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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: January 26, 1893 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - January 26, 1893, Boston, Massachusetts                                GLOBE PR(NTS MOST WANTS BEOAUSfe MOST PEOPLE READ THEM. GLOBE PRINTS MOST WANTS BECAUSE MOST PEOPLE READ THEM. VOL. XLHI.-NO.   26. BOSTON. THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 26, 1893.-TEN PAGES. PRICE TWO CBNTa Dr. Spectre for the Cure Supplied by Potter. ITALY DEMANDS SATlSFftCTlON. If the Brazfallan Government Does Not Respond to Peaceful Requests, Foroe Will be Used. Rome, Jan. 26.-Sie. Tueinl, the Italian miniOTto Brazil, has been lostructed to domand fionx the Brazilian sovernment satisfaotioa for the ouiraRsa committed lastsummernpon Italian sailors and residents at Santos dnrine a tlotwbiohocoarred there. The Italian minister has several times urged upon the Brazilian eorernmeiit the insttoo of irrantinK compensation and redress for the injuries then inflicted upon Italian subjects. ' ' The Italian government has lost patience at last, and now Sig. Tugini is instructed to sa7tbatjf satisfactioi) is not given prompt];' Italy will sustain her demands by force. SAID BAYAROJVILL ACCEPT. Cleveland and Lament Confac with the ex^Secretary and Urge Hint to Accept . the Portfolio of State Department. Lakevtood. W. J., Jan. 25;-Col. Daniel Lament, former private secretary to Mr. Cleveland, came here from New York today and was met by Mr, Cleveland, Who toi)k him to the Cleveland cottage, where they were joined by ex-Seoretary Bayard. A loni? conference followed in Mr. Cleveland's private study, and at 4 o'clock Mr. Cleveland conducted his ex-seoretary to the station, where Col. Iiamozit boarded the train for the city, From knowing ones it is learned that Mr. Lament's journey bbre was to use bis influence in persuading. Mr. Bayard to accept the portfolio offered him by Mr. Cleveland. Mr, Bayard bad been rather undecided about accepting. It is said Col. Lament's Tisit/^as, successful. I^QT^ND DYINa- ON STlEtBET.- ttJnknow Man, Koked Up by a Koxbury PaiTolraajj, DiM. At e o'clock last night a patrolman of Btation 10 founi] a man lying nnconscions i atthe'qorner, of Llnwood Park and Elm-' woodsts.. He was taken to the station and B physician summoned. At 10.40 o'clock he died without returning to consciousness. His' body was removed to the City Hospital n^orgue and Medipal �;zamtper Draper notifled. He w'as about 27 years old. of dark complexion, smooth face, and weighed 165 pounds. He bad on a black derby 'hat, black inside and outside coats, striped pants, congress boots, overshoes, red stockings, and a black necktie, with small dots. Boston SiBQ Iiost in the Magdialena. NbwVobk. .Ian. 26.-rA cablegram re. ceivetl here today from SavaniUa, Colombia, states tliat Christian Jansen of Boston ana Oapli. Roe of the Norwegian steamship Antonio Zambrane have been drowned bjr the upsetting o| a boat m the Magdalens river. \ Av-open ktter to women. Thurlow, Penn. "Dear MrsJ Pinkham: "If any one wants to know how good ypwr rwedjcine is, just refer them to me. "I ^as so low, people thought I never could get well again. "The trouble was in my woinb, causing bearing-dowh and severe backache, I was so nervous and .irritable my people could hardly live with me. Sometimes I would almost fall down, I was so dizzy, and how I did lie awake^ nights! I thought i should go crazy! But now all that is changed, and I api a well woman. I owe all to .Lydia E. Pjnkham's Vegetable Compomd. Now, when I do not feel just right, ,1 take a bottle of your medicine and a box of your pills, and they never fail me."      ^ Mrs. L. Travie. All dtuggliU Mil It, or teat by mnll, In (orni of rUIs or LoMneeii, on ra- PtUs or LoMueefi. ------ celptofSH. Cotrespond-enos freely nniweted. Ad- z.pjmbiiab _ Etw, Bass. enos imv$ BMwerea. AO-  ^    j m, - > Z.PJMB!1.ABMI!D10AJ.U0.,^       ' cta>.j^ aso. 100,000 Pipes full of LUCKY STRIKE TOBACCO Are smoked every day in the year. Those who would enjoy health and luxury should use this wonderful brand. ,^        - ,Plue and Cut Plug. R, A. Patterson Tobaeoo Co. Rlohmpntl, Vs. jjUKroavirrocerforBIalnedleirieyMUk. CONTENTS OF TODAY'S GLOBE rrnto 1. Italy demands satisfaction from Brazil. Arrangements for funeral of Bishop Brooks; church in sombre hue; body