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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: January 9, 1892 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - January 9, 1892, Boston, Massachusetts                                IF YOU HAVE A Be sure to specify under which heading !; you want it, and be sure that a -prize is offered for that head. GET? YOUR In early today.   Everybody is reading them. VOL. XLI.~-.HO.  9, BOSOTON, SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 9, 1892.-TEN PAGES. PRICE TWO CENTS. ^ 25o, per 'bbl. allowed for express on Hour e;oiiig beyond our delivery limits-Price List mailed to � any address uiDon application. 25o, per bbl, allowed for express on Plonr soine; beyond our delivery limits. Prioe List mailed to any address upon application, BOSTON. TICKER WAR ENDED. Gold and Stock Company Agrees to Pay $100 Every Day for Use of the Exchange Quotations. Nitw York, Jan. 8. - Tho ticker, war ended today-by tlio capitulation ol tlio Gold and Stock Company and tlie success ol the stock oxchangB uiaiiagers. The ticker company agrbcd to the demand of tho oxohansre that SlOO sliould ho raid every day for tho uso of tho quotations, tho Btocli oxohango to have tho right of. cutting off smy subscrihor from tlie company's wires. It was tUouKlit that tho oi'dev to cut off the consolidated oxchaugo would ho issued a;t ouoo, but it did not come, and tho big exohanco otTicially furnished tho little ex-chaniio with all its trading figures. OLD RAW HOLD. Proposed" General Advance Voted Down. Jew England InsiiraiiCfl iExcliange Takes Important Action. trying Cottolene, the new, popular, successful vegetable Lard. Don't wait for your neighbor;to tell you aboutlt It is the first duty of the ho use-keeper to provide wholesome food. Everybody recognizes the unpleasant effects of the so-called "richness" of food preparedwith lard. The"rich-ness" is nothing but grease; the housekeeper knows that its presence in"food is unsafe and unfit, biit now science has discovered success is unbounded. It will enter every kitchen and increase many foldlFe varieties of food which may" be enjoyed. The housekeeper need no longer hesitate in the use of shortening in catering; forthose who are delicate. The problem is solved. Use Cottolene.  Sold by all grocers. Made in Chicago by � n. K. FAIRBANK & CO., 5 Central Wharf, Boston. tiSHearth Preserved V    Life Promoted BY  USiWC THE PERFECTION   ADJUSTABLE   SHOE EXPAN��3 witli every molloii ot tlio loot, thus glvlug Sulid Comfort. A. imrrower shoo can bo worn. Kotaata Its orlglnr.l Bhape. Instant   Kellcf   tor Corns, Bunions aurt  Tender Perfeotioii in Sijie and Fit. �*rovcnta JJamjjnc^s ami Cold Feet. Artistic. Elcgar.t and Lvoi'.omual. Workiiinnslilp ar.a M.iti!/i,T.l 0 uur.^nteod. jLadlcs! If you want a Fhoo that combines tnoro Stylo. Comlort and I>ur{ibIIUy than any other make caU lor the PERFECTtOiM  ADJUSTABLE Po2nilar fitylcand Popular I'riccs. CoKsoLiu.vTKn   Siioi: Co., M'f'm. t.ynn, .Mags. For sah! in Hoston hv II. M. GllAUA.M ,t Gb., '701. 703 WnsllinEton Bt. APJUST.\1!LE .SHOJS S'lOUE, 10 West St. JOSEPH llEK.Vltl, oca IVaalllliRton at. DOWNIKG t HODGE, 108 (.'uurtst. LAlin JiROs., lOSO Waahtnistou at. W. W. FIIASCI.S, 477 -Main at., OamhrldRP. 0. D. WILDEK, C'amhrMKi,^_1     TThS  jaS Corns. Authorizes OoEimitteo to Prepare Less Swoepine;. Measure, The New Ensland Insurance Exchaneta has had under cousidera'iion for some time the adoption of a co-insuranco clause, also tho matter of, a general advanoo in rates throughout New Ene'land, and yesterday's mooting, a special, was called to consider tho matter. President U. C. Crosby ooonpiod tho chair, and tho attendance was unusually largo. 