Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - June 21, 1894, Boston, Massachusetts                                1 r     ' I wi^ �OR RESULTS! 1.1   ii I.'' ..... ATo mewspaper in Boston brings larger returns to advertisers than The Globe. JTo newspaper in Boat&n brings larger returns to ctd" vertisera than Tlie GMhei VOL XLV-NO 172. BOSTON, THURSDAY  MORNING JIJNE 21, 1894-TEN PAGES^ PRICE TWO CENTS. 500 Secfind-Hand Wheels Wanted Best GhanGe of the Year to Secure the Latest Model High Grade. Weoffer the94 NEW MAILS as Finest HisK Cradeever put on the American market, and the heavy demand attests Us popularity and appreciation, DBT" Desiring: for our Second-hand Department second-hand wheels of standard makes we offer now to take such and allow more than usual price in trade for NEW MAILS.   . Send full description of your wheel, statingmake, tires, condition and your estimate of value and secure a NEW MAIL. Must apply at Olice, as this offer will be rescinded after a limited number is reached. i^cAdxresist   3\Xa>xiL-u.fci,ot'ux'ex't3� WM.READiSONS,107WashingtonSt., Boston mn IN THE AIR. Sioux City Swept by Wind, Hail and Rain. ^CICA^ �.h"^        ��!..���� 20,060,000''"--"" *w|w.vyjwyw e.ooriiiy increasing HYISlEiylAN BROS,, Sole New.'England Agenti, 18 ka 80 Post Offloo Sqnan, Top of tlie Union Station lifted and Cydorama Wreded. Streets Pilled Witli Hyine; Debris and Orops Mowed Bown. SIOUX CITY, June 20-A storm of wind, rain and hall struck this city at S a m today. Th? roof of the Illinois Central station was carried over the union depot, and dropped Into 3d st. The Paavy & Stevens wholesale furniture house was also unroofed, and the Gettysburg cyclorama was wrecked. For 45 minutes the air was Bp full of flyingr debris that it was not safe to be on the streets. The wind was followed by 10 minutes of hall and rain. The streets were badly washed out, and the corn crop in the vicinity suffered. It is believed that great damage was done In the surrounding country.; SOLD BY AI.Ii DEALERS. ALDRICH $AYg IT IS FALSE, Denies That He Is or Has Been Under Obligations, Directly or Indirectly, to Any Sugar Trust Official. �WASHINGTON, June 20-A statement published in a New York newspaper this mprnlng- intimated that Senator Aldrlch of'.Rhode IslaniJ was, or had been, under such finanolal oblig-atlons to the American sugar refining company, or some of Its officers, as might affect or control his ofBcial action upon legislation. Senator Aldrlch today said the article was false and villainous in its insinuations. Ha stated that he was not and never had been under the slightest possible financial or other obligations, directly or indirectly. Immediate or contingent, to Mr Searles or to any other person who bad ever been connected with the Busar refining company. SHATTERED WOODWORK. Severe Elleotriaal Storm Flays the Misohlef , at Bjiddeford, BIDOTIFOIID, June 20-During a severe electrical storm this afternoon the residence of Thomas W. Goodwin,, on Kossuth St, was struck by lightning. Mr and Mrs .Goodwin were in the house at the time, but were not injured. IThe boitoame In at the attic window, tore off the plastering in several rooms and shattered the woodwork. At West Soarboro, a small village Ave Wiles from this city, the storm was one of the most severe for a number gt years. The rain poured in torrents, badly washing out the highways in difCcrejit pectlons of the vllage. The crop,s were badly tiamaged by the heavy rain fail. Bteamer Neath Abbey Wreolted. LONDON.June 20-The steamer Neath Ablrey of Swansea, has been wrecked gff Nash point. Four of her crew, Including the captain, were drowned. Part XIV of the Century War Book describes the battles of Vfcksburg.Chlck-amauga and Chattanooga. Written by the men who fought the battles. Parts I to XIV eit Room 6, Globe Building. THE  WEATHEB. FAIR WASHINGTON, June 20 - Forecast for Thursday: For New England and eastern New York, generally fair, south or southwesterly winds. . Local i'orecast. For New England Thursday; Fair weather except possibly light scattered