lies In state. . Ex-Fresldent Potter on trial. Bitter oon.fliot between two labor organizations ; SkelSngton speaks for one^ldo and Bishop for the other. Asserted Bayard bas^ accepted the State portfolio. PaaeS. Prospects of the passage of the Andrew banking bill; CNell's proposed nenslon pbanges. / World's fair contest booml.ug. Rev. Alexander Blackburn, new preachei: at Cambridgeport. Fatce 8. Dancing parties in Boston and itssuburbs. Nantucket again hemmed in by ice; Residents of Tnokernuok island reported short of food. Fishermen's ProtectlVe Union ftUeges many violations of contract labor :law; labor gossip. Rev. Albert E. George's views on two Episcopal dioceses in Messaohusetts. Howard's gpssip. \ Face 4. Statue tQ Bishop Brooks as tribute of the masses favored by eminent men. Vast supply of ioe lor Boston's consumption the coming year. Granite State dairymen in session at Con-cora. Dr. C. A. Eastrnan decided against by Secretary Noble in his controversy with Capt, Brown, Indian agent at Pine Bidge. pesolutions adopted by B. F. Butler Post, 42, G, A. E, of Lowell. Fao^e S. O'NeiVs proposition to make sweeping changes in the pension laws. yale will apply the now rule in regard to eligibility to crew and base ball team as well as to foot ball, Wllll&m Mercerean, 66, once of Boston, elopes with' a 18-ye(u;-old girl of Bingham^ ton, N. Y. MilUonnalre Searles tenders building of sciences to'Bowdoin College. Fage 6. Annual meeting oi the Marble Dealers' Association. Story of Goebel's invention of the Incandescent lamp 30 years before Edison's discovery. . Short session of the Legislature: Senator MUtou introduces a bill to establish' police boards for cities. Langley testifies in his own behalf. Proceedings of Spmerville's busy aldermen. Berlin aecbed tor Princess Margaret's wedding. Page D. Salary list for court ofBceis recommended by the committee. Two BomervlUe boys arrested at Manchester. N. H, charged with stealing a horse and sleigh. ANOTHER PHaQ  INSUItANOB  CO. Mr, Jphn q. Paige Majuager of Palatine Company of Manoheeter, Eng. The Palatine Insurance Opmpany (limited) of Manchester, Eng., has been admitted by Insurance Commissioner Merril) to do business in Massachusetts, and has arranged with Mr. ,Tohn C, Paige to act as its manager in Boston and vicinity. The Palatine is one of the great and growing successful companies of Great Britain, a welcome addition to the list of such already here. Its cuaraoter is weU,showu by the fact that its trustees in'Now York holding its funds ^or the protection, of United States policy holders are those eminept financiers and business men, Hon.. Chaunoy M. Depew, president ot the New York Central railroad, Hon. Asbbel Greene, and Gen Lou|s Fitzgerald, president of the Mero^n-tile Trust Company of Now York, while its manager in the United States is Mr. Wil* liam Wm/d. The Palatine has in the United States total assets of 91,266,78S.4S, and a net surplus over reinsurance reserve and all liabilities o( �65tt,672m3. The policyholders also have in addition to thetjB the security of the large Eugltsh invested assets, as well as the very important amount o(. unpaid capital for which the aliareboldere are personally liable, the subscribed capital being 4,300.000, of which $860,000 has been paitt in in cash. The company is of high standing In that great manufacturing pity of Manchester, and is under the successful management of Mr. J, N, Lane, one ot the celebrated fire underwriters in Great Britain. Editor Bruoe Wins pa Heiress, yonNQSTowN, O., Jan. 20.-The most fashionable event in Youngstown society this season was the marriage tills evening of Lester Coombs Bruce to Miss Julia Andrews. The former is the editor of Turf, Field and Farm, a New York publication, and the latter is the beautiful and accomplished daughter of 0bauncey H.' Andrews, the njilhpnnaire iron king of eastern Ohio. The wedding took place at the residence of the bride's parents. Three Jllen Fatally Injured. CotiCMnuB, Ga., Jan. 26,-Yesterday the large saw mill of J. W, Favors & Ca, at [Jpatoie was blown into atoms by the ^t,-plosion of the boUer of theenglne. Will Griffin and Titus Heath were killed. Bandy Tinsley, John Grant and Aaron Watson were fatally and four others seriously hurt. John ;&Iartin Jfominated. TopBKA. Kan., Jan, 28.