'riie matter under consideration was the report of the conimittao appointed some time a,B:o to mvestiKate the advisability ot any action, in regard to this matter, and which was as lollows: That on and after Feb. 1, 1803, all rates in Now England under tho jnrtaaiction of tho exehange, exoepi rates on dsvoUlwg houses and contents, and lirlvalo stables and contents appurtenant thereto, paper, pulp, anrtlcatlior board mills and contents, and risks rated by tho factory Iniprovonient com-nilltce ot tho oxohange, shall bo adopted by tho ex-oliange as now rates, baaed on tho acceptance by tho assured of an 80 per conU co-Insuranco c:lar ,u to he uttnchcit to tho policies writton on sucli risks. In oa.qcs wliero tho assured shall doollue to accept an aO per cent, co-lnsuranco clause as a part of the policy, an additional charge shall ha nuida ou tho rate equal at least to 25 per cent, of tho rate. Tliero w.as a general feeling that this report was too svvoepiuB in its charaotor and thilt what w.a3 wanted was not .1 horizontal raise, but an incroase on certain risks andm certain localities, and after moro than an hour and a half had been spent in debating and amending tho above it was voted down, nearly two to one. It was tuen voted that the president be authorized to appoint a committee o� nine to talte into ooiisidoratiou the subject of an advance in rates in certain districts and on certain classes of hazards, this committee to render a report at tho earliest possible d.ito. President Crosby will annmmce this committee .some time today. No other business was tran.saeted. TO THE) DEATH. Maiden Twin Sietors Die on Their Birthday Anniversary. WiLKESBABRE, Ponn.,Jan. 8.-Juliaand Mary Howard, maiden twin sisters, died at their homo hero last nitcht almost at tho same hour. 'J'hey died on the .same day of tho year and at tho samo hour they wore born. They were CO years of age. Ono was a victim of pneumonia, tho other ot dropsy. Xliey lived togeUier all their lives. Some years ago Brussels Laces in very-coarse patterns could not be bought lower than jfiSapair. This week we shall offer a limited quantity in the latest exquisite French effects, for ricli drawing-rooms, for only Will offer a steak for \ 2C. per $$ Ws pound, equal to any sirloin. Bone-   48 NORTH ST., BOSTON. $$ $$&$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ Bear in mind that Brussels are the most web-like of curtains, and these are the most refined designs, as well as the newest goods. For festoon drapery nothing takes precedence tliis season of the soft and [ lustrous "Louis Damask." It falls naturally into the most graceful folds, and has a bewitching effect. At $5 a yard we have three new color studies: (i) An old ivory ground, with pattern done in warm browns and gold; (2) a ground of blue, with ribbon design worked in metal yellow, and (3) a shrimp ground with figures executed in golden brown. Those who have not leceived otiraSS-page catalogue of new farniture can have same mailed to them on receipt of five 2-cent stamps for postage. P .0 I 48 nmi ST. South gi&e IlOiitOii A ilaino BiiSoU CONTENTS OF TODAY'S GLOBE. PllBO 1. Gold and Stock Company capitulates; end ot the war. Now England Insurance Exchange votes down tho proposed adviince in rates. Two hundred and twenty-threo the latest deiith list in tho Krehs miuo disaster; another mine explo.slon in Pennsylvania. Girl burned to death in Brooklyn. Four men killed by a boiler explosion in Chicaso. Another disappointment for Blair of New Hnmpshire. " Meeting of wool manufacturers; memorial on tariff act drafted. I'liire B. Banauet of Business Men's Domocratio Association ot New York; ox-President Cleveland and Congressman Springer speak. Toboggans fly down Covey hill loaded with dainty belles; Harvard oarsmen in the tank; sport gossip. Paao ffi. Medfiold celebrates the birthday anni-vei/sary of Dr. Lowell Mason. Indians need watching. , Charles ii. Quackenbush shoots his wife at Newiirk, N. J., and then blows out his own Mwams. Description of proposed All Saints' Episcopal church, Asinnont. , Progress of the grip in New York. Annual