Showers in parts of Maine and New Hampshire, southwest winds, slight changes m temperature, Continued high temperatures in nearly all sections and scattered light rains, The western storm has moved north to Manitoba, �Vnd Is apparently diminishing in force. J. W. Smith, Local Forecast Official. I ARCTIC EXPLORERS. I In olden times they used to hang; the butter down the well, but today no house Is complete without a first., class Refrlgeretor. We have every style and size to select from. Refrigerators Baby Carriages, .m $ ij .00 Down and Per Week Carpets and Oil Cloths NONE WILL VOU BETTER lASy PAYMENTS. G. H. Robinson & Go, 1 & 2 Dock Si|. & 140 Washington St. TLllinoniiV , t'I'o (Itli for oo'iirliuieiils 18 to THUndUft'(i�ldi�culp;ii.j Baby Carriages, $8.50 luid Bjnvnrat  Loweti  jirlcei In Win. H.BrlR8,1TreinontSt. 21 The Temperfttijro Yesterday. ftB indicated by the thermometer at Thomp. son's Bpa; 3 a in 71�, (Jam 71�, (lam 7.'J�, 12 m 7^�, 3 p m 81�, 6pm 7fl", 9pm 72^ I'i mid 07�. Average temporaturp yester-day 74 4-21�. PEPPEiEED WITH BUCKSHOT. Indian Territory Outlaw Shot While Lyine in Wait to Bob. MUBKOQEB,. I T, June SO-Sunday night Jim Cook, his brother and another person wore lying in wait at the halt-way house between Tahlequah and Wagoner to capture tlie Cherok(;e monny In transit between Tahiequah and Wagoner, where it is being taken for the payment at Vtnitit, which began this morning. Some one notified the treasurer and he sent a SQuad of the National duard ahead of the money. They surrounded the house and In the fight that ensued one of the guards was killed and one of the bandits shot, The robbers escaped, but were followed and yesterday some of the deputies from the Muskogee court brought In Tom Cook. He was shot in both arms and through the body and peppered all over with buckshot, He says he and the others had been to Tahlequah to draw their money and were attacked before they were aware. They belong to the famous gang of outlaws who have been terrifying the western portion of this nation for years. SHELL WOHKER AHRBSTBD. He Was Fleeoiue 3aU Gome Patrons by the Little Ball and Three Shells. John Burns, an alleged cropk from New York, was arrested on Congress St, near the baseball grounds, yesterday afternoon upon the charge of working the shell game. Inspector Knox watched the man at work for some time, and, as he says, "I saw him win lots of money from the suckers." Then he arrested Bums. Burns said that he had been working the races In Providence and only arrived in Boston yesterday morning. He was committed to the city prison and will be arraigned In the municpal court todai\___ DEGREE GIVEN TO MAHAN. Oomtnander of the OIucbeo Entertained With Honors at Oxford. LONDON, June 20-The university of Oxford, at Its commemoration festival today, c�nferred the honorary degree of D C L upon Capt Alfred T. Mahan, commander of the U S cruiser Chicago. The oration conferring the degree was ' delivered in Latin, and  the exercises closed   with   great   enthusiasm.    Capt Mahan was afterward  entertained at luncheon by the fellows of All Bonis college.___ CONTENTS OF TODAY'S GLOBE. Patte 1. Italian slashed by a woman at the North end. , Fight on the Melgts bill beuina In'the senate; Bell bill passes both hoftses; otherleg-islative mattery, Sioux City swept by storms. Harvard and Yale eights row over the fou>mlle course on time. Senator Butler calls Gov TlUmati a liar to his face. Thieves ransack a Somerville house while five men look on. Colored boy\ whipped to death In a New Jersey town. Aldrlch denies that he Is conneoted with sugar trust officials. Unknown man ground to pieces by the Ghost train. Pase le. Boston team $aved from defeat by Duffy's home run In the ninth; otherna-tional league games. Bangor whitewashed by Portland; other New England league games. Bulclde of Dr Qrover at Canarsie, N T, PaffO 3. Trotting at Mystic and Lawrence. Still further muddle In the matter of settling up Moody Merrill's estate. First day's running at Shoepsliead Bay. PbKo *. Passage at arms between Dr Newell