-�loh�, Martin, a Democratlo lawyer of this city, was nominated for United Ststes senator by the Populist caucus at i o'clock this morning, aftet a hard fight^_' Mr. Cleveland Will Not he Present. Macon, Ga., Jan. 25.-A message wps re-ceired today from Presldent-olept Clevei land saying that it would bp impossiljle for him to aitend the fuoerfil of Justice JLamar, Y. ft 8. "Aome" Uooriee Pellets. Unectualled for purity ww* esoellenoe. HIS QONDlTiON UNCHANGED.' Mr. Blaine was Resting: Comfortably at 6 p. m.-Indications of Easy Time for the Sufferer at 12.30 This Morn-Ins- Washington, Jan. 25.-Dr. Johnstonnaid a visit to Mr. Blaine at 0 ,o'olock. He said the patient was resting comfortably, suffering no pain and there was no appreciable change in his condition. He would not return, he said, unless sent for. Still BostUig Comfortably. Washinoton, D. C, Jan. 26.-There has been no change reported in Mr. Blaine's condition since tlie doctor's visit at 6 o'clock this evening, and at 12.30 a. m. everything at the house is quiet, with iudi-cations that the sufferer will have a comfortable night. THE WEATHER. Washihgtok. Jan. 25.-Forecast lor Thursday: For New England and oaatoru New York,  fair, ii colder; northwesterly couotw winds, Xiocol Eorecaat. For New England, Thursday, generally fair and slightly colder; variable winds, mostly f rem jfltp8t_j|i._    , Synopsis-A deoigod oo]d wave has appeared over the country west of the lakes, and unless a storm develops ip the Mlssts-sipp! valley and moves northeastward, will b'e felt in New England on Friday, Snow has fallen throughout the lake region and a slight storm is central in Texas. ^Ilsewhore the weather is generally fair. _H. H. Clayton. The Temperatuxe Yesterday as indicated by the thermometer at Thompson's Spa: 3 a. m., 28�; 6 a. m., 30�^ 9 a, m., 33�; 12 m., 87�;3.n. m., 42�;6 p, m., 87�; 8 0. m., 33�:12 mid.,30�. Average temperature yesterday, 33 4-21�. ESCAPED  WITH SUGHT INJURY. Dr, Latimer of Baet Cambridge In a Runaway Out in Roxbury. Dr, Janies A, Latliher ot East Cambridge narrowly escaped serious injury in an accident in the Roxbury district, last evening. Shortly before 10 o'clock, two horses at taohed to a coupe, driven by Edward Irvine and occupied by Dr. Latimer, were coming into the city on their way to Cambridge, and when near Dudley St., on Washlugton, 'the horses became badly frightened at an electric car ind dashed away nt a breakneck speed, W bile the jftaddenei animals were tearing across Dudley st. Pr. Latimer tnanaged to jump out of the vehicle, and he escaped with slight Injuries, Down Washington st. the horses con-tmued their lively gait, creating consternation in the hearts of the pedestrians, until they reached the corner of Ruggles st., where they collided with an oijttwara bound Columbus av, oar. Driver. Irving and both o|l his horses were thrown violently to the ground. Driver Irving sustained a dislocation of an ankle, and was conveyed to the City Hospital in the patrol wagon belonging to station 10.       , , - Both of the horses were very badly injured, one so severely that It is believed be will have to be killed. The couoe was completely wrecked. The team was the property of Charles W. Bailey of 105 Cambridge St., Cambriuge-port. Dr. Latimer was assisted jjo his home in East Cambridge, and was reported by his wife last night to be "all right." White Man Stabbed-Negro Panged.; New Okmans, Jan. 25.-A negro ex-con-viot named Fisher, upon being reprimanded by bis eipployer, Mrs. Martin MoMahon, today, seized her by the haji! and eut her thr||at, daugerously wounding her. A white man. James Barrett, caught the negro, but the latter stabbed him three times, killing him. Fisher was afterwards caught and banged. McCarthy Deseirts Conservatives. , flWYNOB, Ont., Jan. 36. - Dalton Mo-Carthy, hitherto one of the most prominent CoDsarvatives. has broken aw;i.y from his party on the trade question. At a public meeting tonight he advocated a preferential tariff with Great Britain and reciprocity with the Untied States. Resolutions indorsing his views wpre adopted. 