concert and ball of tho Clinton Rifles. Madame creates the role of "Leah" on the Tromont Theatre stage. Looking for junk in Boston harbor. Division meeting of tho Encampment bnmoh of Odd Fellowship at .SDrmgliold. JPase 5. FindinB of Judge of Crimes Foster in the Valparaiso riot. Gen. Corcoran before Quaker city Democrats. Hangman's ropo breaks at Homerville, Ga.; murderer hanged 90 minutes later. Tolling fato by blood. Labor men pledge themselves to buy only union label goods. Jackson celebration at Portland. Qidoou M. Eandall, DO, of Biddeford, Me. iPttsro Q. . Lonely ending of a Bolton recluse. '. Pace 8. " Proposed international silver Congress indorsed by Senator Carlisle; Washington news. Commissioner Liuehan wai'ns NewHarop-.sliire citizens against tlie World's Fair Excursion Company ot New Bedford. England and France .and tho succession in Egypt. Wherefore Quay would .annex to the United States sever.al Mexican States. Election to office saves a New York man's life. Sleighing on tho mile ground and the arsenal road. Weekly review of the trade. IPnsce xo. Death of Rev. William A. Blenkinsop in South Boston. Putnam's case recalled. Grip in the Caroline islands; does it come from there here? De.T,th of Actor James V. Dean. Supremo Court takes exceptions to Insurance Commissioner Morrill's ruling. GIRL BURNED TO DEATH. Enveloped In, Flames She Broke AwaV fcom Her Mistress and Struggled to the Streist. New Yoitic. Jan. .S.~,Mary McMullon, a servant in the employ of Mrs. ITendcrson of 607 Madison St., Brooklyn, was burned to deat^i today bv her clotliing taking firo at an open grate. The girl broke away from her mistress, who tried to supi>ros.s tho tlamo.?. .and ran out into the stroot. Sho was oomplotely enveloped in flames and staggered along tho street until she finally fell exhausted to the ground. Wh.on the llames were extinguished, tho girl's body w.astliorouglily cooked. Her hair v/as completely gone and p.atches of sklu and Jlesit rolled from olf her body. Sho died an hour later. THE   WBATHBH, Washington, D.O., Jan, 8-8 p. m.-Forecast for Saturday: For New England andNew,Yorlc, snow fiurrios, turning to rain, slightly warmer, south winds. Looal IToreoast. For New England: Fair till Sunday, except local snows in Vermont, New Hampshire and nortliern Mtdne, warmer Saturday, colder Saturday liight and Sunday, southwefit and west winds. A- storm of sliKht energy remains in tho lake regions, hut is slowly moving north and will probably disappear during Saturday. __H. H. Clayton. Temnerature Yeaterctay As indicated by the thermometer at Thompson's Spa: 3 a. m.. 32='; G a. m., 2;!�; 0 a. m., 2(1�; 13 m, 30�; 3.30 p. m., ii2='; 0 p. m., 31�; y p. m., 27�; 12 mid., 2C". Average temperature, 27y3�. OAUOHT m TH33 ACT. David J. Knox Breaks Into a Store and la Immediately Arrested. Ltnn, Jan, 8.-A daring attempt at burglary was committed at 11.30 this ovenmg. The periodical store of Fi'ed Nowhall, on the corner of Broad and Lewis sts., was entered by David d.Knox, \yho smashed tho gla,5E panel in the door, thus being enabled to unlock it. Oilioor Jordan, who was a short distance away, heard the sound of breaking glass and rushing up found Knox inside the store pryiug tlie money drawer open. lie arrested him ^vithout any resistance on the Dart of the orisojier. Knox was searched at the police station, where a bunch of skeleton keys ivus found on bis person. Ho has been in trouble several limes before for clrunkounoss, but this is tho first timo he ha.s been arrested for any serious offence. The store is in a busy neighborhood, and pedestrians are constantly pa.s.^ing tlio door, and a liorse car is almost always in sight from just ont,=)ide tho store. Ineror-acd Dose by Mistake. PoRTnAN,D. Me.. Jan. 8.-Mrs. Emory D. Harmon of Deeringdied suddenly tonight, the result of an ovirrdo.-io of moriiliine. Mi'.'