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Boston Daily Globe: Friday, June 22, 1894 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - June 22, 1894, Boston, Massachusetts                                The success of a fiaper depends largely �poii the number of readers it can command^ and in 'this i'espeei The Globe is the recognised Ifaderin Boston. -[Profitable Advertising. ctote. The success of a paper depends largely upon the number of readers it can command, and in this respect The Globe is the recognized leader in Boston. -[Profitable Advertising. VOJ. XLV-^NO 173. BOSTON. FRIDAY  MORNING, JUNE 22, 1894-TEN PAGES. PRICE TWO CENTS. Beware of the iVIan WHO OPPBES TOU A SUBSTITUTE FOE WHO SAYS HE HAS SOMETHrM JUST AS GOOD. % H8 CHEATS YOU ON MOXfE Ha'il Cheat You on Anything Else. (Set STRAIGHT MOXIE direct from the bottle at all SODA FOUNTAINS. Allow No Adulteration I Accept No Substitute I Insist upon liaving MOXIE.. It has a WORLD-WIDE REPUTATION.  It is a DELICIOUS AND HEALTHFUL BEVERAGE.  It is the only preparation upon the market which directly nourishes the nervous system. KOLB BY ALL BELIABLJE DMUGGISTS AUTD GROCEBS. MOXIE NERVE FOOD CO., Boston and Lowell. Mass. M THE FIRST BEfiREE. Mrs Halliday Found to Be Guilty of Murder. Jury Were Out Three Honrs and 10 Minutes Considering tlie Case. .�yerdiot to be Pronounoed This Mornins: -Prisoner Unaffected. MONTICEI.LO, N Y, June 21-Con-rtferary to general expectations, the jury '': la the case o� Mrs Halliday, who had 1 been on trial here for the past five days. brouBht In a verdict at 4.40 p ra today of tourder In the first degree. They were out three hours and 10 minutes. After the verdict had been announced !ftho Jury was polled and all answered In toe affirmative. As the woman's counsel had nothing ifto say to the verdict, the Judge an-iftounoed that he would pronounce judg-/'inent on the prisoner at 9.30 a m to-ttiorrow. The prisoner did not seem to be af-ifeoted by the verdict. When she was 'tirought Into court her cheeks were Jfflushed. When she was told to stand Mp and face the jury she did bo upon (jfcelng raised by the constable in charge. After the verdict had been rendered, ind she had taken her seat, she tried :o put her foot on a chair in front of ler several times. ^IRE IN THE HEART OF LONDON. iTwenty Commercial Houses and Factories Destroyed In the Finsbury DIs-trlot-Loss About $1,250,000. LONDON, June 21-Plre did about !;!U,250,000 worth of damage In the Flns-Viry district this evening. Twenty |.*ommerplal houses and factories were i'Hestroycd. ; Fifty'fire engines were called out, but (mil could not work to advantage on ac-i-ccunt of the narrowness of the streets.  Had the firemen not been troubled at �.-every turn by lack of room, they could have saved half the buildings. Virtually' the whole section bounded %y Castle, Leonard and Tabernacle sts �nd City road was destroyed. OAUGHT A OCXEIOUS PISH. fJNavy Yard Clerks Enjoy an OuttoR on the Iwaua. The clerks and heads of departments at the navy yard had their annual outing yesterday. The U tj tug Iwana was nlaoed at their disposal by Com Fj*e, and they organized a fishing Darty and an excursion "was made to Minot's light. There were nnmerous invited suests, including a German band, and the whole party numljered �about 100. Off Minot's light a number of lines, with Hhe latest improved tackle and most seduo-' tive bait, were cast overboard.  Scnlpiu after Houlpln was hauled lu, and alter much patient angling and continuous baiting, a cod was captured. Tliis was followed ty several more cod, and E. 0. Baxter ! caught a fish of unusual appearance. One '.of the bluejackets volunteered the intorma-�'tlonthatit was one of the sheep's head i�pocies. It was the largest fish caught, and ' lyeighed npv.urd of 20 poundB. Anol)or was weighed about noon and a leruise about the lower harbor was made lor a few hours, during which dinner was eerved and the band played more music. The party arrived at tlie yard about 7. WAKTS GLAJDSTOME'a SEAT. ' JMldlothian Idberals Nominate Sir Thomas Carmichael. EDINBURG, Juno 21-Sir Thomas David ! . ri.. the leading family, farming and horse paper in >>ew lingland. Rochester Brewing Co's popular "Stand ard" beer in bottles at the "pops."      , mm Police Made War on the Tape Telegraph, Machines are Called Gaming Deyices. Removal Ordered by Commissioners. Lesees in Dark as to Their Motive. Controlling Company to Make Defense. Stock Market Quotations and News Stopped. New Feature of tlie Moi Jm SweeplnrBostoii. Boston's moral wave Is nearlng high water mark. The police, who have been scouring the dark places of the town for three weeks, have the task first allotted them well under way, and are now casting about for new worlds to conquer. The latest evidence of ofllcial activity is an order sent out from headquarters, which is to the effect that all stock and news tickers must be removed from hotels and restaurants. Keepers of those places, as well as the Stock Quotation Telegraph company, are wondering at It all. The first heard of the order was when the officers of station 2, acting under orders of Capt Pierce, called at nil the saloons and hotels In the district that used the tickers and notified the proprietors that ' the tickers must be removed at once. Those who remonstrat-,ed and asked questions were simply told that that was the order, and that was all the officers knew about it. Capt Pierce was uncommunicative on the auWeot. He didn't wish to discuss it. It is known, however, that he sent for the manager of the Stock Quotation Telegraph company the other night and discussed with him the question as to whether the ticker was not a device for gambling. How people could gamble with a tidier was not clear to D. J. Ahern, the manager, and the courts will no doubt be asked to decide the question. The first thought of the removal of these machines originated with the police commissioners. The Stock Quotation telegraph company expended over $10,000 to get ready for business in Boston, The matter furnished on their ticker tape consists of European cables of foreign markets and exchanges, giving the current rates ot exchange, foreign and domestic prices of money loans, and the tone of the foreign coffee, cotton and other markets. It also gives the bank statement, clearing house statement, railroad earnings, horse racing, baseball, yachting and other sporting events of interest to the up-to-date American citizen. During elections the ticker records the downfall of aspiring politicians, the defeat of good or indlfterent measures, and the names of those fortunate enough to land In office. It also inks out in good, big English the current news, tells what Is going on In Washington, whether or not Pe�-fer's whiskers happen to be osc/llatcd by the passing breezes and all about the sugar trust. A reporter yesterday went over the ground covered by dlntrlcts 2 and 4, where over 60 tickers have been In operation. Finding one that had not yet been cut out, the lessee not having been notified, the reporter began to read. The first Item on the tape was dated Washington, and read like this: "Amount of free gold held by the treasury $66,423,623, against $08,'13'1,4'13 yesterday," Not perceiving any chance to gamble with Uncle Sam's wealth, the reporter pulled the tape along between his finger and thumb and read on. The next item was dated New York, and told how the North American's annual report was to be Issued, and that the company had partially extricated itself from its old entanglements. The next item was all the way from Chicago, and sounded mournful. It read: "Mercury 95� above; cloudy; wind west." Looking for opportunity to tiirn a dollar by-dallying with chance, was discouraging. Even if an Itpin should come out of the cogs that Nabochllsh by Smithereens out of Soccaloxis was dead sure to win the Derby, how could a cent be gambled, on the result in the place where the ticker was? Something whispered: "Uun to the place where they sell pools." 'And does that make the ticker a de-|*vice for gambling?" asked the reporter. That's what the police say," said that something. 'Then," asked'the reporter,"why isn't a telegraph or a telephone apparatus, that tells the same things, devices for gambling?" That something scratched its head reflectively, and was silent. The ticker was busy, clicking fitfully and turning out the events of the day at the rate of 80 words to the minute. Grasping the tape again the reporter read on. The next item had come all the way from London under the yeasty waves, and was to the effect that money at 12.30 o'clock was at one-half percent rate of discount In the open market. Further along on the tape was another item from Chicago. It gave the receipts on hogs, and spoke ot the outlook for Texan cattle. Following this was the announcement that the steamer Sophie had arrived in New York. Then followed Items on corn and wheat, and quotations on some gilt edge stocks. Another Item with a New Y'ork date said that whisky had been attacked Vy Cam-mack, but failed to say who got the best of the scrap.     _        i The reporter visited several places where the machines were rented, and proprietors considered the order arbitrary, and did not know why the machines were ordered out. Most of the hotels In the two districts were without them, as the keepers of these places dislike anything that will attract or keep a crowd of men standing about In the corridors or bar. In several saloons the proprietors had sent requests to the company to have the machines taken out, as the police objected to them. The manager of the company, whose office is In the Equitable building, was dumbfounded when Informed of the action of the police. "Such an order," said Mr Ahern, "would ruin our business. I do not care to say much about the matter now. I have employed cot;nseI, and the court will decide whether or not news and stock tickers are devices for gambling." One of the prominent brokers of State st, who depends a great deal on the ticker for financial use, was asked If he ever heard of the machine being classed with Implements or devices for gambling. He asked: "How about the stock exchange, and the offices of brokers and bankers?" The reporter was unable to answer the question. At the Tremont house the patrolman who gave notice to remove the ticker, which is connected with a brokerage office doing business in the hotel, was told that the ticker would not be removed until specific directions from the station house had been received. I HEADQUARTERS | I DUCK  ' TROUSERS. iTJieWm.H.RjcliardsonCo. OUTFITTERS, ^385 WASHINGTON STREET.' FIFTY YEARS' SALE," Cutler's Vegetable Pulmonary IBalsam -Allen & Co., Cinn., O. 50c. andgi. FRIDAY, 22 [The limp bbowB wliere the tboe DOLLS. sample lot at about half price. Win.H. Brtne,1 Tremont St. Part XIV of the Century War Book describes the battles of Vlcksburg.Chlck-amauga and Chattanooga. Written by the men who fought the battles. Parts I to XIV at Room 6, Globe Building. MELROSE  WOT THE MAN. Was Arrested In Boston on Suspicion of Being a Murderer. TROY, N Y, June Si-Frank Hose, ,illas Melrose, arrested Monday in Boston on suspicion of being one of the murderers of David Kitohio at Troy, and who was brought to this city last night, was dis charged from cu.stody today. Person-s who saw the murderers flee from the scene of the critno are positive that Rose Is not one of them. THE WEATHER, FAIR WASHINGTON, June 21 - Forecast for Friday: For New England and eastern New Y'ork, generally fair, south to southweste rly winds, probably slightly warmer in the vicinity ot Portland. Local Forecast. For New England, Friday: Generally fair, slightly warmer, southwest winds. Synopsis: Generally fair weather, little change In temperature, except warmer In the northwest. J. W. Smith, Local Forecast Ofllcial. The Temperature Yesterday as indicated by the thermometer at Thompson's spa: 3 a m 67�, 0 a m 08�, 9am 70�, 12 m 86=", p m fi", � p m 84�, 0 p in 73=, 12 mid 60�. Avcriige temperature yesterday 74 2-21�. BY ACCLAMATION. California Bepublioans Nominate a Lieutenant Governor. SACRAMENTO. Call, Juno 21-Tbe republican state convention today nominated B, G. Millard for lieutenant governor by acclamation. Another Rival for Brecklnrldeo. LEXINGTON, Ivy, June 21-Charle3 Cbilton Moore, editor of the pi'ohibition paper, the Blue Grass Blade, announced hlm.self tonight a probibition candidate for congres.s from tlie 7lh dictriot. He declares that be can beat Breckinridge, Owen or Settle, but as he is an avowed non-believer in the Chvistian religion the good people of the district are not apt to vote for him. TAN SHOES Are Quite the Thing for Summer Wear. Oyr $3, S4 & $5 lines FOR MEN Cannot Be Equalled. Hatliaway,SDUle& Harrington, 35 BOYLSTON ST., Between Wasiiinirtcm sad Tremont Btreeti. F. E. LOVEJOY, Manager. inmi; .G IM Meigs Bill the Text of Angry Senators. Cronan Defends the House Action. Kittredge Argues on Legal Points. Faults of the Measure Fully Exposed. Fitzgerald Explains Wiiy He Ciianged His Views. Senate Adjourns Before Debate Ends. House Clears Its Caleiiiar of m All Business. When the senate ad.