9NFAU.ISL�I IF GIVEN AFAJBim MARK THE bus hundroi and forty-four (4-oi,) lottlse onred' ^^{)0^o brlslu in Intellect, more eariieet in bU rellgloiKlIre, ana more ieitluua In bli endenvoretorecliUmBfbera than be ever wai. 1 no\v have euthe conM;fnue }n eendlnii him anywhere, even Into iha s^floon^ to reaeiie olherd. I thank you tor what yEa have done for him. Voura truly, T       KOBEpr HEROE. nRONKlNNESS CUBED by BOSTOt? PPUQ, a seoret, lafe and positive remeay. i�o t^ie, no pdor,- (;ai) beulven wltlioul tbe pfttl^nt'. knowledge. It destroys ibe dl>ea>adAppeUtetpr.Umulaht;andreifjre� to the vleltin. tupir povrer o( lesUlanc. to temptitUon., Ourp gnaraumeii. Dent py mall, ^pld In 4rui! .tor<^ ppiee Bl.OO. aainpls Free. Boston Dru� Co., 106 Ghaunoj SL, Boston, Bitter Conflict Between Two Factions. Telling Shots by the Leader of Each. Jnstice of Boycott the Point at Issi&e. Rival Claims of Blue and Yellow Labels. Skeffington Speaks for One Side, BisliQp the Other. Both Contend That Their Actions Are Jnstified. lalematioflal Uem ani I o( I. 18 Human curiosity was illustrated yesterday aftern'ooii at tbe Potter trial. Outside tbe "door. Of t|ia United (States District Court roorn In tbe Federal bulldinfe a lot of people gatbered, only to peer in, as they were kept out by tlie court officer and his wand of office. There were many who could not got in, because others had captured all tho seats, and Marshal Doherty would rather rorc[et to cry "Court" when the Judge comes in than let any one stand in tbe c6nrt room. 01 course, some of the inquisitive ones were lawyers, who merely wished to hear the legal points of the case. A trial without a wdman spectator would not be considered ouite right. Mrs. Anna 0. F�ll-heg pardon, she is Attorney Anna C, Fall-came in a few moments and listened to tbe low spoKen answers of Hr. Tobey. Then there wore lots of people who bad absolutely no claim to hear the tria), except tbe need of filling in an hour or two and a place to quietly doze, If they were in need of tbe latter reaulro-mont tbey oould not have selected a bettor place � than the court room, for it was a sleepy day from tbe opening of the case by District Attorney Allen to t^io final clisa-greement of the counsel. After the jurors had been called and found present in the tnorning. Judge Put-napn, who, by the way, resembles the late Phillips Brooks to a marked degree,warned the Jurorsnot to read the newsnapers and to get their only knowledge of the case from what they heard in evidence. Then ho settled back in his cbair and nibbled tbe end of lead pencil, Then District Attorney Allen consumed an hour and a halt in telling t)ie jury what the government wouldsbow, walking back and forth in front ot the jury box mean-.tim?. 1   *      - Qe mentioned that 40 counts of the In-diidtmentpre basedupbn the provisions ot the national bank act, and that the remaining counts were based on the statute making it unlawful tor an officer or agent of a bank to certify a check before the amount shall hayo Been regularly entered to the credit of tb^ dealer on the books of the association, Ue said that the government would show that the bank certifieil checks' to the amount of $70,000 when there was not a dollar of Evans & Co, on deposit. Then six of the, government witnesses ^ere sworn. They were Partner Tobey and Mo.ssrs. Moore, Keene, Smith, Hunt and JJunbar, Certlflcatps of the organization of the bank and its extension of charter were offered in evidence, as were the records of the stockholders, showing that Jan. 13, 18Dl,Asa F, Patter, Jonas U. French, Thomas Dana, Henry P. Wood and J. W, Work were elected directors of thejbank. A record of a meeting Nov, 1,188(1, giving the president, cashier and assistant casbler power to certify checks under certain conditions was also offered, Austin B. Tobey was the first witness called. He was one of the "Bo," in the firm of Irving A, Evans & Co,-, and is familiarly known as "Partner Tobey." He testified that his duty was to take oliarpeofthe books, cash and securities of the firm. He stated that the account of the firm at the Maverick National Bank was overdrawn most ot tlie time. District Attorney Alien askert tbe witness what the cundicion ot the Evans account was when a cheek of July 34 was drawn. Then Col, Hopkins objected for the defence and Mr, Allen withdrew bis question, but introduced the check with others. Again nounsel for the defence objected, and tbe jury were excufed till 2 o'clock. After a long argument the question was ezcluile Tbe case before you," he said, "arises nnderi the national bank act so called! rather, perhaps, under the statute attending the life of national banks." '  He stated the statute in this case nrovidei that there shall be no