Tomorrow. 55 Introtlucine AW.THrrR E. nrotri..'roN BiMi ssa coMKO^y nooitiKRS. STEAUSa  WHITES TO HUiIj. LAWYER HADLOCK TESTS HIS CHAIR. Will Withdraw from the Eaes Under Certain Circumstances. ROCHESTER, N Y, Oct 18-A. L. Kin-kead, Nathan Strauss' private, secretary, arrived in this city this afternoon. This evening, after Senator Hill reached the hotel from Mt Morris, Mr Klnlcead sent to him a letter which he had brought to the senator from Mr Strauss. It is understood that in this letter Mr Strauss announced that he would not run for mayor In c^se Senator Hill pei'-mitted the use of his name on the Grace municipal ticket. Mr Klnkead did not see Senator HIU at all. He waited In his rdom until after Senator HIU had sent to him his reply to the letter from Mr Strauss. Then Mr Kinkead gave up his room in the hotel, took his grip and hurried to the station and toolt the train for New York. All Mr Kinkead would say about his mission was that he had no talk with Senator HIU. A reporter saw Senator HIU at o'clock this �venlng In reference to the Strauss letter, but the senator declined to say a �5\v3rd on the subject. After the senator's speech this evening he was seen again by the reporter, and he again asked to be excused from saying anything about the letter of Mr Strauss to him or of his reply to the same. TREMONT THEATRE. AlillEY, acHOEFFEL M OR^C, rrop*.      Kgn. GRAHAM CONCERT SUNDAY ftJlCHT. MONDAY, OCT. 22. WELCOME!! TTTTDQTI      time at the JDiJXDi   GRAND Ol'EKA. HOUSE. THE BOSTON BOY, CrOJE3E3>a- Z-.. Eifenings at 8. Wed. & Sat. Mats, at 2. TorinlnntaH Erciilngs 10.4G, Mittlneea iM.\ SURPRISE a PARTY,. Direct rrnm tlio Oardon TtiiMitro, K. Y, after a rim of 45!i nights, in mm & PFLUEGER'S MuRic, Soiiss, Siieclaitles, flosi tunics, Hccnory nnil Effects. -METTU'R THAN EVBIl- � Seats on nnle a week in advnnco. IK HIS NEW, .SUCCESSFUL PI,AY, A TRUE SECITKE  SKATS  STO'W. 3VO AHVANCE IST PRICES. FAREWELL. rroprlctor and Manager.....Mr. JOHN STETSOK DON'T FORGET HIWI ''Boston never likeil *Sam'l of Posen* better thnit it does noiv. Entirely rewritten-funnier ilian evex*.�'--CHobc. For a limited euf^ateeinout after several ,  years, nnUSIC HALL. Tuesday Evoiilnu, Oct. 23, and flatur-iluy Mntliion, Oct. ��. MME. MELBA, In   Two   orand  oneratlo   Cnncevtl, V/ltli tlio following artists: MMIS. SOnA SCALCln,  M.  POr.   PLASCON, M. JtAUOrERE, MMR. VAN CAU'I'KUAN unil th� MU'rHOrOLITAN OIT.UA IIOUHK ORCHESTRA. nitetttlon of AUUiiY, SCKOEFFEL �,.O.ttAU. TVESUAir ETENIN�, Oflt. �S,  ai Tho programme will consist of a mlscollaneoiis First I'avt. SECOlVn I'AKT. The 5th ftdt of Gonnod'8 Opera MAKGUHHTTR............IWIWE. �HET.'RA MEftSTOFELE.............M. Pt.ANCON FAUST..................IW. MAUOIEKIB Conductor......SIOSfOR KEvrejfANI �ATXTK�AY MATIXEE, Oct. S'T.ttt)}; Kntlre utiange ot programme,   Inclndlng.