!. Harmon had been in tho habit of taKiiig morphine to relieve pain during attacks of illness and by misialie increased the dose. WWrled to His Deatii. Trextok. N. ,T., Jan. 8. - Frederick Goldenbaum wa:s killed today at Koebliug'.s wire mill. He was caught in a revolving fly wheel, and Iiis body was whirled around the shafting at a terrible rate of speed. His right leg was torn from his body. Ehodo Isiond HomcBopatliiats. Pp.ovidhnce, K. I., Jan. 8.-The -12d annual meeting of the Rhode Island Homcc-opathic Society was held this afternoon and evening at the Narragansett Hotel. Dry House and I'aatory Burned. ~ Kkene. N. H, Jnn. 8.-Elisba Mtmsell'^ dry house in Swanzoa and factory filled wirh staves were burned this morning. Loiw tUOO. MMk Scenes' at tlie iiio's Motitli, 121 Seprloi Saved Iroiii llie 350 in Mm- Ho AccsiFate Beatla Mst Can President Gould Not in the Least Pertiirlbed. One Mail Killed and Two Hurt in Penusylv.tnia Mine. McAtwsTEit. L T., ,Tan. 8,-The exact munberof lives sacriliced in the explosion in Osage mine, at Krehs, last night, is not yet known. When the horrible fatality occurred there were at least 3C0 men in the mine. Krobs is about lour miles from here, the property being owned by the Osage Coal and Mining Company. Up to tiie latest reports 127 men have boon rescued alive, though many of them are fatally injured. By these figures there are still 223 men helpless in tho mine, ai\v�o I have talten teii'teem tsotlf.Ees and am per-St'clly waVIl siTcry wtiy. 1 cannot be  a s;6  stricken "With Apoplexy. MoNTPELiEU. Vt, Jan. S.-Jabcz W. Ellis, a prominent capilnJi.st of Montpelier, vioo-pi'eaident of the First National Bank, aiid a director of the Vermont Mutual Firo IiL'iur-unoe Company, wa-s stricken with apoiilexy this morning. Ho 13 unconscious and c;in-not live. Contest ViTiU JESsKin Today. PnoviDEMCa, R. I., Jan. 8.-Tomorrow morning: the initial prooeodings in the case brought in the Supremo Court, to oust Mayor Carroll of PawtuoVet. will be begun. The 27th annual meeting and banquet ol tho National Association of \yool Mann-lacturors took place ut Parker's yesterday afternoon and evening.      ' President William Whitman ot tho Arlington mills presided. Secretary North, among other things, said in his report; "More and moro every year Logislaturos of tlio States are coming to concern themselves ^vitl^ tho conditions of mauulaotur-ing. It is necessary, therefore, to have an organization through which manufactutora may onlifjiiten public sentiment regarding these conditions, and a.ssist in proteotiug tho manutaoturliig interests ot tho country from the consequences ot hasty and ill-considered legislation by the calm and,careful proaontatlon of data, drawn from practical e.xuerionco. "Two examples ol this Ibgislation attracted at tho last session o� tU? Massaohvi-setts Legislature the bill to further reduce the hours ol lalior in factories and tho law forbidding weavers' fines. Both movemonta were favored by many who wore in ignorance of the actual conditions of nianu-laoturiyg in the State. One ol thom sought to remedy a minor ovll, 11 it may bo called an evil at all, whieii rarely results in abuse in any woollen mill by a statute wliieli, if it could have boon enforced in spirit and In letter, would ofl'eotually drive this industry out ol Massaeiuisetts and out ol every State which adopted tho statute." He said of the MoKinley tariff bill: "It is evident that tho now rates of duty are not prohibitory, and probable that tho imports ol woollen goods in the second year under the operation ol the now I,iw will probably exceed S'tO.000,000 in value. Nevertheless, tlie domestic market for woollen goods has undoubtedly been substantially enlarged." The boiiofits ol the National Association to the woollen industry wero thus stated: "The services to tho industry as a whole, and to tho carpet manufacture in particular, which the national association has boon able to render during tho past year, have