and Alderman Lee In pubUo institutions Investigation. South end residents object to a reducing plant. Page S, Brayton-FUnt nuptials at Fall Rlverj other weddings. Notorious Harry HiU on the witness stand before the Iiexow committee in New York. Ohio coal strike ended. Four lives lost In a burning mine. Commencement exerolaes at Tufts and elsewhere. Pane o. Opening of Massaobusetts Sons of Vet' erans' convention at Pittsfiold. Summer stage offerings, Organisation of RadcIiSe oollege being perfected. Joyful din greeted the new Bangor boat's arrival down east, Pane t. Over SS,OOp,000 expended on Boston streets (luting the past year. Yesterday's transactions in finanoialiand oommerolal marts. Thayer momorial library dedicated at Uxbridge, SenB!�tloual eviction at Amosbury. PaKe 8. Change lit manner of entering foreign vessels at the custom house. Pad* O. Important anotion sales of horses and PoKB 10. Spat between  (Senators  Allen and Chandler. Income tax booked for today. Morrison I. Swift talks about tbe visit of the induBtrialp to Washington. Master's decision in tba Sprlngfleld yos pel teat case. Atchison plan of reorganization. Ball in aid of Fourth of July fund in Maiden. Another shooting affray over the A. P. A.______ CALLED TILLMAN A LIAR. South Carolina's Fire Esitltig Governor Sat Immovable While Senator Butler Gave Him a Drubbing.  ' COLUMBIA, S-G,"*mB^-20^At the Chester campaign meeting today Senator Butler gave Gov Tillman the most terrillc drubbing he has yet received, Tillman made one of ijis characterlS" tic speeches against Cleveland, congress and the money power. ; He declared that the democratic party was rotten, and avowed that he would go to the senate armed with a pitchfork with which he would prod Cleveland. Senator Butler replied and at once began to hit hard. "Yesterday at York," said the senator, "Gov TlUman put an insult upon my character that I permit no man living to do without resenting. "Gov Tillman charged, or, rather, in a meaner way than that, by Insinuation, Inuendo and suggestion Intimated, that I had a corruption fund from Wall St or elsewhere with which to buy my seat in the senate, I oan say in reply that he or any other man who says so is an Infamous liar." The governor sat Immovable, and Gen Butler went on: "When he has charges to make against me as a mar. or a senator let him come like a mah of courage and truth, and not indulge in the action of a blackguard. Gov TlUman may go to the senate, but he shall not go there slandering me." Both Crews Row Over the Thames Course. Yale's   Eeported Time, 22m 48s. Steamer's Swell Holds Them Back. Harvard's Time Eight Seconds Faster. tlie Crimson. "Bob" Cook Wears That Troubled Look. Pets Saii to Have laJe Priress Bactwait LOBUTBR SMACK SUNK. Finest draught" beer in Anierioa sold at the "pop" couc'jrtsi. It is the Kocbcster JSrewIug Co's Babeuilan. Wb" Run Into by Steamer "STarmoiith- Cape Condon Lost. PORTLAND, Mo. Juno zn-News was received by W, B.Jordan Jfe Oo.this morning, that ilio lob.stor sinuck Monterey of this citywa.'j sunk today by the Btoamer Yarmouth, off Yftrmoutli, N S. Oapt William Condon wns lost and the crow, numbering two men, were saved. A thick fog is assigned an the cause of the accident. Capt Condon bolongod to rricndship. Me, where ho was a well-known citizen, having served as fieh wmden and held other official positions. Ho leaves a family. Ho caught at a lobster crate at the time the vessel foundered, but let go and was lost. It is thought that he might have received a blow at the time the smaok was struck. When you come down town today call at Rooms 6 and 13, Globe Bulldine, for your Portfolios. O, K.  