certification by a bunk of a obeok drawn on the bank unless tl)ere IS then on deposit to the credit of the drawer of the cbeck an amount of money equal to the amount of the ebeok. The grand jury has presented an indictment in which the first 40 counts are l)^ed uppn the provision of tbe statute. The remaltilng counts are based on the statute providing that It shall he unlawful for any officer or agent of a bank to certify a check before the amount shall have been regularly entered to the credit of the dealer on the books of the association. Mr. Allen then explained the effect of certifying a check, and continued: "We shall produce tho man who signed the Evans checks. We shall show you that the defendant signed the certification, that the checks ^ere passed through the clearing house and were palil. We shall show tliat when ft check was presented for certification the messenger handed the chepk in to the cashier's department at the bank-for certification. Tbe officer in that department put on the check of certification and entered on a slip on his desk the amount of the cbeck and the names of the drawer of the check. The check was then taken to Mr. Potter, who afhxed his signature." Mr, Allen then detailed the methods ot the bank In the matter of certified checks, wliioh are similar to those in vogue in other national banks, ^ Continuing he said; "Wpshall show that on each day when these oheoks of Evans & Co. wore certified, there was not deposited in the bank funds sufficient to meet the morning's overdraft, so tbst each day tbe overdraft of the preceding d^y had been Increased. 'The checks which are tbe subject of this indictment are these, all drawn by Evans & Co,: Check payable to Hayward & Town-send, for $2460, dated July 23, ISSl; olieck for 82S,000, payable to National Security Bank, datfd July 24, 1801: check for 98276, payable to George U. Brpoks & Co., dated July 24, 18�1; check tor ^25,000, payable to the National Security Bank. "Wo shall show, therefore, that in the cases ot these checks the bank OertineU Nearly 87O.O00 when there was not a dollar pf Evafls & Co. on deposit to meet them., 'There are five checks only declared on In the present in au)�. Austin B. Tobey was the first witness. He testified: "In July, 1801, I was a member of tbe firm ot Irving A. Bvaus & Go. These papers are the articles of eopartnership between Irving A. Evans, W- S, Bliss and Austin B. Tobey, My duty as a member of the firm was to take ohargo of the books, cash and securities. In doing my work I drew cheeks and deposited with the Maverick National Bank. Had deposited with that hank since 1886. Its president in 18Q1 wai Asa P. Potter, We denosltod wltb the bank ijntll the first of October, 1801. I wai familiar wltb tbe deposits made with the bank," "Canyon tell the condition ot your account in July, 18017" 'Tt was , Overdrawn Sfost af the Tlmq." Objotstion was made that the answer was not resDopsive, tbe court adding tbat wit-ueas must he more careful in his wswerg. Tho check: ot Hayward & Townsendwas then shown witness, and be - sftld that be drew it. Witness was asked It he could Identify the check dated July 24, but the ooart thought the check SDoke for itself. Beturilinfi to the Hayward & TqwQsend check, witness said that the concern was a firm of brokers, and that the check was drawn in. tbe due course ot business ot Evans & ilo. The court here asked the distript attorney It he intended to put the check In evldenoe, and reoelvlnit an answer In the afilimatlve, suggested that it be put In before further questions. Tbe check was then put in. Ta ing up a cheek ot July 84, Mr. Allen asked witness what was its condition when it left Evans & Co.'s office. Witness said that It bad no certification on tt. Tbe checks were npt all drawn, he said, in payment for stocks. Witness thought he itnevr what was done with the checks after he drew them, but as be said be did not take them to the Maverick bank to be certified, he did not know in a legal sense, and therefore could not testify on that point Mr, Allen asked witness about the condition of Evans &, Co.'s account at the Maverick bank wlien be drew the obecks In question, but Col, Hopkins objected on the ground that the books of tbe bank In the possession ot the government would show this and was the best evidenqe. Judge Putuam said that if the district atlotuoy insisted on putting the