been suQlcionc to show any woollen manufacturer in the country the vital importance of maintaining an aijoncy like tlie national association, through wliioh 11 constant watch and guard in kept uiion every feature of the administration of tho tariff laws, and upon the questions constantly arising and liable at any moment to Injuriously affect tho intorosts ol Any mmmoU of tlio Maiiufaotnrc." Thotronsuror, Benjamin Phipps of Parker, Wilder & Co., submitted liis report, which was accepted. Tho election of ofricers resulted as follows: President, William Whilman, Boston; vice-presidents, John L. Houston, Jlartford; A. C. Miller. Utica; Thomas Doliui, Phlladei-phio; Theodore 0. Se.arch, Phil.adolphia; treasurer, Benjamin Phipps, Boston 1 secretary, S. N. D. Norlli, Boston; oxecu-tlvo oommitteo. Butus S. Frost, Boston; Joseph Sawyer. Boston; Robert Middleton, Utica; D. L. Einstein, New York; ,7ohn N. Carpenter, Now Brunswick, Ivf. ,1.;, Charles Flotohov, Providenoii, R, I.: D. L. Goff, Pawtucket, R. I.; Georgo Sykos, Rockvdlo, Conn.: JamesDobsou, X'liiladolphia; Lewis N. Gilbert, ^Ware, Mass.: William H. Grundy. Philadelphia; James Philllp.i, Jr., Fitoliburg; H. L. Jame.i, Rockvillo, Conn.; Joseph Motcalf, Holyoko, and Frank E. Simpson, Boston. A oommitteo was appointed to take charge of the wool exhihi; at tho fair. It eonsists ol 11 meinbers.aud Hon. Ciiarlos A. Stott ol Lowoil is chairman. A, oommitteo was also appointed to confer witli Chief of Manufacturing Department Alli.son, as to.spaco to bo accorded tho wool men, aa well as to otlier matters. The conference will take place at liio Parker House tliia forenoon. Tho oommitteo is also empowered to correspond with woollen manufacturers throusihout the United iStatos to stimulate thom to make a conoortod and decided move in tho direction of a groat o;dill)it of their product. The coinmilteo is as follows: Maj. Charles A. Stott of Lowell, Mr. Theodore C. Search of Phlladeliiiiia, Mr. Jolin N. Carpenter of Now Jersoy. Mr. Robert Dorman of Philadelphia, Mr. George Sykes of RockvUlo, Conn., Mr. Lyman B. Golf of Pawtucket, R. I., Mr. Lewis Anderson of Skowhegan, Mo., Mr. W. W. Cofiin of New York city, Mr. Henry G. Kittredgo ol Boston, Mr. O. J. Rathbono of Woonsocket. K. I., Hon. G. R. Ladd ot Spencer, Mass.. Mr. Georgo E. Kunhardt of Lawreiioo. A niomorial, whieli was adopted, to bo sent to ilio ."3d Congress, asking for no interference witii tlie pi'0.-.ciifc tariJ'i', V�':is r.fi I'VHcivcy: To tho nonor;ili!!- the ScniUo iiml llio lloii,so of lt,;p-riL't-'MtiiUvoi,, Wn.sh(lli;tnM: i-hi- .Niitl'jiinl A.h.soi;lii!loii of Wool .ilnmifucUiivra Kspi.'ttfull.v p.;llIlona llii; .'",l!il Colicresn ,i(:iilu:U iiii.v cliiiiigu m lliii iaiiil :k-t of IKOO, partlcilurly ,'�:lii:ii. ulu K of lluil, uyl, ri!lnlin,t; to wool mul � odUciii-, ami fui- Urn fullowhiR iTnsi>ii,-i; 1. 'flio tnrllt net of II5II0 lian been in forr-.j Init in inoiillis. It Is It iiuitlci- of ijcnciMl ii:;i'ri.ii;,iil llial fl-oill tlifco hi llvu ,vi-iiraor li;;lcll.;iil o;�',i-ii,luu imi iCH|iilf�l lo ilctti-inlire lluj .-icl'iia >IV!'i:l,sor a iieiv tuiiir upon ilie r.'V('iiut.ii of tlar jiorLTiiiiioiit. iipini till! liKliisti-itii spCH-iiilly all.'cti'il li.v nuw rates of (Uily, anil upon tins coiasuiiiL'];! of jivfU'li-a to w!ii:h aiifih new nitoH of fluty iiiiply. ,\n latc-Ul'.-ciit ,lu,lenient of the icvsent law, iii'eossary to illsatldfa'iloty revlDloii, \'-\ hot yet pn^^ih'.c. ;;. The rcL'i'.lloli ol l!ie wu.ilaa.l wooll,.,, .seheilnle lulls ja-eHeiU joiaii unlil f, e,n b:; lir.rousiily ;eil!;:l can v.-oi'i. ho liijaiv '.�> v, ii;,ih'a ;,ia;in!':icti;:ei-,-i. TlliTO 1^ universal ag!ci'ar,'l;l aan.ii',- iniiipifaeu;; -ni tliat the laiur 1:1 li.jiv i.e-aia!"!,-aeleatill.ally laijualea lain ivla;!o!ii,l:i:i Lv:i .:\ Ih" .Inll,-,-, on m;'l"rt,M :,ie\'He hnehva p-iAv.-:. 11 ;!uii .-a-t;:bll5lie;j Ihe ia,:,[lilioii of |a-Ill',-fo:- Ih.