ORADUATES DLNW. Harvard Men from 69 to 04 Enjoy a Banquet. A social reunion of the O. K. club of Harvard college, the senior literary society, toolf place at Parker's last evening, with nearly 50 members present. Mr J. L. Oliver, president of the society, was in the chair. A banquet preceded the evening's entertainment, Among those present were representatives from nearly every graduating class since 1858. Piscataquis Republicans Named. DOVKH, Me, June 20-The following nomluations were made at the republican county convention for Piscatatjuis today: Benntor, Rodney C. Penny; judge ef probate. Ellas J. Hale: registrar ol deeds. AlaiiBon M. Warreu; ooun ty commissioner. M. J. Jewett; couuty attoruey. Miles W. Mclutosli; county treasurer, Frank E. Gurnsey; sheriff. Abial E. Leonard. Death of Mrs Cordeha Adams. HINGHAM. June 20-Mr8 Cordelia (Wilder) Adams, widow of Joseph D. Adams, died at the old Wilder mausion on Lincoln st yesterday, aged 82 years. About m years l^so she received injuries and had not been out of the house since. She was a patient and cheerlul sufferer. ___ St Alban's New Church. ST ALBAK8. June 20-The new Congregational church here was dedicoted with jinprehsive servtcesi this evoniug. This church ia "ne of the liandhomcst fatreU eJitices in the state, and reolacoii the one doKtiDyed bv tiro on the moruiug of Thanksstivlng aay. 18U1. The only beer sold- on draught at the "itop" concerts is the oelebrated Rochester Bohemiaa. U NEW LONDON, June 20-There Is a cherry tree, in ripe fi-uitage Just with out tho window of the room wherein Robert J. Cook slumbers nightly on the breeze-swept bank of the Th.ames, at Gales ferry. At daylight every morning, a flock of loud-voiced and sociable robins tune up In this tree after an early cherry cocktail, and "Bob" Cook can sleep no more. He rises, and after a 5 o'cfock plunge off the dock Into the Thames, Mr Cook wanders Into the boathouse, and spends the two hours until breakfast In looking around the Yale shell, and thinking over the faults of the crew,wjth a view to evolving plans for Its betterment, The sky was full of lowering and raln-laden olouds when the Yale oarsmen tumbled out with sleep-heavy eyes at 7 o'clock this morning, and started up tho dew-drenched country lane on their antp-breakfast tramp. �yhe air was chilly and damp, and the young giants, who last night sprawled around clad in armless jerseys and sunburn, were glad to get Into their fleecy sweaters, _ The eight was ordered out at 9 o'clock, and coxswain Olmstead, having the whistling buoy voice, steered the shell across the river to the little cove behind the railroad bridge. For two weeks it has been a source of dally thanks and astonishment that the old paper practice shell has held together. It has the pathetic look of a broken down selling plater. Coaches Cook," Bolton, Ives and George Adee left the launch, and timed the eight from the bank, while a half mile was reeled oK to the upper end, and another back again. The stroke was kept up to 80 and above all the way, and the men were steaming when they "let her run," but for some reason the time was fully 10 seconds slower than was rowed over the same water under similar conditions nearly a week ago. Mr Cook told Capt Johnson to go back and put his crew In the new boat. In half an hour the new paper Jfaolng shell which will be used in the Harvard race next Thursday shot Into the cove, for the first time Jumping to tho heave of eight sturdy Yale banks. The men naturally felt awkwnrd at first, but as thoy gut the feeling of the new shell, it stayed on its bottom and ran steadily, But another trial of the hnlf mile added more wrinkles to the worrl�d brows ot the coaches, for the lime was no better, and there seemed no other conclusion than that the Ynle orew couldn't row a half mile aa fast as they oould last week. A cross wind may have affected the speed of the boat in a slight degree. While Yale was fooling around the cove. Harvard was trying half miles on the upper end of he course, and one half mile was caught by a Yale man as 2 minutes 40 seconds, fairly good time for the conditions. been, scheduled for Wednesday, starting at 11 o'clock, but as this will oon-fllot with the freshman race, strong efforts are making to have the yacht race postponed until Friday. The regatta committee of the New London board of trade is working to have the I race postponed, The fast steam yacht Helvetia of New York will officiate as the referee's boat In the university raoe.   