|ourned at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon the fight on the amendments offered to the bill to Incorporate the Boston elevated railway company (Meigs system) was fairly under way. Mr Cronan ot SufCoIk, who led off In favor of the bill, had spoken for nearly two hours, and the time remaining was taken up wholly by Senators KUtredge and Fitzgerald, also of Suffolk. The latter, at the time ot adjournment, was In the midst ot a fiery argument In favor of the bill. It was nn argument which bristled and blazed with personalities, so marked and pointed as to make his hearers lose sight, almost, for a time, of the main Issue, in view of the Individual en counter. Twice had; Mr Kittredge, the senator attacked, attempted an Interruption by rising, at first to an explanation, and again to a question of pi-lvllege, and Anally I'rea Butler himself Interposed with a mild reprimand, but the declaration had been made, and there, with expectation at fever heat, the senate adjourned. Before the speochmaking began an avalanche of amendments had poured in to the clerk, and were offered in due form, the principal ot which follow: By Mr Kittredge of Suffolk-Upon the filing of a petition to the superior court, in any county, by any person, under the provisions of this section, said court shall, 1� requested by the petitioners, require said company to furnish seourity satisfactory to said court for the payment of all damages and costs which may be awarded to said petitioner; and all the rights of said corporation to construct, use or operate a road upon or In front of the premises of said petitioner shall be suspended until It furnishes the security required. That no bonds shall be issued in excess of the capital stock actually paid in. That the company shall not sell or dispose of its bonds for less than par value. Require the permission of the mayor and aldermen In cities and selectmen in towns for the establishment of locations. To strike out the provisions for stations in Adams sq and .Scollay eq, and an elevated passageway In Brattle sL By Mr Durant of Middlesex-That the corporation shall pay the expense of rebuilding or repair of bridges or highways rendered necessary b.y the railway. By Mr Banger of Suffolk-Providing that bonds may not bo Issued for debts due to any person or corporation contracted prior to the passage of the act. That the road shall not run on Tremont st between Tremont row and Beacon St. That damages to property taken under right of eminent domain .shall be a first lien upon the corporation's property and franchise. By Mr Burnham of Suffolk-That the company shall pay an annual license ot $1000 for every mile of single track laid through the streets of this city, and an annual tax of ^GflO for each mile of track laid In other cities and towns. By Mr Gray of Norfolk-That In towns in which it is proposed to operate the road, locations shall be determined upon by the voters at a town meetltig, and not by a majority of boards of selectmen. By Mr Bcssom of Essex-Strike out of the damage clause all reference to benefits which It is alleged will accrue to estates in consequence of the building of the road. By Mr Merrill of Norfolk-A line from Fields Corner to Neponset bridge. By Mr Frothlnghara of Essex-Prohibiting the company from using the Manhattan system in operation in New York. By Mr Swallow of Suffolk-That the proposed act shall not become operative until accepted by the voters of Boston at a special or regular election. That locations mu.st be approved by the mayor and a majority of aldermen. By Mr Blanchard ot Suffolk-That the mayor and aldermen of cities and selectmen of towns may Impose conditions of location, Including compensation for use of streets, and that grants of location may be revoked after 20 years and striiflure removed. That the routes shall be definitely fixed within st.'C months after the passage of the aft. That all lofatlons shall be revoked upon applicailon ot a city or a town in case of failure to make the deposit required In section 12 within the time specified. Mr Cronan ot Suffolk, in speaknlg to these amendments,fiald that for 14 years Boston has suffered the Inconveniences of an Inadequate tystein of transit, and during all that time there has been an agitation for improved facilities. As a result of this agitation there is a conviction In the minds of the people that only an elevated railroad can solve the problem. This Is undeniable. As to how it should be constructed, there are but two conoiuslona: It must either be built by the municipality or by private capital. At this period It would be unwise to commit the city to any such a principle. The objections to mu-nloipul control of the road weigh against It with such force that the plan is generally regarded as unsafe and unsound. He continued: "It is conceded by all that the bill before the senate will solve the question, the only difference being upon the construction ot certain sections of the measure. "The sole objection lies In the alleged fact that the property owners along the route of the proposed road are not protected against damages which may result to their estates. ."As a representative of