- n:m:U::s llnlurlry, eo Jitr as ,l�;mm!>-:i! H(-,Ii eii.sl-mi .l!iU.-j. ;;, On ;hi'olhtrbain;, l.'i n.jiliy ti  �oiiiaaeTB has rcnilleilfioiii ihe lav;,  .'.'..i-.vilhs: r.n'nii--: ihe lae: j thlitll),:ilien-aae In i.alii.h-a v,,i.!ieii i:m,]a. by :,'e j l.iti:f of IV.'O, w.u, ;;iva>m  man in   anv cj1I:iv ,.-l,oiluie   (n.-epBiPale-; br tte   a!ir.-r;niml� .>�,� ill .Ideal (li.'i]n'o).oilb.ii be-.',,-, .-n Ibe wo.-l lieres a.iil ! the s!o-jd� itr.li�� (n Ihe tanC vt IbSIl), i)u:i-ei;a.- ! been no in(:;eaae u-ha:i--,-el- in lee jmee ol j lionifslle wouKen iiouas. On tlie eoe'taiy. all ibc �:a:.ie v,..rii,'.-a , ,a;l-i. ai.'l ! inoatofllie .Mney coo.ls, ni ly n.e.v-be (.blaliieil in i the Ei-eii!t6t .i1)Uinlau.-e el a e'.'s'. lo eiai,^;;iu �i-,< h';, t ut li;-h:f InlervalT ol unlvelial iianbi and llaaa- ' eJaluris-5.    Collllletuiii; v.-eolleii u.ooJs ^l^  lovc-iiiu i uinkli iHuo puiil tho liiei-eaaeil iluties v.il.iiiHit an iticreubo uf tlic in-lees at wiikli tliese goods ^iro ioUl to corisuiiiers. Thnu far      Inereuseil Kites have lorcoil 11 oorics!ioiKHiis ruiltioUou lu loi-i'lBii nricea. d. Wfaut tiie woolleu pian-afuotiinj of tho ViJ:od States now ace1�, beforu uU pliio. lit a pfiriod of entire rust, from tiutft ie,;ltaUomvlmwa ft? riidicui Ue-liurtnre from tbo f on liilonj unoii ivlileh tlUf tnilus try la now ori.'anlsed. and to wliloli It hn� lieim fully iKlJiisifd. 'l-iio wooiloii Iniliistry Is snibjeet to iin-iBiiiU mid Mniwoiiliililo dinieultlci, Impoaslblc to fore,�no or provlrto iiiiiiliist, owlns to coiiomrit and nrbltniiy ch.inses lii tho fashions and tho popular ta.llo. When lo IheiO (Uraeiillles nro niiiletl tho uonht and nncnrtalnty iirtalnf! from oontlniinl tariff ufiltatlon, atnblllty Ig destrojod luid prosperity lio-eoines IinposslUlc. In no roccnt Session of C'oiigros.i has the woollen miiniifaotm-o been exempt from tlm loss iirid daina,i;e engendered by attempted modltlca-tloiia ot tho woollen tariff, novcr until by tho act of 1890, in the Intoiest of a InrRcr development ot that liuiuatiy. Wlmtovor deprossloii has niailtod the lu-tUwtry In tlio Immediate past ha.i boon laiuely duo to tlii.s eaiiae. .'jo lend no this agitation contlnuoa similar dopi-esaloiia imiat neeessarlly recur. C. WoafliiroH oontemiilatlnK a repeal of tlio duties on raw matorliil niuat. In tho iiaturo of things, ho niicompnnled by readjnstmenta of tho duties on woollen goods. Whatever advanlage.i, It any, might acenio to our manufacturers from free raw material would ho offset In the first Instanco by tho necessity of readjusting business to these new rates of duty on goods. We prefer tho existing law to tlio lianard of new and untried coudltlona. Nor does tlio cxperlonco ot tho past furnish any gunrauteo that lower prices to coiifiiimers of woollen clothing would result from tho removal of the wool duties. Such n method of rovlatng sohednlo K must bo followed, It not Immwllately accompanied, "by a do tonnlnort onalnuRht npon tho woollen goods datles that might still ronialn-preelpltaUng a now eonton-tlon over the tarld of a fiercer and moro dlsastroiuH cliaraotor than any otlior Indiiotry has cncountorod sliioo tho adoption of tho system of compound aullea; a contontion lIKoly tocKtcml over years, to bccomo tho pivol In repeated political contests, dur-lUR which tliei-o could bo no caenpo from the on-forced illsasler which prolonged unccitalnty would carry wltli It. U. We heg to direct atteutlou to tho extraordinary dovulopmciit of the wool uianntaoture In tho United .'itatea during tho 30 years lii which tho compound system of adjusting tlio wool aiul woollens tariff lias hopii Hi existence, witli variations In classlUeatlon niid rales of duty, as oitcring n coneluslvo reaaou why tliut nyatcni should not now bo overthrown, in l.SOO our woollen nianiifacturora consumed 85,-33A,806 poinida of greasy wool, ot which ao.J. per ecni. waa linportoil, ii per capita consumption ot �2 