She Is furnished by her owner, I N. D. Thorne, at the request of George I Adee, as It Is Yole's turn to fui'nlsh the referee's boat. The Helvetia can do 18 miles per hour, and Is 80 feet long.   Bflson P. I Gallaudet, stroke of last year's Yale eight, arrived at Gale's Ferry today, and will remain for several days. He Is accompanied by Wlnthrop B. Dwlght, son of Pres Dwtght of Yale. Tonight Yale rowed leisurely down the river,, and then came back over the course on time. Capt Johnson's men had the misfortune to get Into a steamer swell. They also had to steer out of their course for a steamer. With these delays they oovered the course In 22m 488. The Harvard freshmen yanked their shell over to the start, and rowed a half mile In Sm 50s,which is a slight improvement. They had to stop for a steamer. The Harvard university orew took advantage of the good conditions, a fast tide and a good breeze up stream to row over the four mile course on time. Coanh Perkins took them down to the start In the launch, with the shell towing behind, and at the big Thames bridge, the eight embarked and started up the long stretch. Kales pumped the stroke away at 38 to get them going, and kept it up for the first mile. Then the swinging crimson backs settled down to 36 per minute. The tide was fair and tho conditions very good. The watches made Harvard's time 22 minutes and 40 seconds MAN GROUND TO PIECES. Unknown Track Walker Instantly Killed Last Night Near Norfolk Av Brldge-HIs Description. An unknown man was struck by the Inward-bound "ghost" train on the New York & New England railroad near the Norfolk av bridge at 9.05 p ni yesterday and was Instantly killed. His body was literally ground to pieces. The man was walking on the track and evidently did not hear the train approaching. He was drawn beneath the wheels and was terribly mangled The remains were taken to the city hospital morgue by tho police. As near as can be learned, the dead man was between 30 and 85 years of age. of dark complexion and sallow face, had dark hair, and wore a mustache. He was clothed In a dark brown suit, con gross shoes and light stockings. Italian Slashed With Razor Blade. BankerTurco'sWife is Accused. Two Knives Found on Her Person. Arrested and Released on Bail. Troobie Caused by Meetings at the North End. Men Objected to Losing Their Jobs. the officer. He was taken to the station, and a physician was summoned. Sevan stitches were required to close the wound and stop the flow ot blood. His Injuries, the physician said, were not dangerous, but he would be marked for life. Ragene Salvano, who was present at the time of the cutting, called at the station shortly after and exhibited his clothes to the sergeant. They were cut in several places, and he claims that this was done at the time Castellucl wns attacked. When the womari was taken to the station she was searched, and two knives were found on her person. When questioned about the affair she refused to talk, The charge made against her was assault with a dangerous weapon. The reason the police give for the Turco woman using the razor, If she did, Is that her husband, Blaglo Turco, the Italian banker, was severely criticised at the meetings for the action his countrymen believe he took In causing them to lose their empioyiftent with th� contractor. The attack caused much excitement at the North end. and it was feared that there would be more bloodshed before tho night was over, consequently there was a careful watch kept oh that section throughout the night. WHIPPED fl BOY TO FeATH. Atrocious Act of a Colored Farm Laborer at Kettle Ruhi a Small New Jersey Town. MT HOLLY, N J, June 20-The little village of Kettle Run, near Marlton, was the scene ot a singularly atrocious murder Monday. Sidney Plummei*, a colored man, 50 years old, had a grudge against Harry Richardson, a colored boy. Both were employed on the farm of William Hays. Monday Plummer cut several whips, stripped the boy and whlpppid him until he fell lifeless. He then picked up the body, carried It to a creek and threw