-Mad Scene from '-LUCIA" mid Bd act of "SJBMIR-AMIIJK." Keats novr on sale at Music Hall. . ' ., Sc.ile of prlccs-aa.oo, �1.C0, Sl.OO.      tt olg_ ALLBiJSTOrAGREES ON ONE THING, Mr Hoar then proceeded to make the opening statement lor the defense. He said; "If the date of the alleged promise had been fixed at any time subseouent to 1888 the court would not have allowed the case to go beyond the pleadings, for It would have been held that the promise must have been in writing. "The claim here set up is for $1B0,000, and If you find for the plaintiff at all you can only find for that sum, with interest. If she does not sustain her case the defendant is entitled to a verdict. It Is a question of $150,000 or nothing. "Very close relations existed between father and son. "In the seventies Dr Blgelow Indulged in western speculations, ao that he became flnancially embarrassed out of his own esta.te a. sum of money over $135,-OOO, and with Interest to over $160,000, which .Dr Blgelow at that time had no means to pay. "His son directed that the notes be torn up, and that he should never be asked for the money. This was at the time that the plaintiff claims that Dr Blgelow was worth 51,000,000. "An Income was also settled on him during his life, and the actual estate left by him at his death was less than $200,000, or less than the amount loaned �him by his son. "He and his son had made wills by which each provided in his will that the other should benefit by his death. In case his son did not survive him Dr Blgelow provided that the museum of Pine Arts, the college and hospital, with which he hud been connected, should be the benellclarles. "That win was made In 1882. In 18S8 he made one codicil, and In 1869 another. At one time he feared his lungs were weak. Except for that he had been a very vigorous man. He met with an accident in 1S87." "The inheritance of Dr Blgelow's son, Dr WlUiam Sturgls Blgelow, came from Ws mother, who died in 1853. The relations between the father and son were of the most cordial and affectionate nature. "They always occupied the same room since his son's boyhood, tho only time they were separated being when the son was in Europe, and another time when ho was in Jajian. "Dr Blgelow had purchased the estate in Newton and built a house there, and we shall show by the architect and others that It was built with a special care for the welfare of his son, and the alterations made therein were eug-gestcd for the purpose of making matters pleasant for his son. "It was Intended for bachelors, and it was never intended that a woman should occupy any part of It. "On July 23, 1887, he r-ocelved an In-Jury when he was out driving and fell, ln.1urlng his head. He did not feel the effects for some days,' when he began to grow unconscious, finally becoming totally BO. "His son, who was in Vienna, was cabled to, and at once set out for home. His father rallied to such an extent on his arrival that it was possible to remove him to Newton sometime about the 1st of September. "Dr Blgelow wan not able to attend to the furnishing of the house and ht^ requested yotint Dr I.iigclow to laktj charge of the furnishing of the house, which he discharted with the asalst-ance of some lady friends. "Dr Blgelow had a house at Tuclta-muck. at which i>o ladies wore vsi-.r known