7-10 pounds. In 1800 their consumption had grown to about tOO.OOO.OOO pounds, ot which BO per cent, was Imported, a per capita consumpllon of CVa pounds. Tlio proporllon of domestic to foreign wool conaunied lu our mills has also Increased, while the per capita value of woollen goods Ini poi'tod liaa ducroused from gL.87 to OO cents. In tlio ordinary wijar of our people tho domestic manufacture ean now oaally supply their entire wants, and with falnieu wliloli for durability and general uieol-lonco are nowliora surpiuaed. InlSUO, tho ISritiah nianutnoturo was couaunilng 800,000,000 poniids of wool annually, nearly tour times ft� niuoli as our own. In 1300. the llrlilah niiinnfaetiiro oonauniod less than 470,000,000 pounds, or but 15 per cent, moro than our own. In thOBO .SO years our iiinniitacturlng consumption or wool lias Increased 37B per cent., while that of Orent llrltnln liiia grown but 67 per cent. No record ot growth eqiuvl to our own Mas Mvev ,lSoo� Witns.'isoti. Marvellous aa this ilevolopineut has been, It wilt be surpassed by the growth ot tho next decade, It tlia tariff ot 1800 renmlna undiaturbod. Ill view ot those facts, wlilbli oannot fall to grattfy tlio national pride ot n patriotic Congress, and In vlow pt llio roiiBona act forth In this potUlon, wo re-reapoctfnlly represent Mint tho nrgnmonts advanced to Justify a renewal of tho nsltnHon of tho wool and woolleini t4irllV are largely luuiBlunry ot tlinocetlcal In their nature I are not baaed npon any ronl advau-tago whioli could reault to tho domestic manu-faetnver or the domoatlo consumer ot woollen gooda; and Oiat they aliould uol: bo given weight by Oougress na iiguinat the mlaeliiet and domoraUza. tlon which a roiiowal of tarllf agitation Involves. Tlio iHauuCactuioia lor wlionv this usaoclallou sponlca, and who are bollovod to comprise n largo majority of the inachlneiy ot the United Mtatea, are satisllea with Hio oxistliig tarlft iaiv. Tlioy fool that utter �o liiany yoara ot tarlll agitation, oulmlnatlng In tho act of 1890, thoy are entitled to a period ot rejili, and they now rospoottuUy pntltlon to be let iilono, tlint tlicy may proaecnlo tliolr Intiustry lu peace and with a rouaonablo ilegrou of conndonce. , President Whitman oooupiod the chair at tho banquet ill the evoniuB. "" About 80 B'ontlomon dined, the only formal trticsts beinp Hon. Joseph II. Allison, oliieE ot the depArtmont of manufactures; Htm. P. W. Brood, national oommisaionor, and Mr. Clarence IC. Hovoy of tho Ma.iaa-chusetts board of commissioners of tho Chioafro World's fair, Mr Cartis Guild, ,7r., of the Commorcial Bulletin, and CouiicUlcr Bphraim Stoarus. Concrossman Julius Ciesar Burrows and Director General Davis, who had both boon Jnvitod, wero unable to be present, altlioiiffU tho latter sent a letter of rcBtet, which was read. Tho first speaker introduood by President �Whitman was Mr. Curtis Guild, Jr., who was coinidimeutod by a round ol cheers. After aunounoiiiK that he proposed to play the clown in the "wool rlns" for a while, ho proceeded to poke fuu at several political ooonoraists and thoir ideas, in-cludinpr Mr. David A. Wells, I-Ion. Georuo Fred Williams. Hon. Rofter Q. Mills and Mr. Kdward Atkinson, greatly to tho amuso-mont ol the members. B^comingr seriou.^, ho reminded his listen, era tliat the oomluK fair is to iia 11 Orciit ISattlo Orntintl, commercial if not political, and forolKu rivals are mavkinir tho prices on thoir troods to ho exhibited here, with a view to show-mir the woisht ot tho protective tariff. Possibly tho prices marked on their fcoods mlBbt bo tlio wholesale or tho ugont'a prlooB, not tho consumer's price, and tiiuy will ({Ivo tlio American price for correspontl-Inef Boodo as hiith as it can bo made. So American mnnufaotureri have got to make III) tlieir minds to meet tliac competition. TIio speaker sugirostcd an exhibit, by Americans, of every (Trade ot woollens made in tlio