it Into the water. The water was too shallow to hide tho body, so he afterward carried It on his back to the barn and covered it over with canvas. Then he telegraphed Mr Hays that the boy was dead, and also libtlfled the coroner, who placed him under arrest. mwm Amendments Shower on f Meigs Bill. Senator's Line Up on Both SideSr Kittredge Fires ftel Opening Shot   ; :| Defends the Rights of Boston Citizens. Many Others Speak for and Against the Measure, More Affrajs Maj Mlof In Italian Colony. BcU Bill Finally Passes Both Houses. , PLYMOUTH STILL ASHOBH. First Attempt to Pull Her Off Regarded Mow as a Mistake. NEWI-'ORT, R I, June 20-The Fall River line officials are becoming alarmed about the Plymouth. It is now generally admitted that the attempt to haul her off was a most foolish piece of business and has done the ^teamer considerable Injury. In the morning eight of Merrltt's wrecHlng pontoons are expected here, and they will be put In position as soon as possible.' "'JWelgfhf'Ht^atneP'  3ived, but he will prob- ably be able to officiate. The  Yale-Harvard  yacht  race   has INOALLS  OFFERED   THE)   OHAIR. I Asked to Become Editor of the pommer< oial Advertiser at $26,000 a Year. NEW YORK, June 20-Hon John James Ingalls has been In town for several days. He came to New York on the Invitation of Thomas H. Hubbard, representing the Commercial Ad vertiser, and he has been asked to be come editor of that ancient newspa per. The place was offered to Mr Ingalls at a salary of J2o,000 a year, and, like Horace Greeley, he was to be permitted to make occasional skirmishes through the country in the shape of lecturing tours. Death of Ex Senator Perkins. WASHINGTON, June 20-Ex Senator Bishop W. Perkinsof Kansas died suddenly' in this city at 4 p m today. �X'lncenzo Castellucl, one who )s re. puted to be an Influential member of the Italian oolony at the North end. wag slashed With a raptor last evening as the result of an Indignation meeting held Sunday evening to protest against the padrone system, and will be marked for life. The flesh on the loft side of his face was laid open from ear to mouth. The cutting, he alleges, was done by Crlsttna Turco, a beautiful woman, the wife of a banker doing business on North st, She was arrested by police of division 1, charged with the deed, but was released on ball a short time afterwards. Several other Italians, wbo witnessed the affair, were also arrested, but thoy were also released on ball. According to the story told by the police, the cause of the'Affempt on the life of Castellucl dates back to one day last week, when a contractor visited the Italian qviarters of the city for the purpose of engaging a number of laborers. He wanted tlie men at once, he said, and no sooner had he expressed his desire to employ men before several hun. dred surrounded him, ready to go to work. He selected 100, and named a day for them to go to work. Everything was peaceful then, but trouble soon arose. It Is alleged that shortly after engaging the men he was accosted on the street by an Italian of some means, who, according to the story told by the police, said he could furnish tho men for him at the time he wanted them at tt much lower price, This man. It Is alleged, said he would get the men from New York city, and they would bo as good workmen as those selected. If not better. Naturally the contractor wished to get the men at as low a figure as possible, and It Is said that when this man goaronteed that he could furnish the men, he was told to go ahead. It did not take long for this pews to reach the men, who claimed they had been engaged, and a storm cloud arose. All this took place on Saturday, late In the afternoon. All that evening the men discussed tho question, and decided that something should be done whereby they could get redress, An Indignation meeting wag called. Tho men mot In North si on Sunday afternoon, and In strong language denounced the action talten by the person who, they claimed, negotiated wilh the contractor for men from another city, thus depriving them of the