to go, though they Rometimes visited at his Boston and Newton houses. "After the doctor's deivth Miss Bartlett wrote to Dr Sturgls Bigelow asking an Intervlc'W. It will be shown that at that interview she made no claim as that which she now makes. Up to that tlmt! not a single member or Dr Blgelow's fiimlly. nobody cunneetr l',lgi'lovv's ineiinie Aviis lii the lusi Ml yellrt^ ot hi life? A. No. Kir. The wltiu'tis lurtlier slated In r�'ply to Mr llour Ihiit he hud r.ever known of MlsH .Uiirtlell uiilll .il'ler 1 ir liluelnw's death. 'I'lie ri'liiiuuis l.eHyeeii I >i' liljie-liiw U.IUl Ills S'.iU Wele viiy IIlleeUnuiiIe. They were iIe\'oteil to eiieh inhtr lev life. Dr hiuirivis |:|y,el.iw y.iwv U|i the nie[H;-IlI pnifeli.'.llitl wlieti lie ^I'elll (u .liipiin. "1 lumciil Ihe h(iu�e HO Ueuetui t.| ti'f r>r IMjaluw'.H jHiii. i> hile h� Wius uwav, >jy his falher'ii diieeilon," '.riie cituri ad.lourj.t'il tu IMIM u m tvulH;\, A'OXBUR \' NJiII'S, Hunt l(r(i�,lii7l 1,0 rJ7f. I'romuiit . nel mmi'dCoBtiTOWik A All Wool IMur Kibiipi liatleralnrts uuu Dm\ie;))(uiSi.O!) titiulii, al �iM�, m to il Ulciiise. Gen Putnam Mansion to be Sold. WORCESTER.Oct IS-The historic old mansion of Gen Rufus Putnam at Rutland,Mass, ! Is for sale. The owner offers the house and other farm buildings, and 150 acres connected therewith, for $4000. Persons interested are invited to meet in Rutland, Saturday, Oct 20. CTHE DRtTMlUlER UP TO DATE.) "OM> PAMU-IAK TITI>B. BUT ENTIKEl.Tr IVEW MKESS." "As the Hebrew drummer Mr Curtis li.as the oar marks of the genuine article, and nothing Is over-urawn."-Post. "He can outdo the smartest Hebrew on tho road and everybody linows It."-.Advertiser. "Ever" time Mr. Curtis spoke roars of laughter conlil be heard all over the house."-Herald. "What Penman Thompson Is in 'The Old Homestead,'and .Toseph Jetterson In 'Rip Van Winkle,' Mr. Ciirils Is in *aam'l oC Posen.' They iviu never die In the memory of the people." EVEM.'X KVENIKG AT 8. Slatinees-Wednesrtay I at S | Saturday. SUNDAY NIGHT. tt  017 GRAHAIV3 CONCERT All Roads Once Led to Rome. THEY NOW LEAD TO THE MECHANIC'S BUILDING, 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. Daily. SPECIAUFEATURES: Horns Department, Art Galleries, Erhibition HaU. BilTBr Statue of Jnstioe (Ada Kehan), ftallory. Fisheries Exhibit, Galleiy, Dairy Department, Elootrio WorMng Dairy, Easement of Exhibition Hall, Restaurant, Qallei'y, Oonoerts, Salem Cadet Band and Fadette Ladies' Orchestra, Galleries of Exhibition and Grand Halls. lUuminations at Oolumbian Exposition, Eooep-tlon Hall, Grand Hall basement (Entrance Near Staga',. TODAY-Dorchester Day. SATVltDAY-SCijde Park, Everett and Agassis; Day. ADMISSION 25 CENTS. Bags iu^ �which to carry home samples e;iven away. THURSDAY, Oct. 25,1894, VIA FITCHBURC  R.  R. AND WEST SHORE R. R., FOR THE ROUND TRIP. Leave Union Station, Boston, nt 3 P, M., Oi t. S.^^. TiolietB good rotunung niitil Oot. "U. TicketB and Sleeping Our nooorauiodutions at SbO (lud ,S00 Waililnglou Bt. Send for purtiouliiru. J, K, WATSON, B. P, A, Rtdiburg K, R, W KSSuT  (117 RAGES TODAY. r �. I 4 I*ni''''v-'i. fctM-VlCi'l'.'t U!- y '      Y "^''^^ oiuMBiA imtki mm %mmv iH't'h  v ^    ! lUtiitt i-tH'B* AMUMU^'-t ti^> 't^iUt'^il tut^ Iii'Fv.im1ii(1 ll t^U-^ -.i*^ ift tyUit-i^HtlJ^ i^lMvilAlM^ I^M-MMimtiHA H O L LIS THEATRE. 781 Washington St. and 274 Tremont St. BEGINNING liNDAY, OCT. 15, DANIEL FROHMAN'S N.Y. LYCEUM THEATRE COMPANY. FIRST TIME IN BOSTON Of Arthur W. rinero's Brilliant X'ar^lcal liomdnce, SQUARE THEATRE. Is the Best Play in Town. Matinee Tomorrow. EUGENE TOMPKINS.... Proptlotoi and MBnuger Xever has the Lvoenin company plven greater satisfaction, and 'Tli'o Anmzonn' lia-j made the bl�-geat hit of the season."-Herald, ".Kot b dull moment lu the pi ay "-Journal. "The play is a success.' -Advertiser. "A rare feast of wholesome merriment."-Globe. "The acting was a study."-Post. "Tho very best of fmi,  KxceUently �well acted and beautifully stayed."-Transcript. The action of the play bcRlns directly with the rise '�' of tho curtain at 8 o'clock, sharp. Evenings at 8 sharp.  Wed. and Sat. Matinees at '2, tf 015 Tremont Row. Open 10 tu 10. SO. Enaims Shows. fjiimbo's Goodhy The AttenAnncc Ever liicrensliie, now Averaging litilO Uiilly. It Almost Heats Ueliof. Final Days Hero of MONS. UELNO MU'fZ, NATIONAL OlOlUl, t'OUEAN WAKItlOKS, TVltOlEANOIIOIIt, TheEllUy UllOTHKUS, ISABEMA'S I'AMIU- SroUay Squsi'C.' 111,.  k�no    IB.tBtlilill a I'UnHIJl. luc.Bccs j,,y u^uj. (joimn, Sittprc Shows Hourly. '2S Bnlcrtaincra. '.IS Two rroKraminea. 5t old It nil. Day niHl Mght. PALACE  THEATRE. GEO. DIXOEM ' JOE WALCOTT roultlvoly apjHmr cac'i afternoon iintl evoninB at thn l'nlin')\ ftnil no olliur plutie. 'T MISS IT! Last Two Nights. ; Denman Thompson -ANI> TirE- EVERY SCNIUV EVKNINfl Dennian Tliompson's I\'ew Entertainment, ILLUSTRATED. jLLUMINATED. NEXT "WEBK-TUc Greateftt Bnccosi of tiio y�ar. TOMMY TOMPKINS" and Everjlhlng Else in Iiarnot ,t Thonipaon'R .Musical Fiintafly, PRINCE,.,:'r , Prloes -    10l>.,   S&u.,   SSv.,   KOC. Sunday Evening, The GREAT ^LEVY. Assooiatien Hall, Boylston and Berkeley Sts. Firat time in AMERICA, Noit Wwi., David Giirlslle 's All' t'lH-it u numlsisi Uii' nt' vvii.U' tunt innthftli' iiii>M'tt{>lv'' uiiU  lUiit >. \  ht!lil,'.l lUll'tt'^l  Ul U-, U^ I,.-. \\ ll.l. \y , tw-. (!�� .**�mikti.fti\ .�tcl'U'-* iv-Uifc^ll \'M'^\       '"ili ^.-U* Keniiebeo Steantboii Go II, U Ik """Y,Wll',"�\"'^^" TEM 118th Performances This Week! "NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS." "TOMMY TOMPKINS, HOW 0' VEOOP" tt piti COLUMBIAISL UUUI    UAHUls and I I I'l'inirietiirit i^n^ CU.Mil.i;* KlUmSl.lN, l......i     M�lll4!�lli t,.A.M-r  TItltKKS   . \ liv-U St'.tl \ ^.1 llti' |,i,iv llii.s (';m,:lu lUl iiu�(t,u \vith THE IVIAN FROW8 THE WEST, lull   \'t    lMitlL;hn
    ,,i.i ir,,.� mlili^ OW A^D 'tUy* tU'�Vt iNhV.V^Uv (�! , ^�-.a^i Mfl.t." .tt'�' I'UHU- t'haJt'i . t i ii Ut,;.( t v,�?. mm\ K.^ruKu �oxii>;irr \, ii ��|. 1:1. ,.,^ ,.. y M. h� Hl� .,1 11 ,\a l.t.'liiil ( tllU LYCEUM (ft ti.t.|i>x DRAG RIDES. *4u�*' V 'i \H k*"?! TODAY .V;

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