United States, with wholesale and retail prices marlcod tlierooii. He spoko a (food word for Gov. RiisseH'/j advocacy ol tlio labor exhibit In tho fair, and said it would he tlio fault ol tho wool mannfactiirors if their operatives did not have a sood showinK in sucii an oxhiliit. Hon. James A.ili.son, oliiel of department of manufactures of tho World's fair, was tlio next speaker. Ho uavo an outlino of the scope of the manufacturers' department, and tho bulldintr of liberal arts, by which it appoarod that the former embraces Si lai'KO Kroups and 200 oiaases of manufactures. There was no desire to have a warehouse display, but simply exhibits ol the best examples of tlio work of tho individuals or tiio firm's own product. Uo said about two-tliirds of tlio space at obmuiand of his department is already taken, and If tlio wool uianul'acturcr.'-; desire lo bo well roproMcntod they niusv, apply for space .speodily. Tlio building in which tlio di,-;iilay will he held is to cover il2 acre.'i, and tiie Kaliorios will swell the floor space to 'til acres, or moro than tho entire floor spaoo of the Philadelphia eipo-liitioii ot 1870. Ho said tliat already 51) nations had .slKni-fied their intention tooxhilnt, and, althoutrh Cliina liad not yet done so, niiiny Cliino,so nierciiants will do so. Great' Britain and her colonius will liave 150,000 square feet, and Germany 100,000. Great Elriciin will Jl*ut oil i�. .B.oUl Front In textiles und pottery, and Atnericans must sue tliat foreiiciiers do not tret away with tliein in thesti industries:. Mr. V, C. Hovey, pxccativo commissioner f(,r 5jM.s.--ac!iiiH0it;; of tlie V/orld's fair, spoKe hiv i.i.i !H>ard in deelariu.:,- t!;at they wol-cc'iiR-d the iioiii.ii of the as,'ir,ci:ii!on in tryin/r to slir up tlie nianr.i'ncrnrer.'i ol v.-O'-i'ltiiis to tlio ii;ipc:-ian,;i3 of muiiiuir a sreiit ,-r!iowi;i;;-. Ih- bellL'vcd ,';i,icli coiicerrod iietioii ivould re,-utU in a belter showiiit-tliaii would re.sult Ireiu pureiy iiiuiviiiua! ^*!U.n. Francis W. Breed, imtioual World's fiiir comiiii,Ksii>m:r. lit'.seribcd in Khiv.-inK (�nil.:-.-- ill',! bL-3,-.iiii,'s to aeeruo from iht-ei.miKtrfi-ir. Ii.-,:ii, Titus .Shc:trd ot Littie Fall.s     Y.. suid: "l.'ertiuit ptiluical eeononiist'- ot Uiis oo-.in-try ai-B dircetiiiu'tlu'ir attaclcs avrainst our industry, but wti can shov,- uriuitur prosrei-i | llian any other nation lu lliu; line." Otlicr siieakei'i wero Maj. Ciiarlos A. Stott 01 Lowell and Mr. U. U. liarJintr ol Phiiadolnbia, A brief letter ivas read from Hon. I\lo.r;iH .to dtMif aa lo bo �nnbIo to hear any-tUlii^. I went to tho hospital auii had UB operation peiiVTmcd foL' tho rciiievaluf a aitaract from ono L'ye. 0:io day my eiater l>roui;Ut me two dllferent iu'.Hiichu'-5. ono of \vhl*;h '^vas Hood's Sarsaparllla, iind cfrticd me tho choice. 1 tool; Hood'a Saraapa-rili.'i. iiiiii Rrn'-luully hcijau to foel better and sii'oiijjcr, mid slowly tho Borea on my eyes and In my c'.n-A lutulod. 1 call now hear and see ae weU as eror Thtroiuu onJy tiliijht traces of tho eczema, Wften* over I seo Hood's SarsaparJiJa now I alway.-i feel like bowing and aaylng 'tluuife you.'" Mu^i. A^i.\j;i>.\. rAisLuv, 17(3 Lander Btteetj X(iwbu:-j;h, X. Y. H DO ID'S PSLLS firo partly YcsetalJloaQdora tho bt-st Uvcr iiivisorator ai.ul family eathartlo. fsa ill That a Orussist VViil Offer You i Substitute When You Call for ^yirsi ;beoau,se ee makes IiIoeepboht OS Ti'^OXHSH. U!m KUEO IS SOIiD TO THE OOKSTJMEE AV A pillOB IfKAEEK THB COBT OFPSODUC-TIOS tluia ;.iiy other U!m EEMEDT, LUSCr EUSO li.is mero OEiftrDnE! t8stimi!n,7 of )M t,'�r;!3 ill its favor thaa all THE OXHEK LUSG 1U;MK3IES COMBMED. call FOB it amd 0ET hi M'j/it;;/re/iindd-J if r.oi s.it^M(^^pt ^or^^a, SO olivet s... Boalon, Maaa. ,. -       ,_____ ALL IsnrtHilSrS. T.KiAt. HOTTLK PKEB BI .M.VII.   liVr.O Ml'.DlOLN'K rc. Hwlon, Milt*. *   

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