work. But this was not all. They wanted the public to know that they bad not been treated fairly, so 100 ot them marched Into Newspaper row Sunday evening, and laid their complaint bo-fore the editors of tho morning papers. The result was that more feeling than ever was caused, and since that time things have been lively In and around North sq. Indignation meetings have been held dally, and last evening an unusually large meeting was held. Fully 500 Italians, the police say, were In attendance, and for two hours speeches were made. SAW THE THIEVES AT WORK. Five Men Watched Them While They Stole Olothing and Jewelry and Made No Attempt to Interfere. Two carpenters and three laborers/at work on a new house on Laurel st, Somerville, j-esterday afternoon, stood still and watched two sneak thieves enter a house across I he street and ransack it to their heori's content and then allowed them to escape without grlvlng any warning. a. When the job was done It prov�d to be one of the boldest daylight robberies ever committed In the city of Somerville, and the thieves made gOod their escape. It was between 2 and S o'clock, and Mr and Mrs George A. Brown, living at 21 Laurel st, are the losers of mr-"-valuable goods and money. The story told by Mrs Brown Is follows: "I was In the kitchen, and about2,fiUI attempted to go Into the bedroom,which l8 on the ground floor at tho right side I'or ttiB''lMnisie^-/for~)nj<�-'�uc�ffi�e I found the door was locked on the Inside, and came to the conclusion that ail was not right. "I rushed out the front door to the window of tho room and found the screen was pushed up. "I called Mr Rice, who lives upstairs and he went In through the window and unlocked the door. The room had been ransacked and everything of value was gone. "The men who were at work on the new house opposite said that there were two young men implicated. One entered the window and passed out clothing to tho other, who put it on over his own clothes. "Tho stolen articles are a man's light summer suit, a biaolt coat and vest, a pair of light striped trousers, a lady's gold wntoh, two gold rings, an overcoat, a diamond stud, a diamond pin, bangle bracelet, a gold dollar and JIS In other money. The value of the goods stolen amounts to J200. "The workmen across the street say they made no outcry because they thought the two young men, who were reapectably drwsud, belonged In the house and hod been looked out." Mr Rice attempted to follow the thieves. He traced them through park st to Beacon st, where all track of them was lost. It Is supposed they made for Norton's woods on the pambridge line, where they divested themselves of the stolen clothing and made it into a bundle. One of the workmen siild that the light Hult worn by one ot the thieves did not cover the dark coat under it, Mr Brown was notlfled of the robbery and reported the affair to the police within an hour after it happened, Extra, oIMoers were put to work on tho case, but up to a late hour last night no arrests had been made. Leplators Dispose of. laiif^ Oilier Matters. Best summer drink for children. Keeps them well and strong. EXTRACT i So delicious, economical, healthful, and  pure.    Unequalled in the world. All Grocers snd Druggists, 3Sc. If You Feel Tired, Weal(, Weary Worn out, run down from housework, by impoverished condition of the blood or low state of the system, take HOOD'S Sarsaparilla 'Ihe peculmr toning, i-urlfytiig urirt vltalklnE HiiuUHfSoC thii Kucuea-sful medi'.'iiie urt; toon Ii-U ihiu'.ijjhout the entire fcystem, exi�Uing (ii^ease uiul giving  il's S;triJfti):trUla Makes the Weak Strong Hood's Pill�        �" l'�it'u�n'm. jmndlce, Indljewloc, alek heiOitoho. sac The meeting resulted in the appointment of a delegation to wait on the newspapers again, and Vincemso Castellucl was one ot the number chosen. Just before 7.30 o'clock he. In company with the other members of the delegation, left North B(j, bound for Newspaper row. They walked up North st, talking earnestly about their grievances, turning neither to the right nor to the left, and, as