question he .would excuse tpe jury until 2 o'clock and hear coupsel on the admissibility of tbe question, and also on tbe admissibility ot the five checks. Mr, Allen withdrew bis question aud then offered the checks, and Col. Uopkms objected to their introduction. Wben the Jury Had Betlred It was found that the defence did not make any question as, to the form of the oheoks as was autioipated, and further argument on the admisalbillty ot the obecks was deferred tin later on in the case. The court then told counsel be would hev them on tlie admisslliiUty of the ques* tlon. ' Gov, Robinson said the goTernment pvs^i prove that when the checks wer'o drawn, )Sv�iis & Qo. did not have on deppoit tands Oontlnned on tbe mtth PmRO. Nothing in recent years has so stirred up tlie diifeient labor organizations of New England as the action of District AssemblT 30, K. of L., on the Bouvo-Crawford trouble, and tho almost simultaneous visit of Gen-oral Master WPtkman Powderly to this oily. The vote of tho district aasombly to sustain its oxooutivo board in refusing to sanction tho boycott on the Crawford shoe, and the counter move of the Boston aud Brock* ton Central Labor unions in reaffirming tha boycott and condemning District Assembly 30 "for its unwarrautable interference," have rekindled th war between the two branches of organized labor. The speeches and published interviews ot General Master Workman Powderly seem to have added fuel to the fiame Instead of being "oil on the troubled waters," as they were probably intended to.be. The trade unionists ot New England were all anxious to have George E. McNeill take up the cudgels against Powderly. Ue waa seen by a Gr.oBU reporter, but he declined to'say anything at present for the reason that the attack was directed mainly against the shoemakers and espoolally against the Boot aiid Shoe Workers' Internationa Union and Its general secretary, Mr. U. 3. Bkeffingtpn. He thought that Mr. Skefilni;-ton should be given full opportunity to ba board as he was the one most affected, and there was no doubt as to Mr. SkeSington's ability to answer Mr. Powderly and fetuta his statetnents in relation to the trade anions and the shoe trade in particular. Tbe Boot and Shoe Workers' Iat�ur-national has its brnnobes In erery shoa town in the United States and Oauada, aad maintains headquarters In Boston at 88S Washington St., where two offices arepcp^ pied by the organization. Here Mr, Skeffintrton was foun4 bnaily engaged in going tbrousb a bnge jpllo ot letters. In answer to the question: did the Knights pf I.abpr take tbe acttpn they did on the Bouve-Crawtord trouble?" be made tbe following statement; "Tbe recent action ot Distriot Assemblri No, SO, Knights of Labor, In deciding IM lift the boyoott on tbe Crawford shoe is onl] the outward eyidenoe ot tbe secret figb) that has been waged by tbe Kpights oj Labor against the blue label of the boot aiid shoe makers cf America and ag^nst tb� Boot and Shoe Makers' International Unloa In particular, "This trouble between the trade unioai and the knights, over the boycott on tba Crawford shoe, I� Only au Inoident. "It is necessary to go deeoer orrathortalM a more general view of tbe situation m order to clearly understand what led nu ta this action on^he part of the knights. "In doing this, I think It is best to ttiJka the public utterances of the acknowledged leader of the Knights ot Labor, T. V, Po^-derly, during his recent visit to this city. pontluned on tlie Slsbtlt ]Pa�a. What '93_Brings. For a long tiaM rufRed curtains ol muslin have beea in favor, but all curtains for tlw drawing-room ha.Ta been trimmed widi a tassel edging. We are nov showing glass cop. tains of finis �il|c, enriched with a two-inch ruffle ^ actly the same ai on the musUns* The   effect  pn�- ______________duced is deddedl:^ novel, and " strikes oS " from tbe osnal treatment We have some in plain silk and otiieis with a broche detached figure in pwe empife style. The fabric is spfj luid drapes beautifully. We have hung a few with Bnidkli �ash laces, a most lovely effect, u ^ the delicate tracery of the lace cim b� seen through the silk. They are the nearest approach to the refinement of rich goods. The price Is temArkably low: Plain in �11 ooloia......$7.60 per Umpire Design........$10.50 p�r p(4; 48 0ANALST. {""UVilSr* 1   

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