the people, and guarding solely their interests, he was prepared to say that the rights of property owners were secured under the bill. _ Mr Cronan yielding, Mr M6nk of Plymouth offered nn amendment to so ohiinge the bill that the incorporation may only construct a road on the Meigs system, in Btoad of giving them the right to use any sy.stem. Resuming, Mr Cronan charged that the wealthy classes had employod counsel to oome to the state house to olMtruot the pa.s-eago of the bill and frustrate the will of the people. Mr Kittredge asked if the franchise of the oomoany was mortgagoa for $20,000,000, with only $10,000,000 oapital.and the mortgage foreclosed, what there was to secure property owners for damages which they may sustain. Mr Cronnn answered that i� the road bo came defunct, property ownor-i could petition to have tlie road declared a nuisance, and It could then be removed or doatroyed. Mr Kittredge maintained that the New York & Now England rnllroad, though mortgages on the system wore closed, was running under rooeivors. and wanted to know why it would not bo possible for the proposed road to bo operated in the same manner. Mr Cronan read from the statutes and the bill to provo that by a distress warrant property owners could secure compensation. The oquity powers of the court could bo invoked and rid the public streets of a nuisance if such itshouldbe declared to bo Mr Kittredge then inquired out of what property would the warrant ot distress bo satisfied fn case of the foreclo.iuro of the first mortgage of $20,000,000 issued on �10,000,000 of stock. Mr Cronan said that oven under that aa-Bumptlon property owners still have roaort to the courts, which have the power to say that If tbo judgment is not paid the road shall bo destroyed. Mr Kittredge asked it this did not apply to an injunction upon tho company and not upon tho structure which causes the damage. Mr Cronan said that if at the expiration ot 30 days any judgment was not paid, tho rights granted the oomoany would be ron derod null, and a suspension of tho road would result. Mr Milton of Middlesex desired to know where in the bill there was anything to iU' dicate that locations in tho city of Boston would bo fixed within any specified time, since, under the provisions of the bill, tho company must agree to all locations. Mr Cronan replied that location must be established within two years and six months. To this Mr MlUon replied tliat the, time dated from tho ttiipUoation o� tho road for a location, and the road might never make an application, Mr Sanger ot Suffolk asked if. under the terms of the bill, the company could not delay building tho road 2n years. Mr Cronan's answer was that tho company would not dare to do such a thing. Harvard Men Pozzlod by His Curves. Only Four Hits Made in ]?fine Innings. Yale Won First Kame of Series 5 to 1. Highlands Did Good Work in the Box. Rochester Brewing Go's extra dark Bavarian beer, in bottles, at the "pop" concerts. Mr Kittrodore followed Mr Gronnii, and said that ho proposed to discu.'is tlio question fairly, and it seemed to bini that the bill could be so amended as to reflect credit on the legislature-amendments which would protect and not rob tho people. Ho represented a district more iutorogted than any other district-a district containing over 75 percent of the growth ot tho city during tho past years. Ho had reproBonted that difitrict for five years, during which time he gave much ot the best o� his life to a consideration of the transit problem. Ho had alwayswanted an elevated railroad, and he wanted it today, but he wanted a bill In which the rights of all citizens were secured and protected. The people wanted rapid transit, and ho would not dare to oppose it. Ho had no change of heart,nogreat light out of tho hoavons had converted lilm. Ho did not go to Chicago with tho rapid transit committee and write to tho mayor of Boston, as did onosoniitor, to inform him (the mayor) that it lie would retrain from appointing assistant assessors in his ward tliat he (the senator) would boom the subway. "The bill before tho senate i.i not an honest one," bo continued. "It docs not contain one element of rapid transit, but is purely a speculative soboino, calculiited to enrich a few men, who di'Sive to fiood tho market with worthless stock. '"I'lioy wore Inaliiooro, a.s was shown In tho amendment which autlinrizos the incorporation to ii.sd any systoiii in coUHtruot-ing tho road. This they iillowod, aiirt it was it stab in tlui heart of Mr Mnigs, who had laid his head upon ilioir breast.'' Ho denounced tho bill as drawn primarily for the purpoito of extorting inontiy from Boston peoulo. Its very wording shows this to be true. Referring to tho incorporators of the p'n-po.sed road, Mr Kittredge dwelt upon tlioir respective financial ability, declaring that they wore not rtien ot that character and financiiil standing in whom one would repose so groat a trust as that which is involved in the bill. He did not stigmatize any of the centlo-moii named In tho nicisure, but laid especial emphasis on their apparent inability to carry out and consummate so stupendous an enterprise. In its present form tho bill is dishonest to the people, dishonest to tlio city, dishono.st to the people who may purchuse stock and dishoneftt to the rapid transit. It is not only a novelty, but it is a monstrosity in legislature. Ho affirmed that the republican patty Couttuu�d on tUo Hixtli l*aue. We take a junt prltle tu Ijeliii; ublit to olu-r to our cufiionieis tho Buckcve MuH'ine Macliiiie, Chumpiou Iloi-iio Uuy Kniic, ICuliiird's Huy ToiliJer, becAUfcft lliefic nmchliic-a are iinlvprfiiilly lu-Ki-.ovs-l-odyed to be une([iUiU< JMi'i.irnv, LluirrSEfib OF iKtMT.irr am- i xr km lslk ,k � uuk, bcHl -e Itelng t'BIieclailymliiptoU Ki Now Kiiulund list-. Ilayinff iinrt otlifcr liti';:f m;i,iili,cr> stild oii eusy terms-oioullily iniymeittB if cifauyO.. IIAV CAIS Irt'iiueiitly eiwe tiietr cost the tirtt vear. We have an Imineiisf stoik of II.Wl^'G TOOLS of every deacrlptiou; rejiulr inecea ami EVJBKiTIIIXtl   FOK FAKM, G.VIJDEX A-\D LAWX. At X*ow�8( J*rlcc8, M'liol�fini(.iu]ftil WataSX. CATALOtilE MAILLU FEKi:. JOSEPH 6RE0K & SONS, (COUrOBATlON.; �7 to S4 KovlU Market street, Boatou. His Support Was Not Wliat Had Been Expected. Many Glaring Errors Helped Lose Game. Weill's Great Irow to tie Plate was a Feature. The Yale and Harvard baseball nines met on Holmes field, Cambridge, yesterday aftei-noon, for the first time this season, and the Tale men left the field victorious by the score of 5 runs to 1. Harvard was badly defeated, and deserved to be, for the visitors outplayed tho home team at every point. The game was slow and tedious, and even the most enthusiastic iindergr.adu-ate found diftlculty In arousing enthusiasm In himself or his neighbors. The Harvard supporters were massed back of third base, and did more or less cheering during the afternoon, but there were so few chances for Harvard cheers that the men did not become very honj-se. Yale was represented by a small group near first base. The victory of the Yale nine was due almost entirely to the-splendid pitching of Carter, who was evidently "on his muscle," and determined to give a good account ot himself. Harvard made only four hits, and these were scattered through tho nine innings. It was tho poorest batting the home team has done for many a day, and 10 men struck out Numerous others had two Coiitlnuorl  3i tlin Second Pafce* Creates a Good Appetite a good appotlto is eBscntlnl to good health, ant when tho notiiral desire tor food ts gone strongtli will Boon fall, just a3 the are becomes low when tho fnel .apply Is out off. For loss ot appotlto, IjidlgcBtlon, sick headaoho and other tronbiet ol a dyspeptic nature HOOD'S Sarsapariila l3 tho remedy whloU moRt certainly ourea. Vk gontly tones tho stoinacli, nsalsta dtgestlon and innkcB ono "real hungry." Persons In dellcata health, nftor tfiklng Hooti'A aavaapariUa a fow days, ihid themselves able to oat tho plalneat food with unoxpcctotl relish. Be aure to ge6 HOOD'S and only HOOD'S Hood's Pills ai'o purely vegtHablo, hand made perrot!t In piojiortlon and nppf^iu'ance. The love of the shapes and forms of a century ago lias been but half satisfied by the rickety old furniture in the second-hand shops. It delights the eye, liut cannot be commonly used on account of its decrepitude. Tliis year we liave iiiade some perfect reproductions of the more famous Colonial pieces, accurately preserving their every detail, even to the antique coloring of the wood. Here, for example, are some old flag-bottomed dining chairs, which not only delight the eye, but they can he used by the present generation. They are more comfortable than any modern frames, and the cost is about half the price charged for rickety "antiques." There can be no pride or sentiment surely in the ownership of the antiquated furniture of some-one-else's family. Its only value is its historic shape, and this is far better reflected in our exact copies of famous originals. And at half the cost! Ml Fiiitiire Co. 48 CANAL ST. {T^MiT 28 C5C   

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