Casteliucl told the police, they did not notice any one following them. But,according to the evidence gathered by the police,there was some one following, and that person was a woman. Bhe kept some little distance from the men until they had nearly reached Ulack-stone st, and then she came almost up with them. CostellucI reached the corner of Black-stone Bt, and just as he was about to step from the curb he felt some one touch him from behind. He turned, or started to turn, and a razor was drawn across his left cheek. Blood flowed over his brca.st and shouldtr. li was his turning uround, he says, that saved his Ul'e, (or he ha.s no doubt that if ho hud not turned the razor would have severed his Jugular vein. He uttered a cry, and the men who were with him turned and saw a woman. 'X^hlB woman, Castellucl claims, was Crlstina Turco, and he alleges that ahe did the cutting.___ A patrolman was near at hand, and the woman was placed under arrest. Castellucl was also (iiken care of by POtlCy SHOP KAIDBD. Three Men Arrested at 218 Cambridge 8t Vesr�rdfty. Ijate yesterday afternoon division 3 police, armed with a search warrant, visited tho alleged policy shop at 813 Cambridge st In search of gaming Implements. Many policy slips were seleed. Three men, giving their names as William Chambers, 40; John Carson, 39, and Jam^ Dern, 2 ; started yesterday's debate by moylnif,;; an amendment to secure to property/j owners .compensation for ' damages)!; caused by the construction or operation^!; of the road. Mr Kittredge, speaking to tbtil amendment, condemned the bill as p,'f great Injustice to the citizens of Bos-;! ton, whose interests, he declared, had ' been altogether ignored. t No bill has ever passed the leglsla-."; ture without such a provision, said Mi*) Kittredge, and unless it Is adopte4i property owners will be absolutely;';: without protection; for under the btHi as passed by the house, the road may| mortgage Its franchise, leaving abutrJ ters powerless to collect for daraage�| which they may sustain. .it Mr PltBgerald asked If lilr Klttredgfsi would vote for the blU If the ameB4*| ments were adopted. '�f Mr Kittredge could say nothing coni^^ cernlng amendments by other 8enators,| but If they were satisfactory from f legal point of view, he would vote for'i them. ' \ij Mr Fitsgerald assumed that Wie? amendment which Mr Kittredge prow,l posed was not incorporated In fran-ii chlses of steam railroads, and he would';; not Impose it upon the road sought to' bo Incorporated. ;S Under the bill, Mr FltJigerald Baia.J the road was compelled to file a bondi to assure payment for any land taken. | Tlie then reviewed the work of the; committee on ti'anslt' and recited thfti facts which Induced the committee tQ.; report In favor of an elevated railroad rather than a subway, ivhlch was oon� slderod impracticable. He also discussed tho Imperatlvo new cosslty of solving the rapid transit question, portraying the congestion la the business district of Boston �jjil; the lamentable incapacity of present^* roads to deal with the problem. Mr Sanger of Suffolk asked Mr FltB�, gerald to define his objection to tht amendment. The latter answered that It would re� quire that an almost fabulous sum b� deposited with the court by the oom� pany, and would further result Jp great > Coittinued on ilie Fourth Vtug*. Tho srreat vionulurity ot The Miniuili and Fakmek, Mii]i:lRiiter, N H. as an udyeiv tiiiiig medium is demonstrated by the fact tiint It carries ni(h-e ndveitifcing than any of its New Knglaud contemi)oranes. 1   Dilnk Kienzl" at the "pop" coaoerU. You See Them Everywhere. Wheeling is the popular sport of the day, and good \^^eels can be obtained at popular prices. In addition to our splendid line of 1894 Columbia Bicycles We have a large stock of machines of other makes, second hand and slightly shopworn, which we can sell at prices to fit any purse and on easy terms of payment. POPE MFC. CO., OFFICE, SALBSEOOM, KIDING SCHOOL, 221 COLUMBUS AV., BOSTON. -in, rlrX. 47   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication